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View Full Version : A Good 110W/Channel Subwoofer Recommendation?



Sid_Vicious
07-01-2007, 01:33 AM
I now have this big Yamaha AV receiver, 110W per channel, and I quickly blew out a 100W active sub with "fun music", and want suggestions for a replacent, one which will take the heat of a PARTY. Power handling is of supreme interest, yet a "thumper" is desired. What do you suggest, mod# & manufacturer, possibly even an on-line source? PMs are as good as a post, no importa, obrigado, obrigada to the senhoras ...sid~~~hacks at Brazilian Portuguese a little, but 'bout as good as he does pool ;-))

Chopstick
07-01-2007, 08:05 AM
100W??? Did you miss a zero? The last time I was looking at one it had it's own built in amp and it was rated 650W continuous and 2400W peak. I didn't really want to get to know the neighbors at the time so I didn't buy it.

When I was shopping, I did learn something that will help you in your selection. You select a subwoofer based on it's primary use meaning home theater or music. You won't get that sharp thump out of a woofer that was designed for a home theater system. They have slower actions and are good for background rumble effects like an earthquake. Music subwoofers on the other hand, when appropriately powered, can blow a womans clothes right off, but will not give that scary surround effect in your movies.

It all boils down the purpose and price. A 72 inch cone and an output wattage rating roughly equivalent to the sun should do the trick. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Sid_Vicious
07-01-2007, 11:35 AM
What's a good sub for movies going to cost, one which will not die with cranking from the Yamaha 110W output? sid

Rich R.
07-02-2007, 07:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> What's a good sub for movies going to cost, one which will not die with cranking from the Yamaha 110W output? sid <hr /></blockquote>
I'm no audio engineer, but if you blew a subwoofer, with a 110W amp, chances are good that there was nothing wrong with the subwoofer. Your amp came up short, which caused "clipping". "Clipping" is a type of distortion and that is what blew your speaker, not the power. 110W's is nothing for a subwoofer to handle. My home stereo has a 350W amp and I don't have a subwoofer. I have never blown a speaker. The lack of adequate power will blow a speaker much quicker than too much power.

BTW, chances are also good that your Yamaha amp is over rated and it is not really producing 110W's of power.

eg8r
07-02-2007, 09:41 AM
[ QUOTE ]
You won't get that sharp thump out of a woofer that was designed for a home theater system. <hr /></blockquote> I really don't think you are going to find a difference in the actual construction of a subwoofer based on its application. All subwoofers are meant to do the very same thing. To be quite honest the biggest problem here is in the application of the subwoofer. If it is going to be powered soley by your home theater receiver you are just wasting time and will probably blow every one when you distort it for long periods at a time. 110W is not the nominal wattage for the receiver which is definitely much much lower. The subwoofer probably needs a lot more power to effectively perform which would require sid to crank up his volume. Well, once sid gets past a certain point (with respect to volume) he is just sending one poorly distorted signal to the subwoofer.

To fix the problem (I don't know sid had prior so this is a guess) sid needs to buy a powered woofer that includes a low pass filter of some sort. If music is his forte then he needs to get something in the 10-12in range.

Go to Bestbuy and play around with their equipment to see which one sounds the best for what you want to do the most.

Also, on your receiver, leave the bass and treble settings alone they should be set to 0 or dead in the middle. Also, if you have the option of turning on the "loud" button, don't use that when you have the music cranked up it will add distortion.

9.99/10 times a blown speaker has nothing to do with overpowering a speaker. The main culprit was underpowering a speaker at high volume. Distortion is the number one killer of a speaker. You need to make sure you are sending enough power to the sub and your receiver is definitely NOT capable of doing so. You need a powered sub.

Last thing to point out, do not get cheap when buying your sub. If you only have $50 to spend then by a cheapy and do not turn up the volume. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r

eg8r
07-02-2007, 09:54 AM
Hello Rich,

I agree you are exactly correct, 110w is nothing for any sub. The issue is underpowering it. As far as the Yamaha being overrated, MFG's almost always market the peak power of a channel (not the nominal). This is true throughout the entire industry.

The only way to go is with a powered sub.

The best bet is to go to Best Buy or some other local store and listen to all the powered sub's they have. Bring your own music to the store. It is best to listen to music you are familiar with and at the same volume you think you will be playing the sub.

Remember, a good sub is not cheap.

eg8r

Chopstick
07-03-2007, 10:32 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
You won't get that sharp thump out of a woofer that was designed for a home theater system. <hr /></blockquote> I really don't think you are going to find a difference in the actual construction of a subwoofer based on its application. All subwoofers are meant to do the very same thing.

<hr /></blockquote>

Well, they are meant to do the same thing but they all don't do it in the same way. Some are good for music other are not. This subject is discussed in many audio forums.

Sydney, look at the back of your receiver. There should be a pre-amp out for a subwoofer. Running a woofer off of your main amp channels is going to drag all of your speakers down.

I like the Klipsch products. I have a set of them. BestBuy does handle some of their lower priced lines. Here is their woofer page. There are a few from $400 to $600 that look pretty good. Klipsch subwoofers (http://www.klipsch.com/products/lists/subwoofer.aspx)

Klipsch is makes a lot of the commercial theater systems.

eg8r
07-09-2007, 09:12 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Well, they are meant to do the same thing but they all don't do it in the same way. Some are good for music other are not. This subject is discussed in many audio forums. <hr /></blockquote> This would be interesting to read (a lot more interesting than politics /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ). Do you have any examples that I could read (of a specific thread, not the whole forum)? I have not been in the industry for about 7 years so many things have probably changed, but I have never heard of one sub working better for movies than another, or one working better for music. In my experience in the industry growing up the biggest difference was in the amp, crossover, and enclosure construction qualty and type (IB, sealed, ported, etc).

Just for clarification, I might have gotten a little deeper in my reply than you were with respect to the sub. I was referring to the actual woofer, not the other variables (enclosure, servo, etc) which are usually included when talking home theater equipment.

eg8r