PDA

View Full Version : Follow shots



Edd
07-03-2007, 10:48 AM
I generally don't have much difficulty in completing a simple follow shot. However, when I attempt to shoot a follow shot with good top spin for positioning, I have have difficulty. Any advice?

bsmutz
07-03-2007, 11:09 AM
My experience has been that I usually put some kind of unintended side spin on the cue ball or miscue on these shots. What I've done to counteract this tendency is to line up my shot as usual and take my warm up strokes. On the last stroke, instead of looking at the object ball, I'll shift my focus to the cue ball and stroke the shot. I find this pretty much eliminates off center hits and miscues for me. If you are shooting off of the rail, put some down pressure on the front of the cue to keep the tip from riding up on the cue ball. Lastly, I would suggest getting the Jim Rempe training ball or using a striped ball as the cue ball with the stripe horizontal to the table and see where you are actually hitting the ball when you are shooting this type of shot. You may be hitting higher than you need to. Dr. Dave probably has a whole raft of articles and posts covering this very subject on his web site. I expect him to pop in with a link any second now... (Unless he's away for the 4th)

bsmutz
07-03-2007, 11:14 AM
Oh, yeah, as with most shots on the table, I tend to overhit these. Try backing off on the speed a little bit. You usually don't need to go quite as far as you think you do and a well struck ball at medium speed will follow farther than a poorly struck ball at high speed.

Edd
07-03-2007, 12:50 PM
Thanks for your suggestions.

DeadCrab
07-04-2007, 06:43 AM
Keep in mind that because of the curvature of the cue tip and cue ball, the impact point of the cue on the cue ball may not be as high as you think.

Checking the difference between your aim point and the actual chalk mark on the Rempe training ball is a good way to find out if you are hitting lower than you think you are.

mantis
07-04-2007, 10:10 AM
I also find that the proper bridge makes a big difference for follow shots. That and practice.

dr_dave
07-04-2007, 02:32 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bsmutz:</font><hr> My experience has been that I usually put some kind of unintended side spin on the cue ball or miscue on these shots. What I've done to counteract this tendency is to line up my shot as usual and take my warm up strokes. On the last stroke, instead of looking at the object ball, I'll shift my focus to the cue ball and stroke the shot. I find this pretty much eliminates off center hits and miscues for me. If you are shooting off of the rail, put some down pressure on the front of the cue to keep the tip from riding up on the cue ball. Lastly, I would suggest getting the Jim Rempe training ball or using a striped ball as the cue ball with the stripe horizontal to the table and see where you are actually hitting the ball when you are shooting this type of shot. You may be hitting higher than you need to. Dr. Dave probably has a whole raft of articles and posts covering this very subject on his web site. I expect him to pop in with a link any second now... (Unless he's away for the 4th) <hr /></blockquote>Other than checking the chalk mark on the ball to determine the actual tip offset, and making sure the tip is good, well-shaped, and well-chalked, the only think I could add is to check all of your stroke fundamentals per the stroke "best practices" document (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/resources/stroke_best_practices.pdf).

Regards,
Dr. Dave

Vapros
07-04-2007, 05:17 PM
Being able to use follow well is very important in any game, but especially in one-pocket (my game, if I have one). One thing to remember is, if you are hitting the object ball somewhere other than dead center, the cue ball jumps a little to the side before moving forward, and for this reason its' track may not be exactly the one you wanted. It will be parallel, but a little to the side.

Maybe the experts on this forum can verify, but I believe this is more pronounced when you follow than when you draw.

cushioncrawler
07-04-2007, 06:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Edd:</font><hr>I generally don't have much difficulty in completing a simple follow shot. However, when I attempt to shoot a follow shot with good top spin for positioning, I have difficulty. Any advice?<hr /></blockquote>Edd -- Perhaps u are jabbing for difficult shots (ie changing yor style) -- a pauze at the end of yor backswing might change the "jab" to "smooth".

I think that some players aim too high on the qball when they want lots of topspin. Better to aim lower, and have a sort of upish follow-throo. I tend to uze this sort of upish style now for all of my shots, whether needing lots of top or not (and i play on a big table). This way i dont havta change my style for shots (close range uzually) needing lots of top.

And, aiming higher on the qball perhaps changes the uzual angle of the dangle of the cue, ie when aiming. This might change your aim-line without u knowing it. madMac.

pooltchr
07-04-2007, 06:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Vapros:</font><hr>
Maybe the experts on this forum can verify, but I believe this is more pronounced when you follow than when you draw. <hr /></blockquote>

Hitting left or right of vertical center will cause the ball to squirt to the opposite side. I disagree with the last part though. I think it's more obvious when you are striking the cue ball below horizontal center (draw)since you are, in effect, kicking the bottom of the cue ball out from underneath itself.
Steve

mbvl
07-05-2007, 10:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Edd:</font><hr> I generally don't have much difficulty in completing a simple follow shot. However, when I attempt to shoot a follow shot with good top spin for positioning, I have have difficulty. Any advice? <hr /></blockquote>

I'm surprised no-one else has mentioned this, but you should check to see if the cueball is undersized. Cueballs get much more wear than the other balls and they can be significantly lighter than the object balls. This makes follow much harder to achieve.

Jager85
07-05-2007, 12:24 PM
I have realized on any shot hit hard I tend to throw a little unintended english on the ball, and usually miss the shot. I started fine tuning my fundamentals lately, stroke, stance, etc, and noticed that when I hit the ball hard I naturally jump up, as if I were breaking; but not to that extent. I focused on staying down and I made my shots, but was not able to get the power I liked sometimes. I then gave myself a longer bridge, from my bridge hand to the cue ball, by about 2.5" and was able to get the power and control necessary. So for me it was all a matter of staying down.

Curtis

dr_dave
07-05-2007, 10:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Vapros:</font><hr>if you are hitting the object ball somewhere other than dead center, the cue ball jumps a little to the side before moving forward, and for this reason its' track may not be exactly the one you wanted.<hr /></blockquote>I assume you are referring to "squirt" here. The cue ball also swerves back a little. My May '07 instructional article (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/bd_articles/2007/may07.pdf) explains and illustrates these effects fairly well. The swerve happens very fast with a follow shot.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Vapros:</font><hr>It will be parallel, but a little to the side.<hr /></blockquote>This will be true only for certain cue stick elevations and certain amounts of English.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Vapros:</font><hr>Maybe the experts on this forum can verify, but I believe this is more pronounced when you follow than when you draw.<hr /></blockquote>If you refer to the combined effects of squirt and swerve as "effective squirt," then the "effective squirt" is less for a follow shot with English, as compared to a draw shot with English. The main reason for this is that the swerve happens much faster for the follow shot since the cue ball starts rolling (i.e., stops sliding) sooner.

FYI, my series of articles dealing with squirt (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/bd_articles/index.html) will cover all of this stuff in more detail.

Regards,
Dave

Edd
07-11-2007, 08:15 AM
Thanks, everyone, for your advise. Dr Dave, I appreciate your website tips. Very generous of you. BTW, I played with a very talented player over the weekend, and he suggested I abbreviate my backstroke which did seem to help - although I didn't get much opportunity to shoot, as he ran most of the racks. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

dr_dave
07-11-2007, 10:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Edd:</font><hr> Thanks, everyone, for your advise. Dr Dave, I appreciate your website tips. Very generous of you.<hr /></blockquote>
You're very welcome.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Edd:</font><hr>BTW, I played with a very talented player over the weekend, and he suggested I abbreviate my backstroke which did seem to help - although I didn't get much opportunity to shoot, as he ran most of the racks. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif<hr /></blockquote>I think this is an individual thing. It's all about what works best for each person. If your consistency is better with a shorter backstroke, then a shorter backstroke is better for you. Some people can generate more consistency with a longer backstroke. Most people need a longer backstroke on power shots (for power and smoother acceleration).

Regards,
Dave

1Time
07-17-2007, 02:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Edd:</font><hr> Thanks, everyone, for your advise. Dr Dave, I appreciate your website tips. Very generous of you. BTW, I played with a very talented player over the weekend, and he suggested I abbreviate my backstroke which did seem to help - although I didn't get much opportunity to shoot, as he ran most of the racks. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>

No one here can best determine the specifics that make up the problem you're having with a follow-shot. Thus, no one here is in the best position to advise you on how to correct it. Reading about shooting pool may help. Watching instruction videos should help. However, first hand advise from an instructor or better player in whom you can trust is a far better starting point from which to proceed than taking advise from those who've not even seen your attempt at a follow shot. An instructor or a better player who has a first hand opportunity to see you in action is in a far better position to advise a corrective action. Of course that is not to say this player saw your follow shot or that all better players advise lessor players correctly. That said, although it's likely this better player appreciated you racking for him, he likely was not at all concerned with your difficulty in stroking a follow shot.

Unfortunately those willing and able to provide helpful instruction in a pool hall seem far and few between.