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View Full Version : Any Shaft Sealing Suggestions!



cliff46
07-08-2007, 10:14 AM
Hello I'm New to this forum, Looking for suggestions on sealing my shaft, I just got turned down. A Friend suggested Johnson Clear Wax would this work! <font color="blue"> </font color> /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif Thanks Cliff

scaramouche
07-08-2007, 03:21 PM
Each discipline has its own folklore./ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

John Parris makes snooker cues for many top players. From his web site - www.parriscues.com (http://www.parriscues.com) - Cue Maintenance

"Occasionally, (3-6 months depending on the amount you play) treat the cue with raw linsead oil. Wipe cue down with a damp cloth and dry. (If cue is very dirty, mild detergent can be used) do not use to much water or this can cause the cue to swell. Apply oil onto cue with a cloth or paper towel, leave overnight to soak in, buff cue with a clean cloth until smooth and dry and no residue is visible on clean cloth. Then wipe with damp cloth and dry and buff.

If cue is jointed, occasionally clean brass faces of joint with very fine wire wool (00-00 grade). Dirt or grease on the faces of joint can effect the contact when striking cue ball."

cliff46
07-09-2007, 04:24 AM
Hello Thanks For the info, I will have to try this oil!

Wity
07-09-2007, 09:40 AM
Ensure it's raw linseed oil not boiled or whatever. Raw does not contain dryers and does a better job. One coat is enough when your just topping it up but on bare wood you'll be better off applying 4 or more over a week or two. Not really needed but pure beeswax applied as a final coating is prefered by many. Theres many an modern alternative to both but thats the traditional way we Brits use.

BLACKHEART
07-09-2007, 03:07 PM
DO NOT USE ANY WAX OR OILS ON YOUR CUE! This is not a piece of wooden furniture. It's a pool cue, ment to be slid smothly, through the fingers. This is my 23rd year of cue repairing &amp; my 21st year of building cues. I don't know what qualifications these other posters have, but I can tell you that wax or oil on a shaft, will attract dirt &amp; feel sticky. Any clear PAINT that might be on the shaft, should be removed by sanding. Start with 400, then 600, then 1000 &amp; finally 1500 grit paper. Then burnish the shaft with a piece of leather or plain brown paper bag. Then a WOOD SANDING SEALER, should be applied. When dry, LIGHTLY sand with 1500 grit sandpaper &amp; burnish again. The sanding sealer will seal the pores of the wood &amp; eventually will be worn off of the high spots in the wood, but will remain in the low spots in the grain. This will keep out moisture &amp; dirt. Hope this helps...JER

canadan
07-09-2007, 03:24 PM
wow youy can use a paper bag to burnish your cue.. this should be done every time after a light sanding?

Bob_Jewett
07-09-2007, 04:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BLACKHEART:</font><hr> ... I don't know what qualifications these other posters have, but I can tell you that wax or oil on a shaft, will attract dirt &amp; feel sticky. ... <hr /></blockquote>
John Parris is one of the best known cue makers in the world, but he is probably talking about ash shafts for people who use open bridges exclusively. His most expensive cue with bells, whistles and tympani accompaniment is about $800.

Wity
07-09-2007, 05:34 PM
Oils and waxes have been used on English cues for well over a hundred years be they ash, maple or pearwood and it's still the prefered way to seal the wood and to get a smooth feel wherever or whatever the climate the cue is used in.

Blacheart obviously disagrees and has his own way but think of this... There's no snooker player ever had the need to wear a glove.

Rich R.
07-09-2007, 07:26 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote canadan:</font><hr> wow youy can use a paper bag to burnish your cue.. this should be done every time after a light sanding? <hr /></blockquote>
A $100 bill works just as good. It's your choice. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

BLACKHEART
07-10-2007, 08:23 AM
The SANDING PROCESS I explained, is for cues purchased with a sprayed finish on the shaft. SANDING, should always be kept to a minimum. For regular cleaning, a LIGHTLY damp towel, can be used to remove chalk &amp; dirt. Buff it dry with a dry towel &amp; if need be, burnish it smooth. as far as wax is concerned, try it for yourself. The wax won't hurt the wood &amp; if yo feel the stickyness, Sand it off LIGHTLY with 1500 grit sandpaper &amp; then wip the residue off with rubbing alcohol. Reburnish &amp; seal. I don't doubt, other cuemakers ability to produce a fine playing cue. However, on this one point I have a strong difference of opinion. In my expierience, wax will produce a sticky feeling shaft...JER

KellyStick
07-10-2007, 11:17 AM
My cuemaker cleans them up by sanding as stated above then applies some sort of hard wax that he burnishes with a cloth. This makes for a nice smooth finish. All this is done while the shaft spins in a lathe so it goes very fast.

Wity
07-10-2007, 05:00 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BLACKHEART:</font><hr> ...cues purchased with a sprayed finish on the shaft. [ QUOTE ]


The vast majority of english cues finished with either varnish or lacquer come from china is it the same with American cues? I've seen American cue builders web sites that refuse to do any alterations to a Chinese cue and i'm wondering has the number of American cuebuilders deminished in recent years. It certainly has over here, we dont even need to take our socks of to count the number of quality builders left.

(Not that the Chinese cant or dont produce decent cues it's mainly importers buying the cheapest possible and trying to sell them as English with English prices)

jdj
07-11-2007, 12:07 PM
All methods have there place. Waxs tend to fill in small dents. Oils can really make a cue slick. Both of these do collect dirt grit and chalk faster than a dry cue. That is why they require more maintanaince to keep them clean. If wax, or oil is part of travel kit, then maybe the above methods are good for you.

But, I agree with "OLD HAND".

The easiest, fastest, and cheapest way to keep a cue consitently hitting nice is to lightly sand and burnish.

1Time
07-17-2007, 05:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote canadan:</font><hr> wow youy can use a paper bag to burnish your cue.. this should be done every time after a light sanding? <hr /></blockquote>
A $100 bill works just as good. It's your choice. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>

I don't advise use of a bill as it is subject to imparting a coloration to the shaft.

Snapshot9
07-18-2007, 09:24 AM
My cuemaker, Bob Owen, told me to Only use a Wood Polish on my shaft, not an oil, and not a wax.

Deeman3
07-18-2007, 10:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> <hr /></blockquote>

I don't advise use of a bill as it is subject to imparting a coloration to the shaft. <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> You must be thinking of Canadian Dollars, U.S $100's don't run! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif </font color>

1Time
07-18-2007, 01:42 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman3:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> <hr /></blockquote>

I don't advise use of a bill as it is subject to imparting a coloration to the shaft. <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> You must be thinking of Canadian Dollars, U.S $100's don't run! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

/ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif That's a good one.

I've really known very little about caring for the shaft of my cues over the years, and so I consider the info in this thread very useful. Thanks