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Chopstick
07-29-2007, 09:03 AM
I bought a hygrometer for $14 at the local cigar shop. There is a kind of slot in my light so I just set it on the side of my light over the table. Humidity in my room, with air conditioning of course, moves between 60 and 70%. I did this because I notice that on some days my table acts differently than on others.

It appears that the variance in humidity accounts for this. I just thought of something else. Since barometric pressure alters the behavior of water vapor in the air( I am referring o the dew point), would that also alter the accumulation of moisture in the cloth and your cue?

I think I might get one of those Oregon Scientific gizmos that displays all of that information.

My table sure has it's moods. I am interested in quantifying it and understanding it better.

ras314
08-04-2007, 04:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr>
Since barometric pressure alters the behavior of water vapor in the air( I am referring o the dew point), would that also alter the accumulation of moisture in the cloth and your cue?

<hr /></blockquote>
News to me, but then so is most everything. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

Relative humidity is the ratio of the amount of water vapor in air to the maximum amount of water vapor that could be present if the vapor were at its saturation conditions. ie at the dew point. Also since hot air can "hold" more water vapor than cooler air the RH near a hot light may be lower than at the table.

I've been running a dehumidifer quit a bit since the monsoon season started here in order to keep the RH below 40 %, normally I have to add water to keep the RH above 30%. I also keep the air temperature between 60 and 75 deg. Alitude is a little over 6000 ft. New Mexico ain't a big ol swamp like FLA. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

At any rate the table doesn't change as far as I can tell over these conditions. I use a standard ramp to roll balls down the table at a repeatable speed, distance doesn't change much. Not sure how conditions might change the cushions.

Cornerman
08-06-2007, 06:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> I bought a hygrometer for $14 at the local cigar shop. There is a kind of slot in my light so I just set it on the side of my light over the table. Humidity in my room, with air conditioning of course, moves between 60 and 70%. I did this because I notice that on some days my table acts differently than on others.

It appears that the variance in humidity accounts for this. I just thought of something else. Since barometric pressure alters the behavior of water vapor in the air( I am referring o the dew point), would that also alter the accumulation of moisture in the cloth and your cue?

I think I might get one of those Oregon Scientific gizmos that displays all of that information.

My table sure has it's moods. I am interested in quantifying it and understanding it better. <hr /></blockquote>

I'm sure there's some kind of relationship between pressure and relative humidity (certainly for comfort level for sitting around), but since you're already monitoring relative humidity for pool/billiards, then you've got the most meaningful metric, IMO.

60-70% RH is too high for billiards, IMO.

Fred

Fran Crimi
08-06-2007, 08:21 AM
There's no question that humidity affects playing conditions. I think it would be very interesting to test the relationship between barometric pressure and playing conditions. I'd like to hear the results of your tests.

Speaking of humidity, I remember a WPBA tour stop one year in L.A. It was side by side with a bar table event and a retail show. It took place at a racetrack. Don't remember the name, but I think they ran out of space and the WPBA, to it's surprise, found itself set up in a tent outside. We were about 20 yards from the track, where you could hear the horses panting as they were working out.

The real fun part was the humidity. If you got there early enough in the morning to practice, you had to wait for the fog to lift in order to see the tables. I had to keep wiping my hands during my matches because they were soaked from touching the cloth. That was the first and last time we ever did an event there.

Fran

Chopstick
08-07-2007, 10:34 AM
Thanks for the input. I spoke to some friends in the area and their humidity levels are at 40%. At 70% straight pool is a real tough to play. The balls just will not spread much.

I am going out at lunch and get a de-humidifier and see what happens.

ras314
08-07-2007, 07:29 PM
Slow tables due to water vapor in the air has always been big gripe of mine. Possibly because of a major depletion of funds during a match in Mobile, Ala many years ago, when my first introduction to ball in hand rules occurred. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

Wikipedia is great site: A good starting point is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_vapor

However so far I have been unable to find anything very useful relating change in table speed/cloth friction due to water vapor in the air. I think maybe Bob Jewett might have useful insight.

I suspect the amount of chalk dust in the cloth also has an effect.

sygfrid
08-08-2007, 02:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> Since barometric pressure alters the behavior of water vapor in the air( I am referring o the dew point), would that also alter the accumulation of moisture in the cloth and your cue?<hr /></blockquote>

I believe so...

I also have a digital hygrometer in my airconditioned room. It's also monsoon season here and with normal air coming in from the outside, the humidity can reach 70%. If I turn the acu long enough, it can goes down to 37%. If I hang my wet towel w/o acu, it would take more than 12hrs to dry up. But with the acu on, it will only take a couple of hours.

mantis
08-10-2007, 07:49 AM
You definately need to buy a dehumidifier. Regardless of playing conditions, you need one to protect your table. Wood will warp in high humidity environments. You should make that a priority.

Chopstick
08-10-2007, 08:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mantis:</font><hr> You definately need to buy a dehumidifier. Regardless of playing conditions, you need one to protect your table. Wood will warp in high humidity environments. You should make that a priority. <hr /></blockquote>

I did some reading about dehumidifiers. I read that humidity levels consistently above 50% are actually unhealthy. I have three air conditioners already. I think I will just move.

I moved the hygrometer around to check different areas. It is 80% in some places.

Deeman3
08-10-2007, 09:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> I have three air conditioners already. I think I will just move.

<hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> Will they let you to take all those pretty young women out of Florida without a permit? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif </font color>

JimS
08-13-2007, 07:46 AM
I've been wondering about this topic so I also bought a gauge and it reads about 60% after having the ac on 24 hours a day for the last 3 days. Guess I will also have to get a dehumidifier.

mantis
08-13-2007, 12:19 PM
Getting 1 or 2 dehumidifiers will certainly help depending on the size of your room. A/C helps also, but does not completely remove humidity, especially from your basement. Their is a very noticeable difference in my basement with the dehumidifier running. It fills up its resovoir about every day and a half. I really should just run a hose to mu sump.

ken_r
08-13-2007, 12:30 PM
FYI - If you are planning on running it your basement with A/C make sure you get a low temp dehumidifier. Otherwise you will just end up with a block of ice around the coil.

Cornerman
08-13-2007, 02:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JimS:</font><hr> I've been wondering about this topic so I also bought a gauge and it reads about 60% after having the ac on 24 hours a day for the last 3 days. Guess I will also have to get a dehumidifier. <hr /></blockquote>Your AC is already a dehumidifer.

Fred