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View Full Version : Love my new Connelly table - just one problem



dsiomtw
08-13-2007, 11:59 PM
Used to be a B player in college and forgot how much I loved shooting. Finally have room in the new house for a table and rushed out and bought a nice 9' Connelly. It looks great in the house, the tan simonis felt is perfect, etc.

The problem I'm having is with the pockets. They are a TIGHT 4.5" and I'm just not good enough for them. Didn't notice this when I bought the table.

The pockets also seem small overall and have a tendacy to spit out balls shot in with any good force (more so than on any other table I've ever played I think). What normally happens is that the ball flies in, hits the top of the back of the pocket (which is lined with metal or something) and bounces right back out to the table. I could probably "fix" this by messing around with the pockets to get the balls to drop down faster and bounce less, but I'm wondering if I should look into getting new pockets or something.

I'd love to be able to shoot with tight 4.5" pockets eventually ... I just don't know if it's better to kill myself with these now until I get that much better, or give up for now and change to a different pocket size. I mean I'm just getting back in to it but honestly 9 out of 10 shots I miss would have gone in on almost any other table I've ever played on in any pool hall. Shooting into the side pocket with any decent angle ... fughetaboutit!

Oh, the other thing I don't like about the table is that the rails are not as wide as I'd like. No huge thing but after you get used to hitting on a big Brunswick or Diamond with big wide rails and plenty of space for your hand, it's hard to down to a narrower rail.

I do have the top of the line Connelly home table though, with the Rapid Rail, 2" slate and all that. The rails are really nice.

Anyway, does anyone have any ideas for me? Should I just stick with it? I'm worried it's going to take too long to get to the point where this won't be an issue, and it'll be hella frustrating. I'm already wondering if I should sell it and replace with a more "commercial" table.

Deeman3
08-14-2007, 01:08 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dsiomtw:</font><hr>

The problem I'm having is with the pockets. They are a TIGHT 4.5" and I'm just not good enough for them. Didn't notice this when I bought the table. <font color="blue">

4 &amp;1 /2 inch pockets should not be too tight. </font color>

The pockets also seem small overall and have a tendacy to spit out balls shot in with any good force (more so than on any other table I've ever played I think).
<font color="blue">
The question is if the pockets are spitting the balls back because of the small pockets or because of some other factor. Some tables not set up properly can allow balls hitting the back of the pocket to bounce back out. If they are rattling out, you will need to shoot more accurately and, perhaps, more slowly or alter the size of the pockets. </font color>

What normally happens is that the ball flies in, hits the top of the back of the pocket (which is lined with metal or something) and bounces right back out to the table. I could probably "fix" this by messing around with the pockets to get the balls to drop down faster and bounce less, but I'm wondering if I should look into getting new pockets or something. <font color="blue">

As I said above, this is probably a lot of the problem. I had a Brunswick that did this and I had to split the leather backing at the rear of the pocket to fix it. It was too much trouble to have technician come out and do it (way out in the woods). If you just bought this tasble, call the installer out to fix it.</font color>

I'd love to be able to shoot with tight 4.5" pockets eventually ... I just don't know if it's better to kill myself with these now until I get that much better, or give up for now and change to a different pocket size. <font color="blue"> I would lean toward sticking with the tighter pockets as opposed to learing to be satisfied with sloppy play. </font color> I mean I'm just getting back in to it but honestly 9 out of 10 shots I miss would have gone in on almost any other table I've ever played on in any pool hall. Shooting into the side pocket with any decent angle ... fughetaboutit!

Oh, the other thing I don't like about the table is that the rails are not as wide as I'd like. No huge thing but after you get used to hitting on a big Brunswick or Diamond with big wide rails and plenty of space for your hand, it's hard to down to a narrower rail. <font color="blue">Silly question, but why did you buy a table with so many poor qualities? Sorry, but I had to ask. </font color>

I do have the top of the line Connelly home table though, with the Rapid Rail, 2" slate and all that. The rails are really nice.

Anyway, does anyone have any ideas for me? Should I just stick with it? I'm worried it's going to take too long to get to the point where this won't be an issue, and it'll be hella frustrating. I'm already wondering if I should sell it and replace with a more "commercial" table. <font color="blue"> If you don't care to improve much, this would be a good answer. </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

jjinfla
08-14-2007, 04:55 PM
Duct tape. That's the secret. It will fix everything. Put a lot of it at the back of the pocket.

We have 6 Connelly tables here. Just under 5K each, installed, with the top of the line Amarith balls.

Great tables but they kept spitting out the balls. Shoot it straight in and it would bounce out.

We called Connelly and bitched a lot and finally they put the right pockets on. Now we have no problems.

The first pockets were the "pleather" pockets. Cheap imitation leather - plastic leather. In a couple weeks the top was all scratched off due to the cues rubbing on them.

The new pockets with the ruffles are real nice. The throat is still tight. Two balls will get stuck. But the balls do not bounce out anymore.

Call Connelly and put up a stink and get the better pockets and then all your troubles will go away.

Jake

mantis
08-14-2007, 05:01 PM
I have always heard that Connelly tables are known for spitting balls out more than any other table. Hopefully the above answer will help. I love the Connelly Ultimate table with the 6 legs.

4.5" pockets may not be too tight, but they are definately harder to shoot on than normal 5 1/4" pockets. In the end it will probably make you a better player. It will just be frustrating at first.

Congrats on the new table. Have fun.

pooltchr
08-14-2007, 05:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mantis:</font><hr> 4.5" pockets may not be too tight, but they are definately harder to shoot on than normal 5 1/4" pockets. <hr /></blockquote>

How did you determine that 5 1/4 inch pockets are normal?

From the WPA Equipment specifications:

9. Pocket Openings and Measurements
Only rubber facings of minimum 1/16 [1.5875 mm] to maximum inch [6.35 mm] thick may be used at pocket jaws. The WPA-preferred maximum thickness for facings is 1/8 inch [3.175 mm]. The facings on both sides of the pockets must be of the same thickness. Facings must be of hard re-enforced rubber glued with strong bond to the cushion and the rail, and adequately fastened to the wood rail liner to prevent shifting. The rubber of the facings should be somewhat harder than that of the cushions.

The pocket openings for pool tables are measured between opposing cushion noses where the direction changes into the pocket (from pointed lip to pointed lip). This is called mouth.

Corner Pocket Mouth: between 4.5 [11.43 cm] and 4.625 inches [11.75 cm]
Side Pocket Mouth: between 5 [12.7 cm] and 5.125 inches [13.0175 cm]
*The mouth of the side pocket is traditionally inch [1.27 cm] wider than
the mouth of the corner pocket.


5 and a quarter would be buckets!
Steve

DeadCrab
08-14-2007, 06:03 PM
In my opinion, "ball spitting" is more likely to be related to the depth of the pocket shelf, or perhaps the pocket angles.

If the angles meet spec, check the shelf depth. If you have 4.5" pockets, it would be preferable to have a shelf towards the short side of specs. That way, if you clear the jaws, the ball should drop.

I've played on tables with big pockets that were real ball spitters, because they had huge shelves, making it nearly impossible to get a shot up the rail to drop at any speed.

dsiomtw
08-14-2007, 08:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr>
In my opinion, "ball spitting" is more likely to be related to the depth of the pocket shelf, or perhaps the pocket angles.<hr /></blockquote>

Thanks for the replies. I think the problem is indeed the shelf, or the design of the pockets themselves.

These pockets are all real leather, but the problem seems to be that the top of the back of the pockets are reinforced with metal and so they are very solid.

If you hit a ball with good speed it will pass right over the pocket and hit this metal reinforced back/top of the pocket and bounce right back out onto the shelf.

Perhaps the shelf is too wide and if it was shorter the ball wouldn't land back on top of it, I don't know. Hmm.

I emailed Connelly but they didn't seem to understand what I was saying. They insisted that this is normal with new leather pockets and all I had to do was stuff balls in there to stretch them out a little. I guess they thought I meant the ball was actually dropping in to the pocket and then bouncing out the way it might if there were already 4 balls in the pocket or something.

Rackum_n_Crackum
09-12-2007, 11:43 AM
Sorry to bring back an older thread, but I just joined up and was reading through some posts and this thread caught my eye. I have a 6' table that plays just like you described, it has an extremely long shelf area, and is quite challenging to shoot on to say the least.. On the plus side, it makes the table shoot like an 8' table, you need to shoot slow and easy to have much success..

However, last winter I reburbished my table a bit, new Brunswick Centennial cloth &amp; new leathers &amp; Irons..Well, my old pockets weren't bolted to the rails at all so when I replaced them I drilled ot the rails and bolted the irons down like they should be..Which of course made the table shoot even tighter because the rails were all pulled even closer together then they were , making an even bigger shelf area..

What I have been thinking of doing, is to make some "shims" to insert in between the rails and the pockets, maybe 1/4" or so at each joint, thus making the playing surface slightly larger and reducing the length of the shelf..

I'll let you know how much it loosens the table up, maybe this would work in your case as well..

FWIW, I can't even imagine playing on a large table that plays tight...We call my table the biggest little table in the world..lol

Scott