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strokeless
10-01-2007, 07:16 PM
my grandson is 5. what can i show him on the table.
he throws balls into the pockets pretty good. i made him a stool and gave him a short stick. what can he learn at this age ?

Bob_Jewett
10-01-2007, 07:57 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote strokeless:</font><hr> my grandson is 5. what can i show him on the table.
he throws balls into the pockets pretty good. i made him a stool and gave him a short stick. what can he learn at this age ? <hr /></blockquote>
I think the most important thing at that age is respect for the equipment. Chalking. Bridges and grip. Easy drill: shoot the balls straight into the pockets.

wolfdancer
10-02-2007, 02:00 AM
He can learn about money....give him a nickel and tell him this is what he can earn playing pool
then give him a dollar, and say this is what you get playing golf....
Seems to me that 5 is way too young for this game...since he's probably not tall enough to reach the playing surface, and use a normal stroke.

DeadCrab
10-02-2007, 06:01 AM
I would say 9 or 10.

Snapshot9
10-02-2007, 06:32 AM
I would normally say 7, but Mosconi started at 3, and so did Tiger Woods.

1Time
10-02-2007, 12:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote strokeless:</font><hr> my grandson is 5. what can i show him on the table.
he throws balls into the pockets pretty good. i made him a stool and gave him a short stick. what can he learn at this age ? <hr /></blockquote>

He can learn whatever he's capable of. Your guidance will make all the difference. A 7' table for a young child would work better than larger table though. Show him everything he becomes interested in learning. Play a game called "copy cat", and challenge him to shoot a shot as you do, and then once he's up to it allow him to challenge you. Ask him to help you learn how to do what he did. That will encourage him to ask you the same (if he's not already so inclined). The key to learning for a young child is to keep the fun quotient high. Making up games to play and using props like stuffed animals on the table can help. Kids usually respond better to play oriented learning and having relatively unstructured fun more than they do to more formalized instruction. Keep it more like recess than class time.

New2Pool
10-02-2007, 01:55 PM
Thanks for the tips 1Time. I am trying to teach my son as well and you had several great ideas that I look forward to trying.

1Time
10-02-2007, 02:06 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote New2Pool:</font><hr> Thanks for the tips 1Time. I am trying to teach my son as well and you had several great ideas that I look forward to trying. <hr /></blockquote>

You're welcome. Enjoy!

ripper144
11-06-2007, 03:18 AM
I agree that respect for the equipment is the most important thing to learn for a child that young. At that age You cant expect too much of anything in paticular from the child. However as for the proper age to start an education into billiards goes, I would say of course its ok for a young pre-teen and teen to shoot and play for entertainment. I do not recommend serious training for anyone under the age of 23. I am 34 years old now and I can speak for myself to say that when I was 18-21 I used to play a lot for fun I thought I was pretty good. When I was 23-25, I really started training seriously and I found out how bad I really sucked when I was 18-21 and I knew exactly why. The fact of the matter is that when I was playing at age 21 for fun and entertainment it was good for basic fundamentals and dexterity, but "there is no way I could ever understand the difficulty of a complete game"-this is the most important point Im trying to make that stands out in my mind. Because of this I would say that you may learn an incomplete game that lacks the confidence learned through maturity from a long career. That will ruin your whole career in billiards if you ever try to fight your way up to the top and stand there for all to see. Dont ever let a mature experienced pro CUT YOU UP!

Rackum_n_Crackum
11-06-2007, 12:27 PM
I say, get them playing as soon as possible.... My kids both started playing at 4 or 5 years old, they are now 10 &amp; 13 and are pretty darned good.. They're starting to get a good feel for draw &amp; push shots, as well as some basic left/right english.. I have been trying to focus on good mechanics, and trying not to push the english on them..

I can't help but feel sorry for their friends when they get older, they're both strong in pool, darts, and foosball...Gonna be a real couple of husslers /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

1Time
11-09-2007, 08:07 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rackum_n_Crackum:</font><hr> I have been trying to focus on good mechanics, and trying not to push the english on them. <hr /></blockquote>

Now that they're aware of good mechanics, I highly suggest demonstrating the benefits of using english. No need to push english; they will be drawn to learning it. If they are not, then their perception of their relevant competition is not challenging enough. That could be each other or their peers. Getting them exposed to better competition they want to compete with, will motivate them to learning faster.