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bladepxe
10-08-2007, 09:38 AM
Hey everyone, I am new to this forum and I am sure this question was asked countless number of times before but I am at a loss over which cue/brand to buy. I was thinking of a McDermott M6-4B Professional Series Pool Cue. But have little idea whether this is a good cue or not. Also are McDermott cues good value for the money or should I look at other manufacturers like Viking? I have been playing pool for over 12 years now and have finally decided to get a cue of my own. I cant seem to find any info online comparing cue manufacturers. Can you please help, just by suggesting a good first brand or cue.

Thanks,
Alex A

okinawa77
10-08-2007, 12:39 PM
McDermott is a good quality cue. It comes with a free lifetime warranty, and lifetime maintenance. If you have any problems with the cue that cannot be fixed, then they will replace the cue for free.

If you have been using a house cue for the last 12 years, you will find that the wood to wood joint with 3/8 X 10 pin will give you the one piece(house) cue feel.

Viking cues have been known to be back end heavy. More of the weight is in the back end of the cue. Some people like it, some people don't.

1Time
10-08-2007, 02:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bladepxe:</font><hr> Hey everyone, I am new to this forum and I am sure this question was asked countless number of times before but I am at a loss over which cue/brand to buy. I was thinking of a McDermott M6-4B Professional Series Pool Cue. But have little idea whether this is a good cue or not. Also are McDermott cues good value for the money or should I look at other manufacturers like Viking? I have been playing pool for over 12 years now and have finally decided to get a cue of my own. I cant seem to find any info online comparing cue manufacturers. Can you please help, just by suggesting a good first brand or cue.

Thanks,
Alex A <hr /></blockquote>

If you're just looking to buy a cue without first shooting around with it, you can't go wrong with McDermott or Viking. I prefer Viking. However, if you want to find a cue you can shoot better with than others, you'll need to get out and demo a few. However, that isn't to say you could not buy that particular McDermott and learn to love how it shoots for you. You're likely to find moving from a bar cue to a mid priced cue to be quite a change and one that will take time to adjust to.

A value for the money cue selection is different for everyone because it's whatever cue works best for you (performance, looks, whatever) that's most valued. For most players this will be a pro tapered cue in the $100 to $200 range, while others will value the difference found in a more expensive cue.

mantis
10-08-2007, 10:44 PM
DON'T buy a cue without shooting with it period. Try a number of different cues also, and choose the one that feels the best to you. A cues ability to help your game tends to be over rated. Just find a decent cue that feels good to you, but don't spend a few hundred dollars on a cue you have not yet hit, or you may be sorry!!

New2Pool
10-09-2007, 07:37 AM
I have heard that an inexpensive one piece cue will generally outplay a two piece cue. The advantage of a two piece cue is that it is portable so you can use the same cue every time instead of having to adjust to a house cue each time you play. Is this true?

If the above is true, why don't the pro players use one piece cues? Sure it would be a slight hassle to care around but if you are playing in a tournament for a lot money it would seem to be worth it.

Rich R.
10-09-2007, 07:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mantis:</font><hr> DON'T buy a cue without shooting with it period. Try a number of different cues also, and choose the one that feels the best to you. A cues ability to help your game tends to be over rated. Just find a decent cue that feels good to you, but don't spend a few hundred dollars on a cue you have not yet hit, or you may be sorry!! <hr /></blockquote>
For the purposes of this discussion, you provided some good advice. However, this advise goes out the window when you order a custom cue from a cue maker. There is no way you can hit with a particular cue, before it is made. You have to trust the cue maker to make a cue that hits consistent with other cues he has made.

bladepxe
10-09-2007, 10:41 AM
I would love to try the cue before I buy it but there are no places around me that sell cues. I found some good cues in a sporting goods store, but there is no table to try the cue out. virtually every pool hall around me doesnt have any good cues for sale so I am not able to try out the cues. In my original post I was most curious whether anyone can tell me if McDermott cues were better than Viking or the opposite, or some pro/con comparisons between the brands.

DeadCrab
10-09-2007, 10:49 AM
Some of the on-line sellers of cues, such as billiardwarehouse.com, back up their sales with a satisfaction guarantee that allows you to send a cue back for exchange if you don't like it.

I would suggest you buy from one of the retailers who will allow you to swap it for another if you do not like the feel.

Rackum_n_Crackum
10-09-2007, 11:04 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bladepxe:</font><hr> I would love to try the cue before I buy it but there are no places around me that sell cues. I found some good cues in a sporting goods store, but there is no table to try the cue out. virtually every pool hall around me doesnt have any good cues for sale so I am not able to try out the cues. In my original post I was most curious whether anyone can tell me if McDermott cues were better than Viking or the opposite, or some pro/con comparisons between the brands. <hr /></blockquote>

It really hard to tell you what is better, it's really a matter of personal preference.. I don't think you'll go wrong with either of the two....

sygfrid
10-10-2007, 12:32 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote New2Pool:</font><hr> I have heard that an inexpensive one piece cue will generally outplay a two piece cue. The advantage of a two piece cue is that it is portable so you can use the same cue every time instead of having to adjust to a house cue each time you play. Is this true?

If the above is true, why don't the pro players use one piece cues? Sure it would be a slight hassle to care around but if you are playing in a tournament for a lot money it would seem to be worth it.<hr /></blockquote>

NOT NECESSARILY TRUE...

With any cue, whether 1-pc or 2-pc, if the materials (ie the wood)&amp; the craftsmanship are of high quality, then it will perform like a high-quality cue. The only advantage of a 1pc cue is the good feedback/vibration that you instantly feel because nothing hinders (like joints, inlays, wraps, glues, etc.)that energy transfer from the tip to your fingers

Besides, most PRO's are SPONSORED/paid to carry branded cues... so why would they settle for a "house" cue? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Cornerman
10-10-2007, 06:25 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote New2Pool:</font><hr> I have heard that an inexpensive one piece cue will generally outplay a two piece cue. <hr /></blockquote>

You've heard wrong. It's a wonderful myth that has never held any merit.

The best thing about a one-piece cue is that it doesn't have a bad joint. But, a good two-piece cue doesn't have a bad joint either. Especially amongst the great number of cuemakers we have today.

The best things about a two-piece cue that a one-piece could never have are customized weight, balance, and the ability to try out different shafts (tapers and wood).

Of all of these, I think balance and taper make the vast difference in personal playability (other than tip), with weight being strongly important. The rest is just noise. Literally. The sound and vibration of the cue doesn't affect the playability, but it does affect how a player reacts with each shot.

So.. one piece cue? They can be fine, but unless it's made with my specifications of weight, balance, and shaft taper, it coudn't possibly bring out my best game.

Fred

New2Pool
10-10-2007, 07:19 AM
Thanks for the great information. The only problem is that I have been talking myself out of buying a 2 piece cue by telling myself the one piece is better and does not cost as much. Now I have to buy a new cue to reach my potential! Or at least that is the story I am pitching to my wife

Rackum_n_Crackum
10-10-2007, 08:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote New2Pool:</font><hr> Now I have to buy a new cue to reach my potential! Or at least that is the story I am pitching to my wife <hr /></blockquote>

LOL, what ever gets you to bed at night /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Snapshot9
10-10-2007, 10:12 AM
The McDermott m6-4B is fine and a nice cue. It is on sale at Ozone Billiards for $383.20. I would also recommend that you look at Schon cues also (Platinum billiards has quite a few).

SKennedy
10-10-2007, 10:21 AM
If you want to reach your potential, just buy a good cue and pitch the wife.....

Deeman3
10-10-2007, 10:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cornerman:</font><hr>
So.. one piece cue? They can be fine, but unless it's made with my specifications of weight, balance, and shaft taper, it coudn't possibly bring out my best game.

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> And they can be a damned mess to carry around as well. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif </font color>