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9baller
10-14-2007, 04:30 AM
hello guys and gals /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif
i,ve had my 7ft table for like 5 years,but i only recently started to really get into the billiards world.i think i shoot pretty good for someone with only one eye /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif but i want to improve my game.i just have k-mart cue sticks at the moment,but i would like to get a nice one and wanted to ask for advice.
i just read in another thread here about different types of cue tips.i forget who posted the reply but they said a flater tip was for billiards and a rounder tip was better for 9-ball for spin.
what would be a good cue to start with?
sould i get a different cue for breaking?
what sould i look for in a cue?
are those tip pricky things good for your cue tip?


i like to play all games,but really like 9-ball.sould i get a cue just for 9-ball?

on a side note,i really dont have much money to spend on a cue/cues but do want a nice one.i,dd probally be able to spend about $150:00 or so on one.i think i sould be able to get a nice cue for that.

thank you all for any advice you can offer /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Snapshot9
10-14-2007, 05:32 AM
Well, Players or Lucasi are good starter cues, or these Schmelke cues; (look at the R060 or R080)

Schmelke cues - R060 or R080 (http://www.billiardswarehouse.com/cues/schmelke/schmelke_sneaky_pete_cues.htm)

pooltchr
10-14-2007, 07:46 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr> hello guys and gals /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif
i,ve had my 7ft table for like 5 years,but i only recently started to really get into the billiards world.i think i shoot pretty good for someone with only one eye /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif but i want to improve my game. <font color="red"> The best advice for improvement is to find a good instructor to help. </font color> i just have k-mart cue sticks at the moment,but i would like to get a nice one and wanted to ask for advice.
i just read in another thread here about different types of cue tips.i forget who posted the reply but they said a flater tip was for billiards and a rounder tip was better for 9-ball for spin. <font color="red"> Most cues $100 and up are going to come with a good leather tip that should work just fine. </font color>
what would be a good cue to start with?
<font color="red"> Sterling, Fury, Players, Lucasi all have cues in your price range that would be suitable. </font color>
sould i get a different cue for breaking?
<font color="red"> If you can afford a second cue, yes. If not, grab a house cue off the wall, and use it. Breaking with your playing cue shouldn't hurt the cue, but it can require a little more work to keep your tip in shape. </font color>
what sould i look for in a cue?
<font color="red"> A good straight maple shaft, and a joint that uses stainless steel rather than brass for the fittings. </font color>
are those tip pricky things good for your cue tip?
<font color="red"> Not really. Used in excess, they break up the fibers in the leather. A tapper will put little dimples in the tip and allow it to hold chalk. Remember, it only needs to hold chalk for one shot, as long as you chalk before every shot (recommended!) </font color>


i like to play all games,but really like 9-ball.sould i get a cue just for 9-ball? <font color="red"> I use the same cue regardless of the game. There really isn't a cue designed for different pool games, with the possible exception of snooker or billiards </font color>

on a side note,i really dont have much money to spend on a cue/cues but do want a nice one.i,dd probally be able to spend about $150:00 or so on one.i think i sould be able to get a nice cue for that. <font color="red"> Agreed. </font color>

thank you all for any advice you can offer /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif <hr /></blockquote>
<font color="red"> A cue is just a piece of wood you use to move the cue ball. If it's straight and has a good tip, it will work. It's knowing how to use it properly that really makes a difference in your game.
Steve </font color>

joepool
10-14-2007, 11:14 AM
I agree with Steve's reply. Get a decent straight cue that feels Ok to you, and get some guidance on how to use it.
Good mechanics at the beginning can save you a lot of time on the learning curve.
/ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Scott Lee
10-14-2007, 11:30 AM
I agree with joepool and pooltchr. The cue matters little without some good direction on how to best use it. If I were you, I'd look in some pawn shops or pool rooms for a good used cue. You should be able to find something to fill your needs for about $50. Then spend the other $100 on some lessons from a qualified instructor.

Scott Lee

bradb
10-14-2007, 02:37 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr> hello guys and gals /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif
i,ve had my 7ft table for like 5 years,but i only recently started to really get into the billiards world.i think i shoot pretty good for someone with only one eye /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif but i want to improve my game.i just have k-mart cue sticks at the moment,but i would like to get a nice one and wanted to ask for advice.
i just read in another thread here about different types of cue tips.i forget who posted the reply but they said a flater tip was for billiards and a rounder tip was better for 9-ball for spin.
what would be a good cue to start with?
sould i get a different cue for breaking?
what sould i look for in a cue?
are those tip pricky things good for your cue tip?


i like to play all games,but really like 9-ball.sould i get a cue just for 9-ball?

on a side note,i really dont have much money to spend on a cue/cues but do want a nice one.i,dd probally be able to spend about $150:00 or so on one.i think i sould be able to get a nice cue for that.

thank you all for any advice you can offer /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Here's my 2 cents.
150 bucks will get you a decent cue and case. Instructors are best... but if thats to expensive, maybe get a good pool instruction video or DVD. You can order them off the net or your local billiard store will probably have them. Some players on this forum can tell you which are the best, but if its from a known pro then you can be sure its good. Make sure its for a beginner and not for an advanced player.-Brad

_brad

1Time
10-14-2007, 03:04 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr> hello guys and gals /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif
i,ve had my 7ft table for like 5 years,but i only recently started to really get into the billiards world.i think i shoot pretty good for someone with only one eye /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif but i want to improve my game. <hr /></blockquote>
The first best thing to do to improve your game is to get instruction. Being around better players and imitating their stroke and play will help. Reading the material on this site and the other sites and material that are frequently linked to from this site will help. Starting a thread on this site that's focused on "help me improve my game" would help. Just keep posting what problems you're having and ask for help. The more specific you are, the better.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr> i just have k-mart cue sticks at the moment,but i would like to get a nice one and wanted to ask for advice.
i just read in another thread here about different types of cue tips.i forget who posted the reply but they said a flater tip was for billiards and a rounder tip was better for 9-ball for spin. <hr /></blockquote>
You can have a tip of your liking put on any cue and shape it however you like, so don't buy a cue just for the tip that comes with it.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr>what would be a good cue to start with? <hr /></blockquote>
A good cue to start with for around $150 or less is one that's not likely to warp and one that you've shot around with and determined it plays well for you. I shot some of the best pool I've ever shot on a bar box last night with a $75 Players cue that I had never shot with before. It felt nearly perfect. The connection between this cue, where I wanted the CB to go as I shot the object ball, where the object ball then went, and where the CB then moved around the table was uncanny. It was as if I only needed to think what I wanted to have happen and it did. I only missed shots when I attempted to compensate (out of habit) as I usually have to do with other cues. This cue "completed me" LOL. Normally with a new cue I find myself compensating in one way or another to adapt to it, which negatively affects my stroke and game. Buying a cue without first shooting around with it very likely will require you to adapt to it, instead of it seeming to be made especially for you, as it should be. And this is not to to say a custom cue can be designed to do this for any one player. Custom cue makers sell this illusion. So if you're not first going to shoot around with several cues to help you get a feel for what works for you, then just about any cue for $150 or less from the more popular production cue makers is likely to work as well as any other.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr>sould i get a different cue for breaking? <hr /></blockquote>
If you don't have any other cue available to use for breaking, don't even bother breaking for a while. I don't recommend breaking with your playing cue since this is prone to flattening its tip to a shape other than what works best for the rest of your game. Just focus on buying your playing cue and getting it to shoot well for you. That is paramount, and that may require more from your pool budget than your initial purchase. So if you don't want to go over budget, I recommend not spending the whole $150 at once. And then when you're satisfied with your playing cue, look into getting a break cue with the money left in your budget. There's not much to a good break cue besides the tip and weight that's going to make a noticeable difference. A cue that's going to work well for a 9 ball break can be had new or used for as little as $10 to $50.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr>what sould i look for in a cue? <hr /></blockquote>
One thing to look for is something that's going to protect it against warping, like the manufacturing process or technology used to prevent warping, or at least a warranty against warping. Other main things to consider are the type of joint, type of wrap, the cue's weight and balance, the length of the pro taper, the diameter of the shaft's taper and ferrule, and whether the cue has a bolt that can be changed to vary the cue's weight and balance. Other than that you'll need to be shooting with the cue first to see how well it shoots for you.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr>are those tip pricky things good for your cue tip? <hr /></blockquote>
I have a tip pricker super glued to the back of a tip tapper, that way I can tap the pricker on the cue's tip instead of having to press it down. It's easier and faster to use that way. However, what I've found is if a cue and tip are working for me, I have no use for messing with the cue's tip. Just chalk it on every shot. And that's the way a good tip and cue are supposed to work, and what may work well for one person may not for another. But if I'm miscuing or concerned that I will, I will use the pricker in hopes that it will help, but it never seems to be enough. It just takes too much out of my game to be concerned for whether I'm going to miscue. The correct solution is to get a cue and tip that works well in the first place and chalk it on every shot. A dime and nickel combo shaper is all that should be needed to maintain the top of a tip.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr>i like to play all games,but really like 9-ball.sould i get a cue just for 9-ball? <hr /></blockquote>
Ideally your cue should be tailored to your 9-ball game since that is your primary game. And, ideally your cue should be tailored to whether you shoot primarily on a 7' or 9' table.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr>on a side note,i really dont have much money to spend on a cue/cues but do want a nice one.i,dd probally be able to spend about $150:00 or so on one.i think i sould be able to get a nice cue for that. <hr /></blockquote>
Yes, you can get a nice cue for $150. However, you are far more likely to determine what cue plays well for you by shooting around with a variety of cues than you are by buying one based on its cost. Said another way, you are far more likely to find a new cue that shoots well for you by shooting around with a variety that sell new from $50 to $100, than you are by buying a new cue for around $150 that you have not first shot with.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr>thank you all for any advice you can offer /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif <hr /></blockquote>
Your welcome.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr><font color="red"> A cue is just a piece of wood you use to move the cue ball. If it's straight and has a good tip, it will work. It's knowing how to use it properly that really makes a difference in your game.
Steve </font color> <hr /></blockquote>
Even warped house cue will work, however a careful selection of a cue stick and tip can make quite an appreciable difference, even for a beginner. And that difference is more likely to become greater as a player improves.

Rich R.
10-14-2007, 07:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bradb:</font><hr> Instructors are best... but if thats to expensive, maybe get a good pool instruction video or DVD. <hr /></blockquote>
Videos and DVD's are good, but they can't watch what you are doing and tell you what you are doing wrong. Go for the instructor. I wish they were available when I was learning.

mantis
10-14-2007, 10:15 PM
I agree that instruction will help more than a cue. However, I do like "Players" cues. I can also recommend www.dominiakcues.com. (http://www.dominiakcues.com.) His beginning level custom cues are the best value around, and are in your price range.

9baller
10-15-2007, 01:16 AM
thank you all every much for all this great info.it really helps /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

[ QUOTE ]
Ideally your cue should be tailored to your 9-ball game since that is your primary game. And, ideally your cue should be tailored to whether you shoot primarily on a 7' or 9' table.
<hr /></blockquote>
this is a very interesting point i did not think of.i have a 7ft now,but one day i would love to have a regulation size table,but,i,dd also like for it to rain $100:00 bills around me,but i dont think thats gonna happen any time soon /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

pooltchr
10-15-2007, 04:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr>
Ideally your cue should be tailored to your 9-ball game since that is your primary game. And, ideally your cue should be tailored to whether you shoot primarily on a 7' or 9' table.

<hr /></blockquote>

I would be interested to know what you think should be different in a cue used on a 7'foot table as opposed to a 9' table. The cue should fit the player...not the table. And what would be different in a cue for a 9-ball player from that for an 8-ball player?
Steve

BLACKHEART
10-15-2007, 08:32 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr>
Ideally your cue should be tailored to your 9-ball game since that is your primary game. And, ideally your cue should be tailored to whether you shoot primarily on a 7' or 9' table.

I would agree EXCEPT,one of the leagues I play in has the same cloth on all of the 7' tables. Recently one of the taverns installed an extreamly fast cloth on their tables.
No one on our team could control the speed of the white ball. I used a lighter Q on these tables lately &amp; have had much better results...JER <hr /></blockquote>

I would be interested to know what you think should be different in a cue used on a 7'foot table as opposed to a 9' table. The cue should fit the player...not the table. And what would be different in a cue for a 9-ball player from that for an 8-ball player?
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

1Time
10-15-2007, 10:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr>I would be interested to know what you think should be different in a cue used on a 7'foot table as opposed to a 9' table. The cue should fit the player...not the table. And what would be different in a cue for a 9-ball player from that for an 8-ball player?
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

A cue should definitely fit the individual, but one need not be limited to a single cue for use with all games or on all table sizes. Ideally one should be encouraged to determine what works best for them for any game or any table size, whatever works best. And, it is far from ideal to discourage a player from doing so by instructing them to use one cue for all pocket billiard games or for all pool table sizes.

The differences in cues one may find that works best for shooting different games or shooting on different sized tables can be as varied as an individual may determine or consider to be real. These differences can range from the psychological "my lucky 9-ball cue" or "this is my 9-ball cue" to those an individual determines to be based on observable performance. Of course this is not to say one could not conclude after comparing various cues that their main cue performs the best at all games and table sizes. It simply is ideal to tailor one's cue to their game of choice and choice of table size, whether that means using one or more cues.

I own only one cue because I by far prefer playing 9-ball on a 9' table. However, if I had a serious need for playing 8-ball on a 7' table, for example, ideally I would be looking for a cue that plays 8-ball for me on a 7' table than my 9-ball cue. And, I would suspect such a cue would be 1" shorter, lighter, a different brand and color, and have its tip shaped different than the tip on my 9-ball cue. Your milage definitely will vary.

Scott Lee
10-15-2007, 11:09 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr>I would be interested to know what you think should be different in a cue used on a 7'foot table as opposed to a 9' table. The cue should fit the player...not the table. And what would be different in a cue for a 9-ball player from that for an 8-ball player?
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

A cue should definitely fit the individual, but one need not be limited to a single cue for use with all games or on all table sizes. Ideally one should be encouraged to determine what works best for them for any game or any table size, whatever works best. And, it is far from ideal to discourage a player from doing so by instructing them to use one cue for all pocket billiard games or for all pool table sizes.

The differences in cues one may find that works best for shooting different games or shooting on different sized tables can be as varied as an individual may determine or consider to be real. These differences can range from the psychological "my lucky 9-ball cue" or "this is my 9-ball cue" to those an individual determines to be based on observable performance. Of course this is not to say one could not conclude after comparing various cues that their main cue performs the best at all games and table sizes. It simply is ideal to tailor one's cue to their game of choice and choice of table size, whether that means using one or more cues.

I own only one cue because I by far prefer playing 9-ball on a 9' table. However, if I had a serious need for playing 8-ball on a 7' table, for example, ideally I would be looking for a cue that plays 8-ball for me on a 7' table than my 9-ball cue. And, I would suspect such a cue would be 1" shorter, lighter, a different brand and color, and have its tip shaped different than the tip on my 9-ball cue. Your milage definitely will vary. <hr /></blockquote>

This is some of the most convoluted "advice" that I've seen here. I guess those guys who play ALL games with the same cue (insert any of about 1000 names here) must not know what the heck they're doing, huh? I happen to be in the 'one-cue-fits-all' club too, and imo, it's absurd to suggest to a new player that you need different cues for different games (3-C excepted...but that can be played with a pool cue too), or even different size tables!

Scott Lee

1Time
10-15-2007, 11:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> This is some of the most convoluted "advice" that I've seen here. I guess those guys who play ALL games with the same cue (insert any of about 1000 names here) must not know what the heck they're doing, huh? I happen to be in the 'one-cue-fits-all' club too, and imo, it's absurd to suggest to a new player that you need different cues for different games (3-C excepted...but that can be played with a pool cue too)!

Scott Lee <hr /></blockquote>

No, Scott Lee, please state what you really think. lol

You must have misunderstood what I've written. Perhaps re-reading it will change your tune.

okinawa77
10-15-2007, 12:33 PM
Sounds like someone is trying to sell some cues...

For fast clothes, use a lighter cue. This will help you reduce your cue ball speed.

For slow clothes, use a heavier cue. This will help you get more cue ball speed.

Or.....get a cue that is in the middle. Mid-weight is versatile enough to play on fast and slow tables with a little adjustment of your stroke strength.

Cydpkt
10-15-2007, 01:02 PM
How about different tips for different cloth or brands of balls?

Hey to get back to the topic of your question, instruction is a huge help. Practice is a big help. If you find yourself tired and just hitting the balls around you are hurting your game. Give your practice 100% if you can't give 100% step away and come back later. There is no need to start a bad habit that causes more frustration to straighten out. If you see a great shot on TV try to practice that shot until you can do it. Watch other players and ask questions.

BigRigTom
10-15-2007, 01:39 PM
At the risk of upsetting a few of the regular posters on this forum...
I would recommend you get Dr. Dave's book and read over the supporting material on his web site.
It took me 40 years to stumble onto it and it would have been great if someone had just mentioned half of that stuff along the way.
Also be careful about asking for advise from and watching other players, they all have a different way of accomplishing the same thing and most of those ways work fine for that individual but may not work at all for you and most likely that individual will either explain it wrong or realize he or she doesn't even understand it them selves.....this is what I did manage to learn over those 40 odd years of floundering unguided in the real pool world.

Cydpkt
10-15-2007, 01:56 PM
Tom I agree with you I just think that it is OK to recognize there is or are more tan one path to get to your next ball. I shoot what I am comfortable with but there are times I will take the slightly harder shot to avoid a possible hook on myself. I have my way but think it is important to understand why someone else choose to go a different way. I should have mentioned in my response was to watch how people move the cue ball around. For beginners the basics are the way to start. Good fundamentals will make learning a lot easier.

SKennedy
10-15-2007, 02:52 PM
In fact, sometimes how well I'm shooting will dictate which shot I take next, etc.

wolfdancer
10-15-2007, 04:48 PM
Scott, only 2 games I know of that require a second cue, from your regular one to play with...Billiards, and snooker (snooker balls, and a 12 ft table)
I've never seen a good player switch cues, when switching from 8 to 9 ball, or even one pocket, and the only reason I can see using a shorter cue on the bar box...is if you are playing in a bar without enough clearance for your reg cue.
But I play 3 different courses here...I might just get me a different set of clubs for each one, and see if that helps me break 100.
I regularly tell all my friends about the help I got from your lesson..."he adjusted my stance and foot position, showed me how to sight the target, changed my grip, straightened out my arm swing, improved my focus and aim....and now I regularly bowl in the 160's" /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
A friend of mine teaches,has worked with you, and has high regards for your teaching ability....
now about them shirts....

9baller
10-15-2007, 05:50 PM
all the info you guys have shared is very helpful.thank you very much /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
although i dont think my hero allison fisher needs to be afriad of playing me just yet !!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

PS.anyone know where i can get a pic of allison for use in a avtar/siggie?

KellyStick
10-15-2007, 06:17 PM
I can't add much to all of this except the following, potentially incorrect observation. It feels like most of your pool is shot on your table at home. May not be true. BUt get out of the house. Join a league. Enter a tournament or just go shoot at the local pool hall. Ask others shooting by themselves if they wanna play a game. Watch out for hustlers but this should not be a big deal in most places. MAke some pool friends. Talk about the game. Try out their pool sticks and treat them kindly when you do. Start getting a feel for what is out their in real life. You'll then develop some of your own beliefs and you can experiment and test them out. There are no clear answers. Try new things.

9baller
10-15-2007, 06:30 PM
kellystick,you are %100 corect!!
the problem is i had to leave where i was living in jersey and i,mm staying with my sis in PA for awhile and i cant really get out much right now cause i dont drive and you really need a car in this area.but i do want to get out to a pool hall to meet players i can play and learn from.maybe even join a league.i see a web site on the tourniments on tv about finding a league by me (anyone) but i forget the site at the moment. maybe poolplayers.com,but i cant think of it right now.
i was actully thinking of posting here if there are any members in the pocono PA area that would like to meet up to play.there is a pool hall a few miles away,but i dont know the name,i,ll look in the phone book to see if i can find it

ripper144
11-06-2007, 01:26 AM
The best place to buy a quality beginner cue is through one of the major Billiard supply companies such as Muellers, or Billiards warehouse. Look in between each major billard cue companies page displays and you will find deals such as a basic quality mueller maple cue w/ case, and several other low priced cue companies that you have never heard of. Muellers and B. Warehouse knows exactly who makes these products and why they are better than a kmart cue.