PDA

View Full Version : Position of cue ball after break



Drop1
10-24-2007, 07:05 PM
There have been posts,stressing knowing where the cue ball,is going to end up after the break. Most of the time,mine ends up in a pocket,however,that aside,what does it matter,unless it is in relationship to the position of the other balls,and you controlled where those balls end up.

Bob_Jewett
10-24-2007, 07:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> There have been posts,stressing knowing where the cue ball,is going to end up after the break. Most of the time,mine ends up in a pocket,however,that aside,what does it matter,unless it is in relationship to the position of the other balls,and you controlled where those balls end up. <hr /></blockquote>
Some spots for the cue ball are, on average, worse than others. If you are playing eight ball, leaving the cue ball in the jaws of a head pocket is bad. If you are playing nine ball, leaving the cue ball in the middle of the foot rail is bad, especially if the one ball is ending in the kitchen on every break. It's an average leave, not a specific leave.

But one time I was watching Allison Fisher in a WPBA tournament, and I could swear that she was playing position on the two ball on the break and making the one in the side.

Also, as you keep seeing, it is bad to let the cue ball touch a cushion on the break since there might happen to be a pocket there.

071838
10-24-2007, 07:23 PM
I'd say it matters in the sense that, at any given time in any given form of pool, center table is very likely an efficient place for your cue ball to park. It simply offers you more options. And it also gives you a far wiser objective than a mere hit-and-hope: with a cue-ball destination in mind, you'll be far more likely to treat the break as another form of controlled, disciplined stroke, one with a definite beginning, middle and end. Hope this helps. GF

Snapshot9
10-25-2007, 05:57 AM
It all depends on how you break. Now, I have 8 breaks for 9 ball (4 each on each side). Having only 1 or 2 breaks 'sets' yourself up to get beat, especially by someone that can 'rack'.

Most of the time, I find drawing the cue ball back uptable with my break, will end up with a good shot on the one because the one ball comes uptable on the opposite half of the table, and leaves me a good shot in the 2 hole (Golf players on snooker table know which hole this is). And this is a very repeatable break with good results.

Now, if I was to break, and keep the cue mid table, the one might be on the uptable end rail, and be a much more difficult shot to shoot, or I might have to roll out or play safe. Although staying in mid table increases the probabilities of having a shot, it does not always yield the best shot because consideration is not being given to where the 1 ball will end up.

ceebee
10-26-2007, 06:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Snapshot9:</font><hr> It all depends on how you break. Now, I have 8 breaks for 9 ball (4 each on each side). Having only 1 or 2 breaks 'sets' yourself up to get beat, especially by someone that can 'rack'.

Most of the time, I find drawing the cue ball back uptable with my break, will end up with a good shot on the one because the one ball comes uptable on the opposite half of the table, and leaves me a good shot in the 2 hole (Golf players on snooker table know which hole this is). And this is a very repeatable break with good results.

Now, if I was to break, and keep the cue mid table, the one might be on the uptable end rail, and be a much more difficult shot to shoot, or I might have to roll out or play safe. Although staying in mid table increases the probabilities of having a shot, it does not always yield the best shot because consideration is not being given to where the 1 ball will end up. <hr /></blockquote>

What you say is very true. Building your knowledge base can only help you understand the Break Shot &amp; the variations or combinations therein.

Bert Kinister did a video on the "The 1 on the Break Shot &amp; position on the 2-Ball". (this is a paraphrased title).

Joe Tucker has some wonderful knowledge about the Break Shot, that he has shared with lots of players.

av84fun
11-08-2007, 02:09 AM
Attempting to "squat the rock" in the general center of the table results in the CB being as close to any given position on the table as possible.

Of course, the CB can get kicked out of the center but that's the...ummm..."breaks of the game."

But if the 1 ball is not going in the side pocket, then the odds heavily favor it ending up table. If the 1 is not dropping, the wing ball often will and when that is the case I am quite sure that many pros will intentionally draw the CB back up table so it ends up in the same neighborhood as the 1 ball.

Of course, scratching in one of the up table corners is a risk.

Regards,
Jim

Qtec
11-08-2007, 11:16 AM
[ QUOTE ]
But one time I was watching Allison Fisher in a WPBA tournament, and I could swear that she was playing position on the two ball on the break and making the one in the side. <hr /></blockquote>

I've seen that as well but it was another match. If the 1 is going in the side pocket almost every time[ new cloth and Sardo] it makes sense to play for the 2.

Q

Billy_Bob
11-08-2007, 11:40 AM
When playing 8 ball, after the break, one group may be a better choice than another (solids/stripes).

Say after the break, every solid ball has a clear path to a pocket, but stripes has a cluster and is blocked from going into a pocket by a solid.

Then solids would be the best choice to take. If you have left the cue ball in the central area of the table after the break, then chances are that you will have a shot at a solid OR a stripe. Then you can pick the group which is best. So in this case you could shoot in a solid and go on from there. And have a possibility of a break and run.

Now it would be the pitts if in the above case the cue ball was left at the head or foot of the table and the only shot you had was a stripe! Then you get to that cluster or blocked ball and can't do anything. Then your opponent easily runs out. Not good...