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DeadCrab
10-30-2007, 11:19 AM
I'm not looking to re-open the always controversial eye dominance issue. However, I recently had sort of a skill regression and higher variability of delivering the cue ball to the aim point. One thing that has come to light as I was troubleshooting this is that I found that my dominant eye shifts from right to left throughout the day. Tried closing my right eye (I shoot left), and just got headaches and loss of depth perception.

Found this article:
http://www.aashooting.com/Wing_Clay_Flyer/05Summer/WCFSummer05_files/Page725.htm

and have found the solutions for shifting-dominance and partial cross dominance to be interesting.

Tried the tape on the glasses thing last night, and it kept me on my left eye dominance, and I still had depth perception. Might be worth a try for others with same problem.

Get over the cue like you are shooting and close the eye that wont be blocked. You can use a fingertip (put in different locations on the glasses lens till it obscures the cue, cueball, and object ball) to find out where your central vision spot is for the eye you want to block. It only takes about a square cm of tape to block the central vision of all this, so you still see plenty out of the blocked eye.

Fran Crimi
10-30-2007, 12:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr>
I'm not looking to re-open the always controversial eye dominance issue. However, I recently had sort of a skill regression and higher variability of delivering the cue ball to the aim point. One thing that has come to light as I was troubleshooting this is that I found that my dominant eye shifts from right to left throughout the day. Tried closing my right eye (I shoot left), and just got headaches and loss of depth perception.

Found this article:
http://www.aashooting.com/Wing_Clay_Flyer/05Summer/WCFSummer05_files/Page725.htm

and have found the solutions for shifting-dominance and partial cross dominance to be interesting.

Tried the tape on the glasses thing last night, and it kept me on my left eye dominance, and I still had depth perception. Might be worth a try for others with same problem.

Get over the cue like you are shooting and close the eye that wont be blocked. You can use a fingertip (put in different locations on the glasses lens till it obscures the cue, cueball, and object ball) to find out where your central vision spot is for the eye you want to block. It only takes about a square cm of tape to block the central vision of all this, so you still see plenty out of the blocked eye.
<hr /></blockquote>


I don't think that what you're experiencing is a shift in dominant eye. A dominant eye is an eye that has more neuro pathways that go straight back to the brain as opposed to criss-crossing, than the other eye has. So a dominant eye is actually a pysiological thing which doesn't change as far as I know --- or at least not quickly. I guess it depends on whether these neuro pathways are capable of changing and if so, how long it takes for the change to take place. I've always understood that it takes a very long time to grow a new nerve and sometimes it can't be done. An eye doctor student of mine once told me the whole dominant eye thing is still somewhat of a mystery to the medical profession --- what causes it, etc.

I suppose your dominant eye can become tired during the day, and I suspect it may be a pathological issue. I guess an eye doctor can tell you more.

Fran

1Time
10-30-2007, 02:08 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr>
I'm not looking to re-open the always controversial eye dominance issue.
<hr /></blockquote>

If your dominant eye changes, all you need to do is monkey around with the alignment of your head over the cue stick until it looks right or works better for you. And so, you may have to use two different set ups, one for the use of each dominant eye. That would drive me nuts.

DeadCrab
10-30-2007, 02:21 PM
The problem is, I can't tell which eye is dominant at the moment without testing it. With occlusion of my right eye central vision, the left eye will have to be dominant, which is what is best for a left handed pool player.

The usual knock against patching or closing the opposite eye is that you lose depth perception. With the taped lens, peripheral vision, and depth perception are preserved.

So that is where I want to be: left eye dominant with depth perception.

I'm too old to put the right side of my chin on the left side of the cue, anyway.

1Time
10-30-2007, 03:14 PM
I shoot right handed with my head tilted a little to the right and forward. This puts my left eye slightly higher and more forward than my right eye. I do this because it's what I have found to work best for me.

If your eye dominance changes and you can't tell the difference in how you sight a shot, then disregard the problem and play on. However, if you can tell the difference, and you should be able to immediately tell whether you are sighting the shots the same or not, then find an alternative and better way to orient your head and eyes. And then, choose which ever way, the original or the new, that works better for you at any given time.

KellyStick
10-30-2007, 03:29 PM
I've seen two players, both we very good, shoot with they're nose lined up right over the top of the stick. apparently no dominant eye or both equal. I dunno? Anyone know what that might mean? It looks kinda freaky and cross-eyedish to see head on.

1Time
10-30-2007, 03:31 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> I've seen two players, both we very good, shoot with they're nose lined up right over the top of the stick. apparently no dominant eye or both equal. I dunno? Anyone know what that might mean? It looks kinda freaky and cross-eyedish to see head on. <hr /></blockquote>

That means that's probably what each found to work best for them.

cushioncrawler
10-30-2007, 03:51 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr>...Get over the cue like you are shooting and close the eye that wont be blocked. You can use a fingertip (put in different locations on the glasses lens till it obscures the cue, cueball, and object ball) to find out where your central vision spot is for the eye you want to block. It only takes about a square cm of tape to block the central vision of all this, so you still see plenty out of the blocked eye.<hr /></blockquote>Crusty -- What if u aint got glasses?? I think that the problem (if it exizts) and solution are in your glasses. Are theze special? Are the optikal centers in the correct place? Are they for intermediate distance? Or are they your street glasses? madMac.

DeadCrab
10-30-2007, 04:00 PM
******************
Crusty -- What if u aint got glasses?? I think that the problem (if it exizts) and solution are in your glasses. Are theze special? Are the optikal centers in the correct place? Are they for intermediate distance? Or are they your street glasses? madMac.
***************************
For pool playing I use my current Rx in a 1990's vintage frame with those big lenses. Both eyes have the same Rx and correct to 20/15.

Now the right lens has a piece of tape in the upper quadrant next to my nose. That is where it has to be to get the central vision of the right eye when I look down the cue.

Looks a bit silly, but it's not like I wear them in public. Some of the shooters who do this (and it is a common technique in skeet/trap shooting) find they can abandon the tape after a while.

SKennedy
10-31-2007, 12:17 PM
I shoot quite a bit (shotguns)..skeet, clay pigeons, dove, ducks, and geese and I do find eye dominance of some importance since I shoot right-handed but I'm left eye dominant. However, shooting with a shotgun with both eyes open minimizes the dominant effect. I don't look down the barrel and only look at the leading edge of my target. The only time I think the eye dominance thing is important is in crossing shots. When the target is crossing right to left, I get right on the target with very little lead. However, on left to right crosses the lead is greatly increased.
Since I've seen this subject before relative to pool, I tried to determine if it had any impact on my billiard game. I was hopeful that the eye dominance issue would be important for me and explain why I miss, could correct the problem by moving my head, and instantly turn pro. Such was not the case and I feel that eye dominance does not affect me. Again, I'm right-handed with a left eye dominance and when I get over the stick, my left eye seems to be over the sight plane more than the right eye. It feels comfortable to me and don't know if this is normal for most players or if it is an unconscious compensation on my part. Maybe pool is more natural for someone who is right-handed and left eye dominant?
Don't know if we have any experts on the subject or not out there, but would like to learn more about it. I know that someone on here did mention there was not sure way to determine which eye is dominant or not and I disagree strongly with that statement. In shooting sports it is an important subject.

okinawa77
11-01-2007, 08:47 AM
My eyes also change dominance. I theorize that is has to do with the fact that I am ambiodextrous. I use my left and right hand equally as well.
I simply line up the cue between both eyes. I am a pretty consistent shooter.

av84fun
11-03-2007, 10:52 PM
I don't think that "shifting eye dominance" affects most sports and certainly not pool. The noted publication Journal of Vision has an article on that subject which I have provided a link to below.

You will note that according to them...and they ARE the authority, shifting dominance only occurs when the viewer looks in different directions. In other words, you might be right eye dominant when looking to the left and left eye dominant when looking to the right.

But Fran is correct that when you site down a pool cue, or a gun, (and I was a competitive skeet shooter with 125 straight and 174 out of 175 to my credit) eye dominance does not change.

In addition, Niels Feijen is living proof that pure binocular vision is not necessary. What IS necessary is that your sight picture remains constant! In other words, in theory at least, you can get used to ANY sight picture as long as it is consistent...which is why some people can shoot a gun...over their shoulder backwards looking into a mirror and his a distand bulls eye. (Don't try this at home).

If I were you, I wouldn't worry about eye dominance...shifting or otherwise and presume any errors you commit are the result in some flaw in your mechanics and/or basic knowledge. The odds are 100-1 that that is your problem and not eye dominance.

Regards,
Jim

http://www.journalofvision.org/2/7/326/

DeadCrab
11-04-2007, 07:28 AM
This article confirms what has previously been published.
Quoting the authors:

"The results showed, in agreement with Khan and Crawford, that the left eye was more dominant when the eyes were turned leftward and the right eye more dominant when they were turned rightward. The results also showed that relative image magnification affected dominance. For example, when the eyes were turned rightward, but the image was larger in the left eye, dominance shifted toward the left eye. We conclude that the shift in eye dominance that occurs with viewing direction is caused by both eye position and relative image magnification."

What happens for a left-shooter, right eye-dominant in pool, is that the right eye tends to seek the target, and for a leftie, this means that the right eye deviates rightward and into dominance. So, the right eye, not over the stick, becomes dominant, and the problems begin.

The findings of this article, and others, are totally consistent with the sighting problems encountered by cross dominant pool players and shooters.

Since I originally posted this, my experience with the blocking of my right central vision is that it allowed me to see that my head was deviated to the left when I was getting ready to shoot. Now that I am developing a feel for "proper" head position, I find I don't need the tape on the glasses. Nonetheless, it has been a help in diagnosing and fixing the problem.

My guess is that your shooting is done with your dominant eye looking down the sight. Put that gun on the other shoulder and see how it goes.

SKennedy
11-04-2007, 06:56 PM
Again, I'm not a great skeet shooter, but my left eye dominance does affect me as a right-handed shooter, but only at crossing shots with the 90 degree crossings the most challenging....as the angle decreases or increases from 90, the problem diminishes. For straight-away shots, going or coming, the eye thing is a moot point. I suspect this is the same for pool in that I am looking (or sighting) straight ahead.