PDA

View Full Version : Scott Lee Training



KellyStick
10-31-2007, 06:58 PM
All, I have heard from many on this site that professional training is a very good thing for anyone regardless of skill level and so on. Also, I have read from many on this site that Scott Lee is highly recommended by many. So I assume that some or many of you have received training from him. Well, based on your advice I have about 1/2 the APA pool team scheduled for Scott to come by and teach us something.

My question is basically directed at those that have paid for Scott to help them out.

My intention is not to critically evaluate Scott's training abilities in a public forum though that may be the result. My intent is to understand how I, as a student can benefit the most from the time we'll spend together. And most importantly getting feedback from those who have been there and done that, what I might ask or do different or prepare different or whatever for his brief time with us.

I am a bit reluctant to post this in some ways because it could get very personal for Scott. However, my impression is that he is confident in his abilities. Perhaps this is a chance for everyone who has met and paid for his help to provide feedback to me but maybe even to Scott himself.

I have no preconceived notions other than I am looking forward to this. But in the interest of free discussion and open, candid communication I would like to spend our collective dollars as wisely as possible. Basically I scheduled Scott and got some of the other members involved. They were ALL very willing by the way. I guess I feel a bit responsible there. I also truly believe that feedback is a good thing. I would respectively ask that any replies be constructive in nature. ON the other hand let's be honest and candid. I would appreciate that personally because I am cheap and based on my brief conversations with Scott as well as reading his posts I suspect he would appreciate honest feedback as well.

This could be a touchy post so let's be respectful please. But honest.

ras314
10-31-2007, 07:56 PM
Which hand do you want? You will get out about what you put into any training. Scott is quite patient and has a LOT of experience with students of all types. Work at what he recommends, study your video tapes over and over. They will be of benefit for many years.

Doesn't sound like you are much into gambling. My opinion of a lesson with him was man, I could have saved myself a ton of money and time had he been available back when I was playing. Now pool is just a hobby and Scott has made it a little more fun for me.

1Time
10-31-2007, 08:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> Well, based on your advice I have about 1/2 the APA pool team scheduled for Scott to come by and teach us something. <hr /></blockquote>

So is this training in a group, and if so, how many and for how long?

Fran Crimi
10-31-2007, 08:13 PM
[ QUOTE ]
ON the other hand let's be honest and candid. I would appreciate that personally because I am cheap <hr /></blockquote>

Well, I have to admit, it's the first time I've actually seen someone post that they are cheap. In fact, it appears that you are so cheap that you are unwilling to take even the slightest chance on Scott, but instead, would rather put him through something like this.


Fran

wolfdancer
10-31-2007, 10:52 PM
I'll be glad to give you an honest evaluation of my lesson with Scott, some 5 years ago. I had arranged for Scott to give
me and then my friend a lesson...so I was able to listen in on one lesson and then take one myself. Almost like getting two lessons for the price of one (I'm a little cheap myself)
The other guy thought afterwards that he had wasted his money, and I was disappointed myself. Scott was telling me things that I already knew, and showing me stuff I had already done before....I was looking for one thing, and he was teaching me another.
It wasn't until a few weeks later, after practicing some of the things he showed me, and watching myself on the tape, that I began to really appreciate the value of the lesson.
I had gone there looking for the "secret" to pocketing balls...Scott realized right away...I had no stroke, and weak fundamentals....and the stuff I already knew...I really didn't know, re: my setup and approach to the game. I think from that day forward, i began looking at the game in a different fashion....there was no overnite success to report, but I'm happy to say it was money well spent.
The other guy did waste his money....he had already taken lessons from a Master Instructor, but had his own ideas about the game....last I heard, he had given the game up.
Recently, a good friend of mine became a certified instructor, and has worked with Scott...and wrote me that the more he sees Scott giving lessons, the more he appreciates what a great instructor he is...and the more he learns from Scott about teaching. I think Scott's outstanding skill is in his ability to communicate...and in a relaxed fashion.
Now if you take the lesson, with one goal in mind, like I did, and find Scott having you work on something else....you'll be as disappointed as I was...originally.
By the way, I also saw Scott work for the week I was in LV...early on this year
and think he is an even better instructor now that he is associated with Cue-Tech and RandyG. They now really stress Fundamentals, and have a great way to teach them...
There might be one in your group that Scott can't help, because we all respond to learning differently...but if you all take the lesson, with the idea that he is going to help you, help yourselves ...it'll be money well spent.
(I wonder if he'll spring for a beer, next time we meet, after that endorsement?)

pooltchr
11-01-2007, 04:28 AM
The best thing you can do going into the lesson is to open your mind. Scott is going to give you more information than you can imagine, but if your mind is already full of "what you already know", there is no room for the new knowledge. Take what you learn, and incorporate it into your game over a few weeks following the lesson. If you do it, you will see the results. Not the next day, not the next week, but you will see the improvement.
Scott will take you where you need to go...but it may or may not be where you think you should go. You are paying him to do his job...let him do it.
Steve

mikepage
11-01-2007, 05:01 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> [...]

This could be a touchy post so let's be respectful please. But honest. <hr /></blockquote>

Ya know, you guys have already decided to take the plunge into the wading pool.

You've got one of the most respected instructors in the country lined up. Scott is not an unknown entity. There have been many players at all levels who have praised his insight and approach.

That said, one of the earmarks of a good instructor in any field is the ability to mold his approach to the student(s). In that sense, your experience won't be exactly the same as experiences of others.

I say there's nothing really to be gained here. If you get comments, most will be positive. History tells us that. Scott will say that he offers a refund to unsatisfied students, and nobody has taken him up on it. Can you tease out a few negative comments from people who didn't get exactly they expected? Perhaps. But I don't know what that's really going to tell you.

I say go into the lesson assuming it's going to be valuable, that you're fortunate enough to have one of the masters available.

Then tell us about the experience when you're done.

scaramouche
11-01-2007, 05:51 AM
I have taken a 3 day course with Randy G. He and Scott sometimes team up, so they teach the same way.

If you are looking for an instant fix look elsewhere.

It is not everything that is thrown at you during the course that will help you, but how you practice thereafter. Practice, don't play, until the techniques are ingrained and second nature.

Then start the refresher. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

randyg
11-01-2007, 06:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote scaramouche:</font><hr> I have taken a 3 day course with Randy G. He and Scott sometimes team up, so they teach the same way.

If you are looking for an instant fix look elsewhere.

It is not everything that is thrown at you during the course that will help you, but how you practice thereafter. Practice, don't play, until the techniques are ingrained and second nature.

Then start the refresher. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Scott is a proud member of our SPF teaching team. I beleive that Scott is one of the best Pool Instructors in the World. Your time with him has not been wasted.....SPF=randyg

randyg
11-01-2007, 06:29 AM
Your concern should not be about Scott's teaching ability but about your learning capabilities.

<font color="red">WHAT MAKES A GOOD STUDENT?</font color>

Listen and we learn.
Open Mind.
Take notes &amp; ask questions.
Understanding that just because it feels comfortable, doesn't make it right.
Work the Mother Drills slow and with purpose.
Be ready for personal repair time.
Patience &amp; Persistence.
Let the medicine have time to work.

SPF=randyg

randyg
11-01-2007, 06:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> All, I have heard from many on this site that professional training is a very good thing for anyone regardless of skill level and so on. Also, I have read from many on this site that Scott Lee is highly recommended by many. So I assume that some or many of you have received training from him. Well, based on your advice I have about 1/2 the APA pool team scheduled for Scott to come by and teach us something.

My question is basically directed at those that have paid for Scott to help them out.

My intention is not to critically evaluate Scott's training abilities in a public forum though that may be the result. My intent is to understand how I, as a student can benefit the most from the time we'll spend together. And most importantly getting feedback from those who have been there and done that, what I might ask or do different or prepare different or whatever for his brief time with us.

I am a bit reluctant to post this in some ways because it could get very personal for Scott. However, my impression is that he is confident in his abilities. Perhaps this is a chance for everyone who has met and paid for his help to provide feedback to me but maybe even to Scott himself.

I have no preconceived notions other than I am looking forward to this. But in the interest of free discussion and open, candid communication I would like to spend our collective dollars as wisely as possible. Basically I scheduled Scott and got some of the other members involved. They were ALL very willing by the way. I guess I feel a bit responsible there. I also truly believe that feedback is a good thing. I would respectively ask that any replies be constructive in nature. ON the other hand let's be honest and candid. I would appreciate that personally because I am cheap and based on my brief conversations with Scott as well as reading his posts I suspect he would appreciate honest feedback as well.

This could be a touchy post so let's be respectful please. But honest. <hr /></blockquote>

By the way.

I just conducted a Pool School in New Orleans and another in Houma. Too bad you missed us....SPF=randyg

Deeman3
11-01-2007, 07:32 AM
The little I can add is that Scott gives more time than he schedules and is more than worth the investment if you are a willing student. Many are not.

Rich R.
11-01-2007, 07:44 AM
Scott is a very good teacher and I'm sure you will enjoy the lesson.
Whether you take lessons from Scott or any other instructor, what is really important, if you want to improve, is what you and your teamates do after the lessons. If you practice and apply what you have learned, you will improve.

New2Pool
11-01-2007, 09:10 AM
Given that Scott mentions on this forum that he offers lessons I don't see anything wrong with someone asking about the experience of those who have taken lessons from him.

I am a middle-aged beginner and I took lessons from Scott at the end of this summer. It was money well spent. We had to start at the very basics and I was surprised at how little I knew. I thought I knew almost nothing but after working with Scott I found that in reality the few things that I thought I knew were wrong so I actually knew less than nothing!

I practiced in the way that Scott recommended for several months and I got where I could run 4 balls in 8-ball pretty often and I was not surprised when I ran 5 or 6. I have even run 8 once, which I don't think would have happened without the lessons.

I know that KellyStick is starting at a much higher level than I did so this information is not of much use for him. However, since there are probably some beginners on the board I thought I would let them know that it is never too early for lessons and that Scott does a great job.

bradb
11-01-2007, 09:23 AM
I don't know Scott but I like his posts, he impresses me with his incite.

I took lessons a while back and at first I thought we were covering too much ground that I already knew. but soon I realized that at any level its best to go back to the basics. Thats what this game is all about. So no matter what your skill level... listen and soak in every detail.

You will get out of it what you put in to it. -brad

Candyman
11-01-2007, 10:14 AM
I don't know why you are so skeptical. Scott guarantees lessons. If you aren't happy after two hours, you shake hands and walk away. How can you bet that? I have had an 8hr and 4hr lesson from Scott and couldn't be happier.

bsmutz
11-01-2007, 11:30 AM
Yes, Scott can be very inciteful with his posts, but not as bad as some. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif His lessons, on the other hand, are very insightful. I would suggest getting lots of sleep the day before Scott arrives and then plan to spend all day (and if you're lucky enough that he doesn't have to be anywhere before noon the next day, all night) learning and playing. You'll wear out long before he does. The only other suggestion I can offer is to write down anything specific that you have a question about or know that you need help with so that you can remember it once he gets there.

1Time
11-01-2007, 11:46 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> Well, based on your advice I have about 1/2 the APA pool team scheduled for Scott to come by and teach us something. <hr /></blockquote>

So is this training in a group, and if so, how many and for how long? <hr /></blockquote>

The reason I asked is it seems best if it were 1 on 1, with others having the option to watch each other's session.

And as to the length of time for one instructional session, I suggest the best bang for the buck would result from keeping it between 1 and 2 hours, after which it would be best to work on what's been instructed.

SKennedy
11-01-2007, 02:21 PM
I'm doing the same thing....getting him to come here and work with me and a few others. I assume he will be the one to determine what each of us needs to work on and I assume he is experienced, etc. If not, then it was a waste of money and shame on him. But, I'm willing to bet more than the fees of the lessons, that it will be time well-spent. If I don't get anything out of the lesson, then shame on me. I don't know what pool players charge for lessons, but I know that compared to other lesson fees he sounds very reasonable to me. I do agree with others posting here that what you have done may be a little harsh. I'm sure Scott would have given you some recent references, which I also see he has listed on his website.
I say invest a little money and find out. Otherwise, you'll never improve and not because of a lack of lessons...it's because you are not willing to step up! The worst that happens is he spends money to come see you and you spend money to play against a good player. Pool is not that expensive of a hobby compared to others. Invest a little into your game. Bet you'd spend that much on a new cue that some guy says will turn you into a better player with the same old poor stroke!

Wally_in_Cincy
11-01-2007, 02:51 PM
It has been 4 years since I took my 4-hour lesson from Scott. I am a much better player from having spent those 4 hours with him.

He's not a magic bullet though. He will show you how to improve but you have to apply the lessons after your session until they sink in (that dirty word "practice")

He will probably work on your stroke and mechanics mostly, which may not sound as romantic as masses and 2-rail banks, but you will appreciate it when you begin to beat people you have never beaten before.

You won't regret it.

randyg
11-01-2007, 02:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SKennedy:</font><hr> I'm doing the same thing....getting him to come here and work with me and a few others. I assume he will be the one to determine what each of us needs to work on and I assume he is experienced, etc. If not, then it was a waste of money and shame on him. But, I'm willing to bet more than the fees of the lessons, that it will be time well-spent. If I don't get anything out of the lesson, then shame on me. I don't know what pool players charge for lessons, but I know that compared to other lesson fees he sounds very reasonable to me. I do agree with others posting here that what you have done may be a little harsh. I'm sure Scott would have given you some recent references, which I also see he has listed on his website.
I say invest a little money and find out. Otherwise, you'll never improve and not because of a lack of lessons...it's because you are not willing to step up! The worst that happens is he spends money to come see you and you spend money to play against a good player. Pool is not that expensive of a hobby compared to others. Invest a little into your game. Bet you'd spend that much on a new cue that some guy says will turn you into a better player with the same old poor stroke!
<hr /></blockquote>

The #1 Pool School is right close to your back yard.

www.poolschool.info (http://www.poolschool.info)

CUE-TECH, home to 4 BCA Master Instructors. We do Road Shows once a month....SPF=randyg

Deeman3
11-01-2007, 02:59 PM
Give yourself a fair shot with at least a half day and consider randy and his pool school. A one or two hour lesson is good but you need to spend enough time to gather it all in and he will tape you as well.

SKennedy
11-01-2007, 03:21 PM
Tape me as well?....I'll have to lose weight and slim down first....the camera always adds 10 lbs.

SKennedy
11-01-2007, 03:24 PM
Thanks for the info Randy. I will try to follow up with the advice after the first of the year. I was not aware of it, but do remember seeing something in Dallas.

randyg
11-01-2007, 03:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SKennedy:</font><hr> Thanks for the info Randy. I will try to follow up with the advice after the first of the year. I was not aware of it, but do remember seeing something in Dallas. <hr /></blockquote>

Just stay in touch......randyg

KellyStick
11-01-2007, 03:39 PM
Answers and response to some posts.

This will all be one on ones not a group thing.

I mentioned that I was cheap and such but not as a way of showing concern about the money but more intent on knowing what I should do to get the most from this.

Some of you thought I was being skeptical of Scott's abilities. In fact, I chose him because of all the positive posts I have read on this forum. Once again I was wanting some first hand feed back on how to be a good student.

Someone mentioned that I should not be putting Scott through this public rating of his ability. Another mentioned that because Scott posts on this forum that he does training and is pretty verbal about it that having a sort of public discussion about his abilities should be OK. I tend to agree with the latter. But I was also concerned that this could turn into some sort of slugfest as some people are never happy with anyone. Scott, if you are reading this I meant no offense. And I am looking forward to our visit. And if someone does start a slugfest it looks like that would be a small majority. And with anyone that does anything worthwhile you are always going to have people that disagree, get angry, gripe and complain etc. My impression with Scott was that he could handle that.

Also, what I suspected has so far been true. All I have read was positive statements. Also, as I had hoped, I got some good advice. Like: Listen. Keep an open mind. Don't look for some silver bullet. Even if you don't understand why he is telling you something it may be that you don't know what you don't know. In fact that is a certainty. I can say for certain that I do not know what I don't know.

Also, as someone mentioned that there are different personalities and different ways people receive training or feedback. Since I have sort of set this up for the team I might be able to influence how we act while he is here. I was realy looking for advice from you all to make the most of our time. And not just because I am cheap. Sounds like I may personally have the most trouble unlearning bad habits that I think are good habits. I suspect I will have some of those. Anyway, thanks for the replies.

KellyStick
11-01-2007, 03:42 PM
Oops. I meant small minority, of course.

SKennedy
11-01-2007, 04:03 PM
Hey, I feel sorry for Scott and my hard-headed years of bad habits. He'll earn his money with me.

Qtec
11-01-2007, 09:48 PM
[ QUOTE ]
My intention is not to critically evaluate Scott's training abilities in a public forum though that may be the result. <hr /></blockquote>

I don't understand either of your two posts- at all! They seem to cancel each other out.
I also can't see the point of this thread and must I admit that your first post did seem like a subtle attack on Scott's reputation.

If you want to get the best out of this lesson, then play as you always do and listen to the advice he gives you. Above all, he needs your input, so when he asks you a Q give an honest answer. He is there to help you, not to judge you.

Have fun.

Q.

1Time
11-02-2007, 01:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr>
This could be a touchy post so let's be respectful please. But honest. <hr /></blockquote>

I can't believe people getting on KellyStick's case for starting this thread. All she's doing is asking for advise and honest opinions. I'd probably want to do the same if wanting pool instruction, and I'd expect and encourage folks here to do the same if I were providing pool instruction.

KellyStick
11-02-2007, 06:57 AM
Qtec, I don't understand your post either. But there you have it.. the written word. I never intended to attack anyone even in a subtle way. In fact that was what I wanted to avoid. Just the facts please.

Thanks for those who replied AND for those who stood up for Scott. I think this is the point where Scott aught to jump in and place his website link for everyone to give him a call since he obviously has a lot of fans, appreciative past students and dedicated friends.

See you in a few weeks Scott. I'm looking forward to it.

KellyStick
11-02-2007, 06:58 AM
by the way 1time. I'm not a girl. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Qtec
11-02-2007, 09:07 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I am a bit reluctant to post this in some ways because it could get very personal for Scott.<hr /></blockquote>

Then why do it?

[ QUOTE ]
However, my impression is that he is confident in his abilities. Perhaps this is a chance for everyone who has met and paid for his help to provide feedback to me but maybe even to Scott himself. <hr /></blockquote>

O boy.

[ QUOTE ]
Some of you thought I was being skeptical of Scott's abilities. In fact, I chose him because of all the positive posts I have read on this forum. Once again I was wanting some first hand feed back on how to be a good student. <hr /></blockquote>

You could have done that without mentioning Scott.

Q

wolfdancer
11-02-2007, 10:04 AM
Jerry: Oh, you don't understand, Osgood! Ehhhh... I'm a man.
Osgood: Well, nobody's perfect.

Last lines ...."Some Like It Hot" (1959) /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

1Time
11-02-2007, 10:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> by the way 1time. I'm not a girl. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif <hr /></blockquote>

My bad. No offense intended.

wolfdancer
11-02-2007, 10:35 AM
Kelly, I think maybe that you real concern is that you've "sold" Scott's teachings to the team. If that's the case, relax. They'll all enjoy meeting Scott and they'll all get something positive from the lesson...
He's been teaching pool longer than I've been playing pool,
(since Christ was in Kindergarten, was the old saying)
If he wasn't doing something right, you would have read a bunch of negative reports by now.
I watched player after player, take a free (abridged)lesson
from Scott, and the rest of the SPF family of instructors, for a few days in LV......I'd say they all left on a positive note, feeling they learned something that will help their game.
While the best way to learn, would be to enroll in one of the "intensive" 2 of 3 day programs, you'll all get enough bang for your buck, to satisfy spending that $$

KellyStick
11-02-2007, 11:06 AM
I think wolfdancer has got me pretty well pegged.

No offense taken 1time. I'm not that uptight over simple things like some people seem to be. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif I will say that in my lifetime poll I have met more guys named Kelly than girls. But it's just a name.

Deeman3
11-02-2007, 12:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> I think wolfdancer has got me pretty well pegged.

No offense taken 1time. I'm not that uptight over simple things like some people seem to be. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif I will say that in my lifetime poll I have met more guys named Kelly than girls. But it's just a name. <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> Yes, but I'd consider changing that last name from Stick. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif </font color>

KellyStick
11-02-2007, 12:36 PM
Deeman. the way I shot last night I should not have Stick as my name. I was lousy. /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

Brian in VA
11-03-2007, 05:06 PM
Kelly,
It sounds to me like you're approaching all this correctly. The fact that you said you don't know what you don't know is proof of that. I've had 3 lessons from Scott and learned something in each one making it well worth my while. I was a trainer for a number of years and understand what it takes to be a good student, so I'm a good student. Couple of things to keep in mind:

Be rested and prepared to learn. Eat just enough to keep from being hungry but don't be stuffed. Don't drink too much caffeine before the lesson or you'll be jumpy.

Attempt to do everything Scott tells you exactly the way he describes it. This will open your mind and body to the new stroke/experience/feeling. If you don't do it perfectly the first time, keep trying and don't focus on the result but on the movement being taught. You don't control the object ball or cue ball. You control the cue stick and it's how you control that which affects the outcome of the shot. Scott will show you the best behaviors to maximize this control. He will also show you ways to practice these and have some ideas about how to maximize the practice. If you employ them, and practice them until you don't have to think about them, you will get better. I did!

Have fun!

Brian in VA /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

wolfdancer
11-03-2007, 05:54 PM
Hey, Scott's getting all this free publicity...so I think it ok to give Fran a little credit as well. She's not only a BCA certified Master Instructor, but plays a mean stick as well.
The "them that can't, teaches" rule does not apply re her.
Anybody in the NYC area looking to take lessons, doesn't have to look beyond Fran.

av84fun
11-03-2007, 10:39 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> Your concern should not be about Scott's teaching ability but about your learning capabilities.

<font color="red">WHAT MAKES A GOOD STUDENT?</font color>

Listen and we learn.
Open Mind.
Take notes &amp; ask questions.
Understanding that just because it feels comfortable, doesn't make it right.
Work the Mother Drills slow and with purpose.
Be ready for personal repair time.
Patience &amp; Persistence.
Let the medicine have time to work.

SPF=randyg
<hr /></blockquote>

I whole-heartedly concur with Randy's comments. The best teacher in the world cannot help a "student" who is unwilling to learn.

I just completed a full day private session with Scott and I can say without hesitation, the following:

1. He IMMEDIATELY noticed the exact same stroke flaws that two world champion players and teachers had informed me of.

(Trust me, there is a BIG difference between knowing what you are doing wrong and correcting those flaws after YEARS of having them ingrained into your "default stroke."

It is a tough fact of life that those who are not starting from scratch have to UNLEARN before they can correct their mistakes and there is only one way to unlearn. That is by constant, boring, rote practice of the correct stroke fundamentals until such time as they become subconscious.

The time it takes to correct existing flaws varies by the individual and by how ingrained the flaws have become.

Overall, the instruction Scott provided me was WAY well worth it with the single exception that to unlearn a flaw, you will INVARIABLY go backward before you go forward. Note what happened shortly after Tiger changed his swing (including missing cuts)...and what is the case now.

It is true that Scott presents his entire family of "Mother Drills" as the foundation of what he teaches and some of those drills will not add much to A GIVEN PLAYER'S set of skills but others will add A LOT.

No instructor, in one single day, can cover ALL of what a given student needs to know. For example, in my session, we didn't spend much time on shot selection...pattern identification etc.

But EACH of those issues can take up WEEKS of instruction.

In a one day session, any teacher worth his or her salt will identify certain VERY fundamental flaws in the student's skills.

Now, the problem becomes that you have to remedy THOSE flaws before you can deal with many others. Why? Because what good does it do to deal intensively with...say...aiming technique, when the student's stroke is inconsistent and he/she is not making cue tip contact with the CB at the intended spot. You can teach an aiming technique until you are blue in the fact but if the student is squirting and/or throwing the object ball, what good is a correct aiming technique going to do.

Bottom line, I doubt that there is a player of virtually any skill level (including pros) who Scott could not help.

Regards,
Jim

Stretch
11-04-2007, 06:26 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr>
This could be a touchy post so let's be respectful please. But honest. <hr /></blockquote>

I can't believe people getting on KellyStick's case for starting this thread. All she's doing is asking for advise and honest opinions. I'd probably want to do the same if wanting pool instruction, and I'd expect and encourage folks here to do the same if I were providing pool instruction. <hr /></blockquote>

Well she certainly came to the right place since this is where all the teachers and authors come to be seen. St.

KellyStick
11-04-2007, 07:46 AM
just to make it easy on everyone who is interested.

http://www.poolknowledge.com/

wolfdancer
11-04-2007, 03:23 PM
That's a good evaluation of a recent lesson. Chuck Hogan had the best advice I thought for sweeping out the trash and replacing it with a better stroke/swing....
Dr. Fran Pirrozolo also has some great free tips about Golf, that can be easily transposed to work for pool.
web page (http://www.golflink.com/instructor/pirozzolo/fpirozzolo.asp)
No question that Scott is worth the shekels for anyone wanting a start, a new path, to improve their game....but we have a whole group here of qualified instructors that would also be worth the modest investment to help with a game that you can play for a lifetime. We have a 70 yr old here, that regularly wins tournaments,that also have "A" rated and BCA Master Players in it.In The Masters 9-ball Western BCA event, of a week ago....I believe the player that finished second was around 73.
'course not everyone ages gracefully...we have a 60's player can't run 3 balls if you spot him the first one....but I'm working on improving.

KellyStick
11-04-2007, 05:08 PM
Wolf, I like the idea of a game you can play forever. Let's call it a sport shall we? We used to have a guy around town that played mostly at a place called Lamberts. Used to be a happenin sort place for money players so I read on the net. Kind of a dump now if you ask me. Still has nice Diamond table up front. Used to be level as can be. Don't know now. This old guy was called Mr B. He could not hold a steady hand nor speak to steady either but he still enjoyed playing. I'd play him a game or more when he was in the place. He always thanked me like I was doin him a favor. Heck I'll shoot pool with anyone. It was obvious he new some stuff about banks. I always wondered what his background was but he kinda went away before I had a chance to ask. Hope I age better but you can still have fun regardless I guess. Just at a different level.

Scott Lee
11-04-2007, 08:12 PM
Holy cow! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif What is this, a Scott Lee fanfest??? Geez, I can hardly get my head out the door now! After this...I just don't know! /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Seriously...thanks to all that responded. Part of being a good instructor, as Fran, Randy, Pooltchr and others readily know, is having the ability to put aside your ego (at least for the lesson time spent together)...both for the teacher and the student. All the instructors who post here have good communication skills, the sharp eye, and the patience to stress necessary elements that get to the point of needing instruction in the first place. Smart students KNOW what they don't know. That's why they come to us. There is nothing wrong with KellyStick coming here to ask questions about me, or anyone else! As others have noted, if we didn't do our job properly, we'd soon be out of business! The real truth is that there are far too many needy students and far too few good instructors. I seem to get a good share of students, partly because I get around a LOT! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Like Fran, Randy and Pooltchr, I LOVE what I do...and that makes a huge difference in the success of how I teach! I'm looking forward to working with Kelly &amp; his teammates in a couple of weeks, as well as SKennedy and his friends in a month. In between I'll work with a couple dozen more people on this next trip. At the tail end, I'm proud to note that I have a student coming in all the way from Korea to spend a day with me too! In the end, each of us has a lot to offer, and as the saying goes...when the student is ready, the teacher will appear! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Scott Lee

dr_dave
11-05-2007, 03:33 PM
FYI, links and basic info for many "pool schools," including Scott's, can be found here (http://billiards.colostate.edu/links.html#Schools). The lead instructor and location are listed for each.

If anybody knows of any high-profile "schools" I have missed, please let me know.

Regards,
Dave

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> just to make it easy on everyone who is interested.

http://www.poolknowledge.com/ <hr /></blockquote>