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View Full Version : Think of getting my eyes lazed



KellyStick
11-10-2007, 08:19 AM
I have worn corrective Eyewear since the 5th grade. I can't see a lick without. The pool balls are just fuzzy blobs if I don't wear something. Well my contacts are old and my glasses are even older. Time to do something. Either I spend the $600 or so to get everything updated with hardware or I take the plunge and get one of them high tech solutions. Haven't looked into those solutions much.

Anyone have any experience with getting any of these corrective eye upgrades and how it affected your pool game both short and long term? Please reference the type of technology you used in your replies. Problems, issues, positives?

okinawa77
11-10-2007, 01:48 PM
I had to start wearing glasses at 19yrs old. I got tired of wearing glasses and went to contact lenses. After a few years, contact lenses were irritating my eyes. So, I went back to glasses. I finally decided to get Laser Eye surgery about 4 years ago. I asked around and went to the same person that did 2 of my friends eyes. I had 30/20 vision. I found out that another friend of mine went to the same guy, the same week I went. He told me they were having an FDA study for a new laser, and those who qualify get a huge discount. We both got on the FDA study, and we both ended up with 15/20 vision.

My opinion is to look for a reputable eye surgery doctor. Don't go looking for the cheap ones. There are some people that will advertise as low as $600 per eye. I wouldn't trust them. Look for surgeons that are using laser incision. When I got it done, they were still using a blade in hand to cut the eye. The laser incision has a higher success rate. If you have a high tolerance to pain killer/numbing agents, then you might have a little difficulties during the surgery. For most people, the surgery is an uncomfortable feeling, but for me...having a high tolerance to pain killers....it was a little more than uncomfortable. The surgery is very quick.

I lived in Austin, Texas at the time...and I went to Dell Vision. The founder and surgeon is Dell's brother....as in Dell computers. So far, me and my 3 friends came out of the surgery with 15/20 vision...that's better than 20/20.

During dawn and dusk, when the light is just right, my vision is amazing. I can see everything so vividly...like watching a movie on a super high def TV.

I am now an SL7 in 8-ball and SL8 in 9-ball. I recently won 2 top shooter sessions consecutively. Not worrying about distractions from glasses and contact lenses has helped me to improve my game.

Sid_Vicious
11-10-2007, 02:15 PM
You may have your answer when you get the consultation to see if you qualify. Many peeps have no opportunity after the exam. sid

wolfdancer
11-10-2007, 05:36 PM
I was leaning towards an exfoliation, myself.
No one gets near my eyes, with any lasers. Who knows what the really long term effects/damage are?...and there was a story about a year ago where two woman had an appointment and the first one canceled. They mistakingly used her numbers to laser the second woman, and she ended up with something like 20/100, or worse vision
But the Dr. assured her that after a series of corrective "surgeries" her sight could be restored.
I'll stick with my Wal-Green Readers at $12 a pair
Our room owner in SF had it done, and needed a second correction, but he's now happy with the results, as are two other player/friends of mine

BigRigTom
11-11-2007, 11:30 AM
My wife had it a couple of years ago and she has mixed results. Before the surgery she could read without glasses but needed glasses for just about everything else. She especially had trouble with night driving or watching TV and working on the computer was getting to be a real problem.
Everyone has a little different reason for wearing glasses and it will be the same when you consider lazer surgery. The results you want will determine the way they do the surgery. They can make your eyes work a lot better but you will still have limits as to just how good they will be depending on the problem you start with and just how you tell the doctor you want the correction done.

My wife forgets how bad her eyes were and she now complains about the dry itchy feeling (she has to use the eye moisturizer drops constantly) and she has to wear reading glasses (and she reads constantly) but she can drive, watch tv, play pool plus she can see the stars and the moon and the mountain tops all in super clear HD, day or night is not a big difference.

As for the surgery itself it took about 5 minutes and I watched while they did it. The operating room was in a glassed off room where everyone can stand and watch thru the glass wall plus they had a monitor so you could actually watch the close up view that the doctor was using himself. Not for the squimish though. She says she fell pretty much no discomfort at all and the complete healing process was only a couple of days. Cost was $4500 for both eyes and her follow up visits were all included. She went back several times the 1st month for check ups then once per month for a year and now she is supposed to go for a follow up in a few months.
Like I said, she forgets just how bad it was before but I remember clearly and I say she did the right thing.

I am considering it but still sitting on the fense since I very seldom wear glasses and I play pool with out them anyway. When in a dark bar room I now wear a pair of sun glasses to help my eyes adjust to the bright table lights and I now have to wear reading glasses to keep score (which means 2 pairs of glasses on league night) so that is a real pain and makes me think more about the lazix...I'll eventually bite the bullet and do it, I'm pretty sure.

Snyder1
11-11-2007, 06:38 PM
I am always in the minority on this one ... I have worn glasses since I was 13 (43 now). I'm so used to them, I dont' think about it. To me, the lasix thing is for convenience & particularly cosmetics. I'm not about to let somebody cut into my perfectly healthy, but nearsighted eyes, even if there is a 1 in 500 chance that something could go wrong ... to me, its absolutely not worth taking that chance.

But then again, I've never gotten a speeding ticket & vote republican, so go figure /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

HT

Cornerman
11-12-2007, 08:11 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> I have worn corrective Eyewear since the 5th grade. I can't see a lick without. The pool balls are just fuzzy blobs if I don't wear something. Well my contacts are old and my glasses are even older. Time to do something. Either I spend the $600 or so to get everything updated with hardware or I take the plunge and get one of them high tech solutions. Haven't looked into those solutions much.

Anyone have any experience with getting any of these corrective eye upgrades and how it affected your pool game both short and long term? Please reference the type of technology you used in your replies. Problems, issues, positives? <hr /></blockquote>There are a lot of these types of posts over the years on all the forums. I suggest to check them all out.

That being said, I'll continue with what I say on this topic every year. I'm now going on... I don't know 6 or so years since having the procedure done. In a nutshell, it is easily the best thing I've ever done to my body, no question about it.

But... do your homework. Every doctor doesn't have the same experience or the same technology. In general, Canada will have the latest technology. I went to www.Lasikmd.ca (http://www.Lasikmd.ca) when the dollar was strong. Today, it ain't so strong. My U.S. eye doctor was the one who sent me up there, and he did all of my pre-op and post-op.

I had glasses since 5th grade (I'm 40 now). I wore contacts since college. Toric lenses at that. I had astigmatism in both eyes, with -4 and -5 diopter (not counting the astigmatism). Total correction as in the -6+ diopter range for my worse eye. End result is that I can see the 20/15 line with both eyes open without any problems.

If there's a bad part, my right eye is slightly worse than my left eye. That's because my left high sees the 20/15 line rather clearly. The right is 20/20. Is that a bad thing? I don't think so. I still have slight residual astigmatism in my right eye, which is what makes my right eye a couple of hairs worse than my left.

Do your homework. There hasn't been a reported case of permanent eye loss at the LASIKMD.CA clinics, and they do more lasik surgeries than anyone in the world, I believe. So, you'll have to fade some hysterical reports of doom and gloom.

Some people will talk about dry eyes and halos. These were complaints 10 years ago, when the technology wasn't in the States to operate on a larger field of vision. They've had the technology. They have the technology still.

Dry eyes... I had dry eyes prior to the surgery, so there was no difference.

Reading Glasses: nothing prevents the hardening that causes reading deficiency. Because you'll be giving up the super near-sighted focused vision, reading glasses will probably be needed sooner than if you don't get the lasik surgery. It's a no brainger trade-off in my view.

There's more, but, that's my experience. I had my wife get the surgery a couple of years ago, and her experience is even better than mine. A new technology was available to totally wipe out her astigmatism. She's sees absolutely perfectly now, and her eyes were nearly as bad as mine.

Fred

Cornerman
11-12-2007, 08:12 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> I have worn corrective Eyewear since the 5th grade. I can't see a lick without. The pool balls are just fuzzy blobs if I don't wear something. <hr /></blockquote>One more thing. If you're going to get the surgery, I would suggest that you're doing it for all the right reasons. IMO, pool isn't one of those reasons. But, that's just me.

Fred

Sig
11-12-2007, 01:21 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> You may have your answer when you get the consultation to see if you qualify. Many peeps have no opportunity after the exam. sid <hr /></blockquote>

Yep, my eyesight without contacts is extremely bad so I don't qualify. I think there's the possibility of getting lenses implanted or something, I didn't consider that option.

Cornerman
11-13-2007, 09:48 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sig:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> You may have your answer when you get the consultation to see if you qualify. Many peeps have no opportunity after the exam. sid <hr /></blockquote>

Yep, my eyesight without contacts is extremely bad so I don't qualify. I think there's the possibility of getting lenses implanted or something, I didn't consider that option. <hr /></blockquote>What constitutes "extremely bad?"



Without contacts, I couldn't see the wall, let alone the eye chart they said was there.


There was a woman when I got my procedure done that measured in at -11 diopters. She was able to see that 20/20 line the next day.

People with thin corneas up until a few years ago weren't candidates. Today, they might be due to the newer technology (zero compression, etc.).

Fred

Sig
11-15-2007, 11:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cornerman:</font><hr> What constitutes "extremely bad?"


Without contacts, I couldn't see the wall, let alone the eye chart they said was there.


There was a woman when I got my procedure done that measured in at -11 diopters. She was able to see that 20/20 line the next day.

People with thin corneas up until a few years ago weren't candidates. Today, they might be due to the newer technology (zero compression, etc.).

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

My worse eye is -9 I think (they're slightly different). It wasn't too long ago that my eye doc told me I wouldn't qualify, so maybe there's some new technology he wasn't considering. Perhaps I will see again one day!