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View Full Version : BCA Trade Show Activity / Attendance Opinions?



07-29-2002, 08:52 PM
Just curious among any of those posting or lurking here that may have attended and returned from this past weekend's BCA trade show in New Orleans - How was the show, particularly the attendance numbers and buying activity at the show - if anyone here knows?

Anything new and exciting introduced or seen at the show? Did anyone attend the Challenge the Stars event on the opening night and/or the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies for Rempe and Jones?

I rarely attend the show anymore, but being involved in the industry as a room proprietor and home pool table dealer I'm naturally very interested in whether the industry is growing or stagnant. The attendance numbers and buying activity at the show is usually a pretty good indicator. Thanks for any responses. - Chris in NC

07-30-2002, 07:04 AM
I'm not sure if attendance was up or down, but it looked kind of slow to me. Nick Varner said he had his best show in a while (especially thursday).
I was there to introduce my own training product to the Aramith co (a set of 2 practice balls that teach you how to aim every shot on the table). I think it went fairly well, they seemed enthusiastic, sincere and said it obviously fits their product line. Or was that just my wishfull thinking.
I didn't attend the Challenge or the Dinner, came in thur, left sat. Did get to see the break rack, roller bridge and get to meet some new people and names with faces.
Got a question for you Chris. Who do you think would be a couple of my best choices for a new aim training product endorsor. Saluc asked my opinion and I said I could probably get any top American male (it's free money and not a scam method) but I told them the Women were on TV more often and the general public doesn't know the difference between top male and female players. Who would you choose and why?
Thanks Joe T

Q-guy
07-30-2002, 09:11 AM
I originally posted a somewhat negative post regarding New Orleans and the show. I have attended every show for what must be 20 years now and this was not one of the best. But so be it. There was a few things I found interesting. I liked the Just a Bridge and the Longoni cases. There was a cool bridge that you put on the end of your cue and it has wheels on it. It lets you reach a shot far away as long as there are no balls in the way. I can see it coming in handy. I think I may get one. Another cool thing was the 44 caliber tip tool. It is made out of a real 44 caliber bullet casing and the tool pulls out. A lot of cues but not too much original. Cuemakers seem to copy each other, as do the case makers. The only real originality you see is Samsara. I find myself looking at their cues saying "How do they do that." Attendance seemed a little low. One seller of bar stools told me it was the slowest he had seen it. I had a few interesting conversations and saw a few people I don't see often. Talked with Strickland for a while. He told me something interesting. He said he won the tournament last week due to the change in his stance. He is adopting more of a snooker stance on many shots. He said he made a few key shots he knows he made due to the new stance. He has picked it up from Fisher.

07-30-2002, 10:07 AM
The fact is, Chris, I've been to at least 15 of these, and the comments re business INVARIABLY fall into three camps: some exhibitors are very happy (especially those catering to the Asian market), some are miserable, and the rest are in between. Every year the show appears in Vegas, the general consensus is, "Well, traffic was great, but we couldn't keep anybody at the booth," and in the alternate years, "Traffic was light, but they sure bought once they came." This year was no different, although traffic did seem light to me.

The banquet was great fun, with two of the more emotional speeches we've ever had - and Loree Jon sang for us! Accompanied by her karaoke machine, she dedicated "Wind Beneath My Wings" to her family and husband, for their support and their willingness to back off and let her take center stage - and while that song is widely regarded as the anthem of sappiness, it seemed perfectly appropriate here. She's not a polished entertainer, but she has a lovely voice and everybody was deeply touched, especially Sam. GF

07-30-2002, 02:48 PM
Joe, you're right about the women having far more TV exposure than the men. Of course, that doesn't do you much good unless (in addition to having your pro advertise / endorse your product in the billiard magazines) you plan to additionally have your pro endorse your product on TV commercials during the televised matches. Prohibitively expensive but likely would have a major and immediate impact on sales.

The obvious choices would be Allison or Karen. For one - they dominate the tournaments and the televised matches. Also, they are considered by far the best women pro shotmakers / potters - so it only makes sense to have one of them endorsing a stroke aiming / training type product.

Of course, for likely a far lesser fee you could take a chance with an up-and-coming future top 10 female player who I'm sure you could sign for considerably less. Names like Sarah Ellerby, Tiffany Nelson or Megan Smith come immediately to mind. A player like this may be more likely to work harder to "sell" your product, however none of them have yet to make it to a televised match - so the name recognition and credibility is simply not there yet.

I can't speak for Karen, but I'm sure Allison wouldn't associate her name behind any product unless she truly believed that it had some merit and benefit. You can send an e-mail to Allison (allisonfisher.com) directly through her website if you'd like to get in touch with her regarding this or to send her a sample of your product to try out. If you can't get a response from her, e-mail myself (piblettwo@boone.net) and I'll ensure that she gets your message. Please mention to her that I referred you and good luck! - Chris in NC

SPetty
07-30-2002, 03:16 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Chris in NC:</font><hr> Of course, for likely a far lesser fee you could take a chance with an up-and-coming future top 10 female player who I'm sure you could sign for considerably less. Names like Sarah Ellerby, Tiffany Nelson or Megan Smith come immediately to mind. A player like this may be more likely to work harder to "sell" your product, however none of them have yet to make it to a televised match - so the name recognition and credibility is simply not there yet.<hr></blockquote>Hi Chris,

Yeah, they may not have the name recognition now, but after using Joe's aiming aid, they'll win everything all the time and you'll know them real soon - all because of Joe's aiming aid! What a sell that would be!

SpiderMan
07-30-2002, 04:48 PM
Q-guy,

I also saw this stuff back in May at the BCA nationals. I have a question and a couple of comments:

Who is selling the Longoni cases, and do they have an internet presence?

I also liked the just-a-bridge, it really appealed to my sense of precision. I do wish it were somehow padded, though, I'm a nut about nicks.

I didn't see much good in the wheeled bridge. It is OK for reaching long on a clear table, but that's a minority of shots. Other than that, it lacks adjustablility and you can't get next to a rail or shoot over clutter because the wheels run into everything.

SpiderMan

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Q-guy:</font><hr> I originally posted a somewhat negative post regarding New Orleans and the show. I have attended every show for what must be 20 years now and this was not one of the best. But so be it. There was a few things I found interesting. I liked the Just a Bridge and the Longoni cases. There was a cool bridge that you put on the end of your cue and it has wheels on it. It lets you reach a shot far away as long as there are no balls in the way. I can see it coming in handy. I think I may get one. <hr></blockquote>

Paul_Mon
07-31-2002, 06:52 AM
What was your impression of the Break-Rak?

07-31-2002, 07:35 AM
I was there..
It looked extremely Slow!
The vendors however said they did good..

The Reason:
You can spend more time with customers which helps customer relations and increases sales..

Just like when you go to a restaraunt and if the waitress is friendly and chats with you a bit, they make more $$$..
When they are busy they are short with customers and the make LESS $$$$.

The Hall of Fame dinner was great...
Loree Jon sang incredibly...

Great videos for both the inductees.

We sat with two Brunswick men and Ewa Mataya..

I seriously think however that there will not be another trade show in New AWWWWlens. imo

Thanks
Brady

Q-guy
07-31-2002, 08:58 AM
Although you try to put a good spin on it. Less customers does not equal greater profits. There were several real problems. One was for people that drove in. I heard more then one complain about spending $90.00 a night for a room and having to pay another $20.00 a day to park in the hotel parking. It is just not a family oriented city in my opinion, and I think that is important. What would posses them to choose New Orleans? (Kick Backs I suppose) I personally know six people who did not go, who go every year. One is a poolroom owner that spends pretty good. You know something interesting, he commented "If they have a web site, I can see what is new and that is good enough." The Internet may be partly taking the place of something like a trade show. One chair manufacture I spoke with told me they were doing so well with their website and dealer network, They don't sell direct but refer to the dealer closet, as it stands now, they will probably pass on the show in the future. There is no doubt the Internet has done more for your US Open tournament then any advertising you could have ever purchased in the past. Even with last years problems, I predict this year your tournament will be your most successful tournament ever. The Internet is changing everything to a degree

Q-guy
07-31-2002, 09:07 AM
The guy demonstrating it was being very tentative when breaking. He seemed to be afraid the ball would go off the table. One thing I noticed was the cue ball always seemed to kick back toward the head rail. The reaction did not look natural. The rack rebounds pretty quickly and it may have an effect on the cue ball. A real rack does not act that way. It is kind of a lot of money and I don't think I would buy one. I don't think it realistic duplicates the break. That being the case I would not want to practice with it.

Doctor_D
07-31-2002, 09:10 AM
Good morning:

New Orleans in July! The only reason I did not attend the show this year.

Dr. D.