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blueridge
11-21-2007, 11:08 AM
I'm curious to hear people's opinions about jump shots vs kick shots.

I've recently developed a half way decent jump shot and I think jump are the the superior option to kick shots in many cases. I am fairly skilled at kick shots, but in situations where both the jump and kick shot are available, the kick shot usually seems like the higher percentage shot, both for hitting and making the object ball. Are jump shots better than kick shots in certain situations are they overrated and is the kick shot the way to go?

I don't fully understand why so many people are opposed to jump shots and short jump cues. What's the difference between using a jump cue for a jump shot and a break shot? Also, what's the difference between a golfer using a sand wedge to get out of a sand trap, and a pool player using a short jump cue to jump over a ball? Golfers don't use a putter or a driver to get out of a sand wedge? Why should pool players be forced to use a full length cue to jump with?

Tom_In_Cincy
11-21-2007, 11:48 AM
I can jump with my playing cue, not a full ball mind you, but enough to be able to use it when I have to.

Kicking and masse shots are much more reliable for me than jump shot with my playing cue.

The Golf analogy doesn't work for me. When was the last time you saw a sand trap on a pool table?

Different cues for different games (Snooker, 3C, pocket billiards) have been around for hundreds of years.

What is so special about jump cues? They are a quick way for cue makers or wannabees to make money. They are very easy to learn how to use and pull out at the quickest hint of a hook.

Learning how to jump with your playing cue takes time and skill, learning how to jump with a jump cue takes about 5 minutes. No skill just 5 minutes from a decent instructor.

More and more organized tours and events have restricted the use of these tiny cues.

I don't know that "many" players are opposed to Jump shots... but I know 'many' that are opposed to the jump cue.

$25 in material, 4 hours labor and Bingo... a $250 jump cue.

By the way, have you ever seen a pool tournament where added money comes from a jump cue maker?

blueridge
11-21-2007, 12:04 PM
I'm not talking about Different cues for different games. I'm talking about different cues for different shots. More specifically breaking, jumping, all other shots. What's the difference between using a break cue for a breaking and a jump cue for jumping. Seems hypocritical to support one and not support the other. Golfers have a different club they use for almost every shot.

Jump cues are specially made for jumping in that they're very light, vert short, and have very hard tips. This makes them more suitable for jumping than a standard shooting cue. The decreased length makes it easier to get the necessary elevation needed to clear the blocking ball. This comes more into play when shooting very short jump shots, where the cue ball is very close to the blocking ball. It's alot harder to shoot a short jump shot with a long cue. The light weight allows for the cue to better get out of the way of the cue tip ball after contact with the cue ball.

I understand that it takes more skill to jump with a long cue than a long cue, but it seems stupid to do something the hard way when there is a cue that is ideally made for jump shots. Again, jumping with a short jump cue is no different than breaking with a break cue.

I paid $80 for my Lucasi jump cue and it was well worth it.

Who gives a damn added money comes from a jump cue maker? It's totally irrelevant to the discussion.

Fran Crimi
11-21-2007, 12:14 PM
What organizations are you talking about that don't accept jump cues?

Fran

blueridge
11-21-2007, 12:20 PM
I'm not talking about specific organizations not accepting jump cues. I'm talking about the personal opinions of some people regarding whether a short jump cue should be allowed in general tournament or league play, or whether a player should only be allowed to jump with a full length cue.

Fran Crimi
11-21-2007, 12:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote blueridge:</font><hr> I'm not talking about specific organizations not accepting jump cues. I'm talking about the personal opinions of some people regarding whether a short jump cue should be allowed in general tournament or league play, or whether a player should only be allowed to jump with a full length cue. <hr /></blockquote>

You claim that so many people are opposed to jump cues. I don't see that at all in my area. (This does not include league play because I have no knowledge of that)I see jump cues as being accepted by nearly everyone. Not everyone uses one, but they don't fight against it. As far as those few who are opposed, I have found that some have never tried a jump cue and don't want to take the trouble to try. Others don't want to pay the money for a jump cue so they will argue against it. There are a very few who actually do have really good jumping skills with their playing cues and feel that others should have to take the time to develop those skills, just as they did.

Fran

1hit1der
11-21-2007, 02:22 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote blueridge:</font><hr>I am fairly skilled at kick shots, but in situations where both the jump and kick shot are available, the kick shot usually seems like the higher percentage shot, both for hitting and making the object ball. Are jump shots better than kick shots in certain situations are they overrated and is the kick shot the way to go?
<hr /></blockquote>

I find that jump shots are generally higher percentage for me, for both hitting and making the ball, since it's more of a direct route and the aim line is basically the same as a regular shot.

For me, if I'm just happy making a hit and needing the cue ball to stay close to the object ball, I'd kick rather than jump. I think there's a certain minimum velocity the cue ball needs in order to jump and this could throw you out of position.

blueridge
11-21-2007, 02:39 PM
I think you hit the nail on the head.

Unless the kick gives you more favorable cue ball control, why kick when you have a direct route to the object ball by jumping?

pooltchr
11-21-2007, 04:40 PM
Fran,
The one organization I know doesn't allow jump cues at all is the APA. You can use a full length cue to jump a ball, but only if the host location allows jump shots. I've been in several rooms with signs posted stating no jump or masse' shots allowed.

Personally, I have a jump cue, and will use it when appropriate, but I also think it's important to know how to find your kicking routes. I feel like I have more control of the cue ball when it stays on the table, but that's just a personal preference.
Steve

av84fun
11-22-2007, 01:09 AM
The golf analogy does work for me. Obviously, there is no sand on a pool table but there is none in a hockey goal but the goalie CAN (but does not HAVE to) use a specialized stick...as do all the players. There is no EXACT curve required for hockey sticks so there is a LOT of variation.

Ditto with place kicker shoes on football.

If you wish to ban jump cues then you should wish to ban break cues too because a break cue is nothing but a specialized cue for a sepcialized purpose.

Then there is the bridge...which is also a special implement other than your playing cue. Why not have a rule that if you can't reach the CB then...though luck...you just have to move your body to where you can reach it and shoot a bank or kick.

But back to the central theme, I think that jump shots are WAY over used and for all but solid A players or those who just practice a TON of jump shots are a VERY low percentage shot (to pocket the OB).

Having said that, in most instances, the jump shot, for those who practice it a fair amount, holds about the same percentage...if not more of HITTING the OB as a kick shot.

Regards,
Jim

mrgoochio
11-22-2007, 01:37 AM
Maybe i'm clueless but I cannot seem to jump the ball at any elevation no matter how close(or far) the blocking ball is without 'scooping' the cueball with my pool cue. i am interested in the predator air to see how that would change my jump.. i know scooping is illegal yet thats the only way i can figure out how to jump the CB. i can never get enough elevation to hit the CB straight at an angle enough to lift it any height...

Snapshot9
11-22-2007, 06:33 AM
First, I can kick with the best of them up to 5-6 rails, and I first determine if I can really make the ball with a jump or a kick, next I consider which option will have the best leave if I fail to make the ball. Many people try a jump shot when they already know inside that they will only hit it at best, but the resulting leave ends up a sellout. For this reason, I choose kicking over jumping sometimes because I know the resulting leave will be much better than a jump shot.

Analyzing jump shots - Go to the side of a jump shot, look at the angle from the bottom of the cue ball to the top of the object ball to be jumped, determine the angle, like 60 degrees. Line up on the shot, elevate your cue from the bed of the table to about 10 degrees above what you determined, which would be 70 degrees in this case.

Most people hit the cue ball a little too low, which propels the cue ball too far forward and not high enough which results in hitting the top of the object ball instead of getting completely over it.

This is going to sound funny, but practice jumping quarters into a shot glass. Notice how you do it, and when it works.
Now, take that technique, and convert it from an underhand technique to an overhand technique for Pool jump shots.

Don't try to 'push' the cue ball to jump, stroke through the shot. Most people find it works best with a light relaxing grip with their grip hand on the butt of the jump cue. And do not use a short bridge, use as long a bridge as you can with your bridge hand.

av84fun
11-24-2007, 12:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mrgoochio:</font><hr> Maybe i'm clueless but I cannot seem to jump the ball at any elevation no matter how close(or far) the blocking ball is without 'scooping' the cueball with my pool cue.

Let me tell you what helped me. (and I assume that you have SOME kind of break cue).

1. Stand your bridge hand fingers up as high as you can to create as long a stroke as possible.

2. Realize that the standard stroke...where your forearm is supposed to start out perpendicular to the floor is NOT how to stroke a jump shot...unless you are quite tall. For the rest of us, we need to perfect almost a "side arm" sort of stroke wherein your forearm is at roughly a 30-45 degree angle to the floor.

3. Aim for the center or slightly below center of the SURFACE OF THE BALL THAT YOU CAN SEE WHEN YOU STAND OVER THE SHOT...which, of course, is a different place on the CB relative to when you sight a normal shot.

4. Don't shoot HARD so much as FAST...it is a QUICK PUNCH...STAB...and not a smooth stroke like a normal shot.

Using those techniques, I can get the CB at least a foot above the table surface and can carry the CB a 4 diamond length.

5. Also practice the "dart method" which, for me, launches the CB much faster (i.e. more height over a given distance) so I use it when the OB is very close. In addition, I use it when the OB is close to the CB and/or is near a rail in which case you will have a tendency to hit the OB when the CB is still flying and risk jumping the CB off the table.

Tom Rossman is the dart method master so google for his advice...and here is another link you might find useful.

http://www.poolclinics.com/pdf/Jumping%20-%20Dart%20Method.pdf

6. Start by jumping over stacks of coins until you get to where you can launch over the side of an OB and then the full OB.

7. Finally, if you have your own table, place a postage stamp size piece of paper under the CB which will prevent friction spots and won't affect the jump at all.

Hope this helps you to get the launch you need. Aiming is a whole different subject.

Regards,
Jim

heater451
11-24-2007, 10:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote blueridge:</font><hr> I'm curious to hear people's opinions about jump shots vs kick shots.

I've recently developed a half way decent jump shot and I think jump are the the superior option to kick shots in many cases. I am fairly skilled at kick shots, but in situations where both the jump and kick shot are available, the kick shot usually seems like the higher percentage shot, both for hitting and making the object ball. Are jump shots better than kick shots in certain situations are they overrated and is the kick shot the way to go?<hr /></blockquote>

There are shots that are just as easily kicked at, rather than jumped, the jump shot is more accurate. This is due to it being more of a straight shot (fuller), when you consider the side-to-side change in angle of approach as being hard to predict/control. This pre-supposes that one is skilled in executing the jump.

As an example, see this shot: http://CueTable.com/P/?@2AUuI1IAhS2JDKn4PNBh4kNBh2kbwf2kTGv2kTGv2kTGv@



[ QUOTE ]
I don't fully understand why so many people are opposed to jump shots and short jump cues. What's the difference between using a jump cue for a jump shot and a break shot? Also, what's the difference between a golfer using a sand wedge to get out of a sand trap, and a pool player using a short jump cue to jump over a ball? Golfers don't use a putter or a driver to get out of a sand wedge? Why should pool players be forced to use a full length cue to jump with?<hr /></blockquote> The golfing analogy--or football, or any other--is just that, and analogy. These are different games, and although I'm not sure a cue-change was considered in the original rules, to me it seems bad form to have a "special cue" for jumping. And, even if you want to go with the golf analogy, how come theres a cue for every occasion, but you still can't have certain types (like, are "Big Bertha" drivers disallowed?).

The argument about using a bridge doesn't hold water, as it's really more of an implement to be used for shots that would otherwise be unreachable.

If anything, I think that a rule could be made, that only one cue-switch could be made per round. That way, if one chooses to use a jump-cue, the one has to finish the shooting round with that cue! This could also apply to the break cue--where the allowed switch is used to go to the playing cue. The loophole here being that if you don't sink anything on the break, then the playing cue is simply used starting the next round (turn at the table). Complicated, I know. . . .

Regarding break cues, a difference that I see for allowing them, is that their use is partially to save wear and tear on the regular playing cue. I could also find some room for an argument to be made, that the benefits of a breaking cue are still dubious, as more luck than skill. Although, it may be that the tip itself is more determining in the break, than the stick--considering phenolics.

Anyway, back to jump shots. I think a purpose-made jump cue is a little more like cheating, in that it substitutes skill in making the shot, with technology. If not, then why are wooden jump cues allowed, but aluminum jump "rods" are not?



=====================

av84fun
11-24-2007, 06:06 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote heater451:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote blueridge:</font><hr> The golfing analogy--or football, or any other--is just that, and analogy.

Right but the purpose of an analogy is to illustrate a point by using an alternative example. Golf is a particularly apt analogy becuase like pool, gold involves using an implement to propel a ball...and with varying objectives...such as to propel a ball to a specific location or to propel it into a hole.

Of all the major sports, golf is clearly the most analgous to pool. (and if fact, pool was originally played outdoors on a grass surface!)

&lt;&lt; These are different games, and although I'm not sure a cue-change was considered in the original rules, to me it seems bad form to have a "special cue" for jumping.&gt;&gt;

But then again, you would have to be opposed to the use of a fairway wood in golf...and for the same reason. And yes, in the early days of golf only 3 or 4 clubs were used. All others had to be permitted by rules changes. And as a further analogy, as you may know, there are different golf ball dimple patterns that seriously affect ball flight. While you can't change balls during play on a given hole, you can change it for each whole if you want.

&lt;&lt;Anyway, back to jump shots. I think a purpose-made jump cue is a little more like cheating, in that it substitutes skill in making the shot, with technology.&gt;&gt;

But then football players couldn't wear different spikes (on natural turf) depending on whether the turf was dry or soggy etc. etc.

The jump cue adds a new (vertical) dimension to the game. ALL games evolve...not only in the sense of equipment but rules as well. There probably hasn't been a single year in the history of the NFL, for example, when some rule hasn't been changed. Just like the addition of TECHNOLOGY in the form of the instant replay that the vast majority of observers are heavily in favor of.

But the BEST argument in favor of the jump cue is that pool audiences LOVE jump shots. They go NUTS when someone pockets a difficult one. And given the less than dynamic state of the pool world, we should be in favaor of almost anything that would energize it.

Regards,
Jim

1hit1der
11-25-2007, 01:50 PM
How's about this analogy:

I just watched the movie "The Flying Scotsman". It's about a Scottish bicyclist, Graeme Obree, who essentially re-invented the bicycle, allowing for a more aerodynamic position while riding....twice. Each time he'd try to be innovative and try something different, the governing cycling body (UCI) found a new reason to ban the bike. For bicycling, it essentially comes down to measurements and positions of the different components and where your hands can be. The UCI takes the position that human effort and skill are more significant than technological advancements.

This is fundamentally the same thing that this discussion is about. Being a scientist/engineer, I tend to embrace technology. As an athlete, I understand, respect, and admire the skill it takes to accomplish various physical and mental feats. However, I'll refrain from taking sides on the jump cue debate.

Tom_In_Cincy
11-26-2007, 12:09 AM
Jim,

Your 'technology' theme is not new.

Since the early 80s changes have been taking place in pool, The biggest is RULES (Texas Express especially) then all the technical improvements like, Table cloth (Simonis 860 and 740), Predator shafts and cues, Red Dot and Black Dot shafts by Meucci, the introduction of the BREAK cue, Sardo Racks and the like, gloves, NEW Layered TIPS, Phenolic tips, the poka dot cue ball and all those new plastic variations of bridge HEADS.

Golf doesn't have the same playing conditions as Pool. You have 50x100 inch playing area with rail heights just about all standard and pockets widths varying between 5 inches or less.


Jump cues go against most signs in the pool room... NO Jump Shots and No Masse shots.

They ruin the cloth... and can cause the OB and the CB to fly off the table... and cause injury.

IMO Pocket billiards was not intended to use the Vertical axis.

And your comment about Break Cues being special.

IMO the claims of improving your break by using 'break cues' is just hype and marketing for a lot of unskilled players to find a magic pill to improve their break. But, if you want to save wear and avoid mushrooming on your regular playing cue, I have no problem with a player taking a house cue and using it to break, or pulling a $300 house cue with a phenolic tip and accomplishing the same purpose.

I think you are just not going to agree with anything I say, with the exception that we agree to disagree.

blueridge
11-26-2007, 11:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> Fran,
The one organization I know doesn't allow jump cues at all is the APA. You can use a full length cue to jump a ball, but only if the host location allows jump shots. <hr /></blockquote>
The APA has lots of really stupid rules. I'm a skill level 6 in the APA, and not being able to use a short cue to jump with is the second most asinine rule the APA has, and has hurt me many times against strong players. Not being able to push out is by far the stupidest rule they have. In match last week, I was playing a very strong skill level 7 player and he played a good safety on me. The only path I had to the object ball was a very short jump shot. There was no kick shot available. I could've easily hit the ball had I been allowed to use my short jump cue, but the rules only allow me to switch to my full length break cue for jumping. I game a strong player ball in hand and he ran out. It doesn't make any sense that players on the professional tour can switch to a jump cue, but mediocre amateur have to jump with a full length cue.

blueridge
11-26-2007, 11:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote av84fun:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote heater451:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote blueridge:</font><hr> The golfing analogy--or football, or any other--is just that, and analogy.

But the BEST argument in favor of the jump cue is that pool audiences LOVE jump shots. They go NUTS when someone pockets a difficult one. And given the less than dynamic state of the pool world, we should be in favaor of almost anything that would energize it.

Regards,
Jim
<hr /></blockquote>

You made a great point about jump shots that I left out. Spectators love seeing jump shots. Given the sad state of professional pool popularity nowadays, the more jump shots the better for increasing the game's popularity.

blueridge
11-26-2007, 11:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> Jim,

IMO the claims of improving your break by using 'break cues' is just hype and marketing for a lot of unskilled players to find a magic pill to improve their break. But, if you want to save wear and avoid mushrooming on your regular playing cue, I have no problem with a player taking a house cue and using it to break, or pulling a $300 house cue with a phenolic tip and accomplishing the same purpose.

I think you are just not going to agree with anything I say, with the exception that we agree to disagree. <hr /></blockquote>

That's nonsense. I bought my Predator BK2 break cue about a year ago, and this stick has significantly improved my break. With this stick, I can get more power into my break and pocket balls a higher percentage of my breaks than with any other break cue I've ever used. I can hit the cue ball almost a full right or left of center with a super hard hit and still not use control of the cue ball. With any other break cue I've used, the cue ball would fly off the table. I pocket balls breaking in 8-ball and 9-ball at least 70% of the time.

Still, without good form, no break cue will improve your break. I've broke with bad form using this cue and broke terribly. Still, compared to every other break cue I've used, this stick has given me by far the best results I've had with my 8-ball and 9-ball break. It's an awesome stick and worth the hefty price.

av84fun
11-26-2007, 11:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1hit1der:</font><hr> How's about this analogy: <hr /></blockquote>

Sure, it's an apt analogy but the BIG difference is that, unlike golf, tennis and bicycling, game of pool does not have such highly centralized and dictatorial governing bodies. So, a LOT is left up to local discretion.

I'm not sure whether that is a good or bad thing.

But back to your analogy, while the governing body banned THAT PARTICULAR technology, it is equally true that a TON of new technology has been adopted by the pro cycling industry.

Regards,
Jim

av84fun
11-26-2007, 12:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> Jim,

They ruin the cloth... and can cause the OB and the CB to fly off the table... and cause injury.

IMO Pocket billiards was not intended to use the Vertical axis.

I think you are just not going to agree with anything I say, with the exception that we agree to disagree. <hr /></blockquote>

Jump shots don't "ruin the cloth" any more than break shots and hard jacked up shots off a rail do. Those shots leave friction spots which is only a cosmetic issue...except for the off the rail break shot which, eventually, will drill a hole in the cloth due to the break being executed from the exact same spot thousand of times during the life of the cloth.

As for what pocket billiards "was intended" to be, it was originally intended to be played with a MALLET with no leather surface. The introduction of the now traditional pool cue and the leather tip were RADICAL innovations and were, in their day, roundly criticized by pureists who didn't like the changes to the game.

And the beat goes on.
Regards,
Jim

blueridge
11-26-2007, 12:14 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote heater451:</font><hr>
Anyway, back to jump shots. I think a purpose-made jump cue is a little more like cheating, in that it substitutes skill in making the shot, with technology. If not, then why are wooden jump cues allowed, but aluminum jump "rods" are not?
<hr /></blockquote>

Is a golfer cheating or giving himself an unfair advantage when he uses a sand wedge to get out of a sand trap? Should he be forced to use a putter or driver instead? That would take a lot more skill than taking the easy way out and using the club that's actually designed for that specific shot. This is the same senseless arguement certain people make against using short jump cues. It does take more skill to jump with a long cue. This is true because long cues are not designed for jumping. To me, it seems like you'd have to be a sado masochist to use a full length cue instead of a long cue for jumping over a ball. It's kind of like banking a ball 3 rails when you have an easy cut shot. Sure it takes a lot more skill, but it's just stupid you can shoot a high percentage shot instead.

Furthermore what's the difference between breaking with a break cue and jumping with a jump cue? I understand saving wear and tear on your shooting cue, but this is not the only reason one should be allowed to use a special cue. That's not the case on golf, where you have a different club for almost every shot.

I have never understood this arguement against the usage of short jump cues.

I've never shot with an aluminum cue, so I can't comment on that.

Tom_In_Cincy
11-26-2007, 01:58 PM
Looks like your magic pill worked for you... and you admit that it you still has problems when you first got it.

My guess is that YOU improved your break and the cue did exactly what YOU wanted it to.

Tom_In_Cincy
11-26-2007, 02:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote av84fun:</font><hr>

Jump shots don't "ruin the cloth" any more than break shots and hard jacked up shots off a rail do. Those shots leave friction spots which is only a cosmetic issue...except for the off the rail break shot which, eventually, will drill a hole in the cloth due to the break being executed from the exact same spot thousand of times during the life of the cloth.

Jim <hr /></blockquote>

Your opinion and I respect that... but I also have an opinion and you seem to think it is wrong.

Friction marks are 'DAMAGE' to the cloth. Even cloth manufactures will and have, backed me up. What you believe is contrary to the industry.

Maybe if you had to recloth 33 tables twice a year you'd take a different look at Jump Cues, Jump shots and masses and POST YOUR OWN Sign

Derek
11-26-2007, 02:56 PM
Rumor has it from some league operators that the APA may allow jump shots with a jump cue in the next release of the rules. It sounds like there is a strong push for this to be allowed. So it will then come down to whether the pool hall/bar allows jump shots and masses and that will supersede.

I don't have an issue with jump shots. I'm hit or miss with them, but I do like shooting them as much as I like kick shots. I probably get a little more satisfaction out of hitting a good kick shot though.

If there is a general turn-off to jump shots with a jump cue, it probably stems from the jump shot being a speciality shot that can now be accomplished by less-skilled players with the use of a short cue. Jumping with a full cue can be impressive, but I hate pounding my tip down.

I think jump shots should be allowed in most cases. If my opponent wants to jump out of a hooked position, then go for it. I have yet to run across anyone that can pocket a ball consistently with a jump shot much less keep control on the cue. A good kick shot artist stands a better chance of cue ball control after contact and would be a more dangerous opponent than those that feel the need to jump.

blueridge
11-27-2007, 12:34 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> Looks like your magic pill worked for you... and you admit that it you still has problems when you first got it.

My guess is that YOU improved your break and the cue did exactly what YOU wanted it to. <hr /></blockquote>

I've been playing pool for a long time and have used lots of different break sticks. I'm not some dumb beginner who doesn't know what he's talking about. I know that an expensive cue means nothing if you don't know how to use it.

The predator cue did improve my break. I've shot with lots of break cues, and have had a consistently good break over the years. Not a great break until recently, but a pretty good one. The first few days after I got the new cue, I would break the balls extremely hard just to get a feel for what this stick would allow me to do, hitting the cue ball almost a full tip off center sometimes because the extra power diminished my accuracy. I've done this with lots of other sticks, and the cue ball would fly off the table most of the time. With the predator cue, I was regularly pocketing 3 balls on my 9 ball break.

Later, I went into a breaking slump as a result of bad form, and the expensive break cue didn't give me any better results than a house cue. I did spend a lot of time practicing my break, and my technique is better now than it's ever been. I'm not saying that the cue magically made me break better. I am saying that no other break cue has allowed me to generate so much power in my break without sacrificing cue ball control. This stick has definitely done that.