PDA

View Full Version : Why pool?



nmshooter
07-31-2002, 04:54 AM
"When I'm goin', when I'm really goin', I feel like a, like a jockey must feel when he's sittin' on his horse, he's got all that speed and that power underneath him, he's coming into the stretch, the pressure's on him - and he knows. He just feels, when to let it go and how much. 'Cause he's got everything workin' for him - timing, touch. It's a great feeling, boy - it's a real great feeling - when you're right and you know you're right. Like all of a sudden, I got oil in my arm. Pool cue's part of me. You know, it's a - pool cue, it's got nerves in it. It's a piece of wood; it's got nerves in it. You can feel the roll of those balls. You don't have to look. You just know. You make shots that nobody's ever made before. And you play that game the way nobody's ever played it before."

Ok, here is the question. What was the defining moment(s) that told you "Pool was the game for you?

nmshooter
07-31-2002, 04:55 AM
I will start off since I created the thread:

I have played pool (for fun) most of my life. I used to go with friends and hit a few balls, never took it serious. In 1992, I was 24 years old. After work each Friday, me and a few friends would go to a nearby bar and have a few beers and shoot some pool. One night while shooting some guys approached me and asked if I would play on their league team. I said yes and since then, I have been hooked.

I played league for a few years in Las Vegas and after a while started running tournaments for "A" players out of a place that sponsored my league team. I considered myself a low "B" player but I enjoyed playing and being around the better players. One night, I got my best friend to run the tourney so I could play. I drew Ritchie Ambrose. I didnt know much about Ritchie other than I had seen him in the tourneys a few times. He was kinda loud and obnoxious and shot a decent game, although I had figured most of his better years had passed him. My friend told me he had been a World Class player at one time (I dont know the truth of that statement). I beat him in our match and he was pretty upset about it and didnt think I should have beaten him. Kept saying I played way over my head, which may be true. My next match I drew Jimmy Moore (Cowboy Jimmy Moore's son I was told, again I dont know the truth). Jimmy plays very good pool when he wants to and depending on whether or not he needs money to fill the poker machines. He was one of the nicer players to me and would give me occasional help when I asked for it. The crowd had kinda gathered around to watch our match as it was center table in the place we were playing. We were playing 9 ball and after a short while Jimmy played a real nice safe on me. The crowd recognized his good shot with applause as I got up to shoot. He turned to the crowd and asked "Has anyone ever lost a game from this position?" The crowd said "no" and Jimmy then responded "You must not play a whole lot then" I proceeded to kick to the side rail and made the shot. The crowd cheered and I won that game. I lost the match however. There have been other great memories since then but I will never ever forget that night and the feelings I felt. That night has made me love this game and I know in my heart that pool will always be a part of my life and dear to my heart. When I drive by a pool hall I cant help but think that I should stop. When I see a pool table on TV it makes me wanna get up and go shoot. I love this game!!!

Doctor_D
07-31-2002, 05:19 AM
Good morning:

On December the 29th, 2000 several of my girlfriends, complaining that they never see me anymore because I was working so many hours, hijacked me and took me to dinner and afterwards to a local Tavern. The Tavern had Three (3) Bar Boxes and we ended up shooting pool all night. Needless to say we had a great time, myself especially, because this was my initial introduction to pool. New Year's Eve, with no plans or date, I returned to the Tavern to ring in the New Year and ended up playing pool with the Tavern owner all night. Afterwards, as the evening was winding down into the early morning, the Tavern owner asked me to join one of the Thursday night league teams. I agreed and found myself being introduced to the local APA leagues. With-in One (1) week, I was on Two (2) more teams competing on Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday nights and, much to my own amazement, I was wining matches. Intrigued with the game and the challenges it presented, coupled with my apparent ability to pocket balls, I decided to take some lessons. With no local resources which I could find, I turned to the WPBA WebSite and sent an E-mail to Allison Fisher asking for a coaching reference in the NYC area. Allison responded immediately with a referral to Gerda Hofstatter and with-in a week I was taking my first lessons with her.

The more I played, the more I wanted to play. The more I competed, the more I wanted to compete. The more lessons I took, the more I wanted to learn. To put it simply, I was hooked - Big Time!

In April of 2001 I competed in my first WPBA Regional Tour event with the North Eastern Women's Tour. In May, at the conclusion of the APA league season, my team finished in Third (3rd) place and I ended up with a 48% win record for my matches.

Why, as you will most certainly ask, did I become so hooked on pool so quickly?

To begin with, after being somewhat of a recluse for almost Five (5) years after being widowed, pool provided a means of meeting new people and for social interaction. Additionally; pool was a challenging game and sport, physically and mentally, and as such it became a challenge to improve my abilities and skill level. Last, and certainly not least, is the fact that it proved to be a great release from the stresses associated with my work.

Today, as I compete on the North Eastern Women's Tour and the Chesapeake Area Tour, I devoted a minimum of Thirty (30) Hours each week to the development of my game and skills. Twenty (20) hours of drills and Ten (10) hours of competitive practice (not including an average of Two (2) tournaments per month) are the norm Plus, Four (4) hours of coaching every Three (3) weeks.

Needless to say I am committed to the game, the sport and the development of my skills and abilities.

Dr. D.

bluewolf
07-31-2002, 05:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: nmshooter:</font><hr>

Ok, here is the question. What was the defining moment(s) that told you "Pool was the game for you? <hr></blockquote>

I like pool I think because it both mentally challenging and physically challenging. It also requires a lot of left brain stuff such as the technique part. I am right brained but with a reasonably developed left brain. My left brain is a little weaker so I enjoy developing that part of me.

When I married my husband and he gave me my first nice cue stick and I went to the pool apa match, that is when I knew it was for me, but i did not try very hard.somehow i am seeing things more clear after a short break and I have come back with a new enthusiasm and determination to be an excellent player of this game. When i read many of you guy's posts, I can see how little I know and how much I need to learn. It excites me to get so many great ideas and I can't wait to get to the pool hall to try them out.

before getting on this forum, i did not realize that the cb threw the ob so i was not compensating for this. i think that this is part of the reason (not the whole reason)that i have been missing cut shots when i knew the aim was true.

a right brained person typically asks 'why' to everything because they learn best by concept. so when you guys give a suggestion i ask my husband 'why' and he explains it to me. then it makes sense in an exciting way.

i love this game and i am addicted.

bluewolf

07-31-2002, 07:42 AM
nmshooter, Jimmy Moore indeed has a son who works in a casino in Vegas. I knew J. Moore Sr. and met his son 1 time so chances are it was his son. canwin

DEADSTOKE32
07-31-2002, 09:46 AM
ONE NIGHT I GOT KICK OUT OF A CLUB IN NEW YORK .WENT OVER 26 STREET POOL ROOM AND PLAYED UNTIL MORNING .AND FROM THAT DAY ON I LOVED THE GAME.IT WAS JUST THE WAY THE BALLS MOVE AROUND THE TABLE AFTER THAY WERE HIT."LIKE MAGIC".DROPING IN THE POCKETS.
AND WHEN I STARTED PLAYIN 4 MONEY AND WHEN I WAS WINNING "GREAT" LOSEING SUCKED.
BUT STILL AND ALL MY BEST FRIEND "SNOOKY NYC" KEEP ME PLAYING AFTER SHE GOT ME FOR 20 BUCKS.I GAVE HER THE 4 ,AND THE 7 FOR 10 A SET.AND LOST BUT I DIDN'T KNOW THEN WHAT I KNOW NOW.
AND NOW SHE HAS THAT GAME 4 "LIFE BABY"..........
AND THAT IS Y I PLAY AND SPEND A ASS OF MONEY 2 GET BETTER..

9 Ball Girl
07-31-2002, 10:06 AM
When I was about 8 years old, my Dad used to play in a softball league. Afterwards, everyone went to a family social club where they had a pool table. The first time I went in, I was excited to see a green table with colorful balls. It looked like fun. My Dad has his own stick but because I was so little, I had to play with the shaft on top of a milk crate. He would position the balls so that they hung at the pocket and he would have me shoot them from the other end of the table. I fell in love with the game everytime I saw those balls drop. So every Sunday after his softball league games, we'd go to the club and I would play. Then came the time when my Dad would try to make me stay down til the cue ball stopped! At that point I thought it was some sort of punishment and began to hate the game. That was the end of that. I don't know what kind of cue my Dad had, but I do remember that it was a walking cane/stick. When he unscrewed the top of of the stick, he would pull out the shaft, screw it in to the bottom of the cane, and lo and behold he had a cue. He still has it somewhere in the house.

At the age of 17, I went to this community center type program in the Village with my sister just to hang out. I walked in and there in front of me was a pool table. Sure it was beat up and all, but it made me feel all warm and fuzzy inside 'cause it brought back flashbacks of when I first saw a table. I picked up a mushroomed warped cue, and started shooting. Next thing you know, I was playing against the kids (some were older) and beating them. I didn't know how to position but I was a hell of a shot maker. I developed the attitude that no one can beat me and I was really aggressive at the table. I wish I had someone to teach me back then but my parents did not let me go to pool halls because pool halls back then were not for ladies. Oh well. A year later, I got a trophy from that little community center for being the Best Female Player for 1992. I didn't keep the trophy, instead they kept it in their showcase window.

At 19 I was going out with a guy and he introduced me to Hall of Fame Billiards (Jean Balukas' place). I whooped his a$$. I did this to him for about 2 years and who couldn't take it anymore. That's when I realized that this is something I'm actually good at. He's responsible for getting me my first cue which was a 21oz Dufferin. Me, being young and dumb, didn't like that he felt that way and so I stopped playing for about 6 years.

To make an already long story short, I picked up on the game at 27 again, met the wonderful people that I now know (Naz, TomBrooklyn, among others) and haven't stopped since.

Q-guy
07-31-2002, 11:30 AM
I can't point to any one moment, but I do remember the first time I played. It became an addiction, equal to anything else you may think of. I would sit in class drawing pictures of pool tables and practicing my bridge with a pencil. I would fantasize scenarios of running out for the cash. The place I started playing had a lot of action. I liked being treated like an adult by the older players even though I was only in my teens. I was also good at it right away, and quit school to play. I got a GED diploma but never graduated with my class. I will tell you a true story that happened in school. In class one day, my playing pool came up and the teacher Mr. Hawn started asking me questions about it. He began telling me how he had paid his way through collage playing pool. How many times have we heard that? He asked if I played 14.1. I told him it was my favorite game. He suggested we play some time. I agreed and we set a date to play at a local bowling alley that Friday night. It was unbelievable, everybody showed up including the principle. We played 125 points. I opened with a run in the 60s and won the game easily. The teachers never treated me the same again after that. I had a respect I had not known before. Mr. Hawn and I remained friends for many years, and played often. He died just a few years ago. I can't think of another teacher I thought of as a friend. Even though I did not graduate with my class I went to my 20 year reunion. What is funny, my playing pool was the only thing anyone remembered about me. That and I used to sleep in class all the time, because I was out all night and a lot of times came straight to school from the poolroom. I guess I am not much of a role model.

Q-guy
07-31-2002, 11:39 AM
Trust me, Ritchie Ambrose could play. Just don't lone him money.

07-31-2002, 04:09 PM
Don't catch amnesia on me Deadstroke... you know I beat you that night for way more than $20... LOL. It's ok I know it's something you'd LIKE to forget (ha-ha)
-- After all these years I'm sure you know that I did it only to teach you about how a "hustle" can come from anywhere... I knew that you liked the game but back then you needed to see what our surrounding players were all about. You know what I mean (wink)
--Hey... I'll catch you at the open! Can't wait to see you!

Snooky

07-31-2002, 04:48 PM
I can't exactly remember a defining moment. I guess that's because pool has always had itself clenched to me. From as far back as I can remember, pool was something I was hearing about or watching... when I was a kid I owned a small hand held electronic pool game I remember playing that thing for hours.
--I remember my mom setting up a meeting to talk to one of my dads' old friends at a restaurant he would frequent when he was alive, they had a game room in the back and since I knew the men to be family friends I didn't shy away from going back there to watch. I was asked to come and give it a try and so I did... after not knowing what I was doing I was surprised to find myself making a few shots...(beginners luck)-- I was about 8 then.
-- I used to play basketball at the community center in my neighborhood and one day I heard that they had set up a pool table upstairs, so I decided to go up and play,... one day became several and after a few years I was beating the local kids and even the older crowds (I still wasn't any good...LOL)
-- A new poolhall had opened up (Mammoth) and I started sneaking in there (I was still under age) and remember going with my brother to another poolhall called (Teck billiards) and then some time later another poolhall opened up (Chelsea Billiards) and by that time my brother was playing some pool with his friends so I would go with them. That's when I would go and catch a glimpse of the top players back then (no names) but they still play and play good. From a distance I would watch all the gambling and hustling and the best pool playing in New York. I was facinated with it all.
---I know I'm a pool junkie... but I know I'm not the only one.
--So you see,... I couldn't get away from pool if I wanted to.... LOL.

Snooky

nmshooter
07-31-2002, 05:38 PM
Nice replies everyone, I think its great hearing stories from others on how pool came to be a big part of their lives. Keep the stories coming. I'm beginning to feel like I know and understand alot of you better.

07-31-2002, 06:21 PM
Please don't think I'm being smart with this question, "Did you finally learn to stay down the cue ball stops rolling?" If so, did you reflect back on Dad's wise, well meant advice???sid

Rod
07-31-2002, 08:27 PM
The first time I played was with my Brother and a friend. It happened by accident really. I was on my way to visit a friend. As I remember my brother and his friend said something about playing pool at the YMCA. The engine on my scooter, a Cushman, locked up. It just so happens it was almost in front of the YMCA building. It needed to cool down, and I saw my brother's bike outside. I went in and played some pool with them. I think we played 8 ball but not sure. It was mostly hit the white ball and make a colored one. I wasn't very impressed with the game at the time.

Two or three years later. In high school a friend mentioned skip afternoon classes and going to the pool room. Well I didn't like the idea, but decided to anyway.

The Room, How was I to know what a pool room should look like? It had 7 tables, sawdust on the floor a few spittons and two pinball machines. There was a long counter with various Items for sale and a few stools. BTW as it turns out those stools was about the only place to sit. I guess you could say it didn't have theater seating. lol Now the guys in there playing was a site to see and hear. There was two guys playing on the first table, one short and mean looking, the other tall and triple mean looking, with a big scar down the side of his face. They must have been rejects from the South side of Chicago and some how managed to escape with their life. Later I find out they were brothers, Moon with the scar and the short one Trigger. Why would a Mother name her son Moon or even worst Trigger? I found out why later.

The room had other characters as well, some even appeared normal. My friend found an empty table and we picked out our cues. After standing there a wihile the old guy on the next table said, tap your cue on the floor to get a rack. Sure enough along come Red and racked the balls. We played 8 ball and fooled around in the begining. It's kind of weird how you get into some what of an altered mind, like indepth with a good movie. When you are playing or when you start paying attention to what's happening around you. You lucky SOB, you need 2, aww crap, lets bet $10. Wait, did I just hear he wants to play for $10? WOW! Then I noticed some of the old guys playing for 50 cents or a buck. The deafening sound of the place, silence with balls clicking, cracks from a hard break, and men uttering gestures. Well all I can say is, I liked it! Even then the thoughts of relieving the old guys of some spare change if I could get good enough. In a short time I went to the head of the class. What I liked most was playing with the best players and I even got a lot of respect. Most of them were a lot older than me but it didn't matter.

After moving to LA I found my game was not good enough, but all it took was playing with better players. I guess you could say skipping class that day got me, hook line and sinker.

nmshooter
07-31-2002, 08:34 PM
someone actually came out and racked the balls for you? Seems similar to the olden days when you had pinsetters in bowling.

dddd
07-31-2002, 08:39 PM
i first played in my parents house in suburban chicago, deerfirld to be exact, played some but not that much
moved back to louisville ky and played some there when i went to college at WKU they had a large pool room on the third floor of the student center, wonderfully large place and cheap too.
moved back to louisville and family and marriage took up my time still does sometimes
but i found a place to play, small place 2 8 foot national tables, that was in the 90's and from that point i started playing much more, and that has continued to this date,
there are a few more pool halls here now and some of the older places have closed
this part of the world plays most of what everyone else plays
but there is alot of play in one pocket, and bank, still
many players here who are very tough bank players.

Rod
07-31-2002, 08:50 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: nmshooter:</font><hr> someone actually came out and racked the balls for you? Seems similar to the olden days when you had pinsetters in bowling. <hr></blockquote>

Why is it I suddenly feel a lot older? lol Yes it was not unusual in many rooms to have a person that racked. I'm sure several others will attest to that fact. It was 10 cents for 9 ball, 15 cents for 8 ball, and 25 cents for snooker. Automatic pinsetters was used in bowling alleys.
I got A laugh when someone said back the old days in another post, and said 1992. That was only 10 years ago.lol

nmshooter
07-31-2002, 09:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Rod:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: nmshooter:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; someone actually came out and racked the balls for you? Seems similar to the olden days when you had pinsetters in bowling. &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;

Why is it I suddenly feel a lot older? lol Yes it was not unusual in many rooms to have a person that racked. I'm sure several others will attest to that fact. It was 10 cents for 9 ball, 15 cents for 8 ball, and 25 cents for snooker. Automatic pinsetters was used in bowling alleys.
I got A laugh when someone said back the old days in another post, and said 1992. That was only 10 years ago.lol <hr></blockquote>

Sorry Rod, didnt mean to make you feel old. I just have never seen that before and I find it interesting. I once paid a kid .25 cents to rack for me each time. He was my nephew though.....lol So much I have missed about the history of this game. I have several books but none of them really get into the history and characters of the game.

08-01-2002, 08:59 AM
That's an admirable practice regimen. I don't think I've ever practiced more than 15 hr. in a week.

You were wise to seek instruction early in your development. How much do you think the lessons have contributed to your success?
Marginally?
Significantly?
Immensely?

Have a great day,

Wally_in_Cincy
08-01-2002, 09:32 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: nmshooter:</font><hr> someone actually came out and racked the balls for you? Seems similar to the olden days when you had pinsetters in bowling. <hr></blockquote>

I remember both of those things /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif.

1969, Five Points Billiards, Hamilton OH:

Little Richard helped his dad run the place-4 tables in a small room. Everything was a dime. Little Richard racked and you handed him a dime. Pepsi was a dime. Peanuts were a dime. Little Richard carried one of those big changer things full of nothing but dimes /ccboard/images/icons/cool.gif.

I only went there early in the day. In the p.m. the rough charachters started coming in. "Hoods", "Greasers" and guys who had been in the "pen". Not good company when you're 11 years old /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif.

08-01-2002, 10:14 AM

bluewolf
08-01-2002, 10:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: whitewolf:</font><hr> I have had to do some thinking on this one, since there are so many things that influenced me to play this game, but I knew I was addicted when my next door neighbor's pool tip fell off and we started shooting with the butt of the cue for quite a while (weeks)LOL. I was 17 then. This is where I started. Then loved playing for free on a bar table after winning (had no money to gamble). Graduated to playing at the New Wood (a bar where people bet on everything including whether or not the astronauts would make it back from the moon), where you wagered a beer everytime you won, and I became plastered every night while on school break. I am also one of those old folks whose pool hall (The Sportman) had the spittoons, celing fans, 10 cents a rack, and plenty of action. And then there were the pool characters, a unique band of individuals never to be found anywhere else in the walks of life. Golf just did not compare, and I gave up golf for pool. <hr></blockquote>

10c a rack. i thought it was 25c, but then you are three years older than me &lt;G&gt;

bluewolf

bluewolf
08-01-2002, 11:01 AM
Why not pool?

bluewolf

LC3
08-01-2002, 11:11 AM
My grandfather had a cheapo pool table, and he gave it to to my father when I was maybe seven years old. I got hooked soon after we got the table, but I don't remember what it was that hooked me. These days, it's about the finesse and precision of the game, and of course becoming a better player.

Q-guy
08-01-2002, 11:20 AM
Years ago they charged by the rack, but these were not coin operated tables. There was a guy that came over and racked the balls. What is funny is these guys were not always that good at it. I remember being on the road playing a guy in South Carolina. The racker was a one armed guy that never got the rack tight. I was afraid to say anything. These guys looked like the group from the diner in Easy Rider and I was a long haired hippy at the time.

Doomsday Machine
08-01-2002, 12:20 PM
In 1967 my father was sent to VietNam for a year of duty when I was 14. We lived in a small town in S. Illinois (10,000 pop.) but they had 3 pool halls. I started to play and hang around as the games were 10 cents (they had rackers at that time also), challenger pays for the table. During the first few months the older players laughed when I challenged the winner as I couldn't play very well. I closely watched the better players and suddenly I started playing much better (was extremely motivated by their laughing at me). By the end of the year I was earning about $30 a week pocket money beating the crap out of the players who were laughing at me a few months earlier. By the time my father returned from Nam nobody in the city wanted to play against me !!

We moved to a large Air Force base and they had a teen center that had ONE good pool table. I was very skinny and a bit of a geek, but I could shoot a mean game of pool !! The winner stayed on the lone table and I would go there on Friday &amp; Saturday night at 7 p.m. and basically stay on the table until 11 p.m. They had a monthly tournament and after I won it about 15 times in a row they stopped having the tournament. This continued for 4 years.

These "formative years" experiences gave me the basis to enjoy playing pool and I have become a very serious student of the game and still enjoy playing although my business takes up a lot of my time and I can't play as often as I would like.

08-02-2002, 12:08 AM
After my divorce I felt turned out. Had to get a minimum paying job, etc. well, to relieve the monotonus depression, I'd go downtown on friday night and saw some life in the competitiveness. I tried to play and got a lot of tips, but when I bought a $40.00 cue off a girl who was going to jail soon anyway my game suddenly came to life, it was like I took over her place with the same stick! All the attention was mine now and what a feeling having all the guys standing around and being baffled by defeat by a woman (some men just can't live that down). But it kept happening over and over (I mean the attention - I could be holding the table for many games in a row and everyone's quarters lined up). That is extctacy! That's how I met the love's of my life - both my soulmate and pool!!! My soulmate has gone on to that great pool table in the sky (by an accident), but that great event of being able to walk into any room with a pool table and still feeling good never fails me.

cheesemouse
08-02-2002, 07:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: nmshooter:</font><hr> "When I'm goin', when I'm really goin', I feel like a, like a jockey must feel when he's sittin' on his horse, he's got all that speed and that power underneath him, he's coming into the stretch, the pressure's on him - and he knows. He just feels, when to let it go and how much. 'Cause he's got everything workin' for him - timing, touch. It's a great feeling, boy - it's a real great feeling - when you're right and you know you're right. Like all of a sudden, I got oil in my arm. Pool cue's part of me. You know, it's a - pool cue, it's got nerves in it. It's a piece of wood; it's got nerves in it. You can feel the roll of those balls. You don't have to look. You just know. You make shots that nobody's ever made before. And you play that game the way nobody's ever played it before."

Ok, here is the question. What was the defining moment(s) that told you "Pool was the game for you? <hr></blockquote>

Why this game? At the time I first entered the pool hall I was on an adventure at the proding of a good buddy. We were 14 years old and we were about to sneak in the back entrance of the local pool hall. My heart was a thumping as we slowly walked down the dark dank dungeon like portal. The only sound I could hear was the pounding of my bratty ticker, but as we advanced down the windowless back entrance the sound of muffled voices and clicking of balls displaced the red alert in my chest. An adult male voice boomed out "ON THE SNAP". "In your dreams" another voice answered then "BOOM" the sound of a hard break. We opened the final door and a spell was casted upon my faint youthful soul and I had yet to hit my first ball. When I hit that final ball I will look back to this day as one of best of my life..............

The cheese takes poetic licence............. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

Kato
08-02-2002, 11:33 AM
When I was 8 or so my family went on an outing to a friends house. They had a 9 foot table in their game room. I drilled a ball down the rail. I was in love. Didn't pick the game up again until I was in my early 20's. My cousin said, watch this Arge, I'm gonna make this ball and the cue ball will go inbetween those 2 balls. Power draw. WOW!!!!!!!! 3 years later I heard about a pool room opening up by my house, I went in, had a few cold ones, made some friends, rekindled my love.

I've lost women because of pool but gained my best friend. I think I'm ahead of the game.

Kato

9 Ball Girl
08-02-2002, 12:48 PM
Are you kidding me?! You would have to pry me off the table with a crow bar! Dad was wise indeed.

DEADSTOKE32
08-02-2002, 02:03 PM
O MAN U JUST GET TEARS ROLLING DOWN MY FACE.AND YES I WILL SEE U AT THE OPEN .AND U HAVE THAT GAME 4,7 BALL. HELL U GET THE BREAKS TOO ..(C ME GRININ)..
ALWAYS ON 2..HOW DO U LIKE ME NOW....

08-02-2002, 02:08 PM
Now you know you can't give me a spot... However, that always on 2 rule is no good.... you know how much I can scratch on the break... that ball just flies off all the time... I'm too strong for this game... LOL ....so that would be 3 fouls automatically.... no dice baby!
---but you got action anytime!

Snooky

Tom_In_Cincy
08-02-2002, 03:02 PM
nmShooter,

I don't remember a "defining moment" I've been playing since 1965. Started by playing with friends in the bowling alley waiting for a lane to become available. Eventually, later that summer, we went to play pool instead of bowling. I went into the Navy and continued to learn the game.... been learning ever since.