PDA

View Full Version : Problems



Drop1
12-05-2007, 08:28 PM
On a long shot,I have started to hit the object ball,on the side I was not aiming at,or hitting the object ball in the center,when its against the far rail,causing a double kiss,or the cue ball to come back towards me. Can you tell me what I should check on. Thanks

pooltchr
12-06-2007, 05:28 AM
Check your alignment, check how your head is oriented over the cue to make sure you are sighting properly down the cue, and make sure there is no sideways movement in your stroke.
If the cue is moving forward in a straight line, and you are sighting properly (and aiming at the right place) things should start working again.
Steve

dr_dave
12-06-2007, 10:17 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> On a long shot,I have started to hit the object ball,on the side I was not aiming at,or hitting the object ball in the center,when its against the far rail,causing a double kiss,or the cue ball to come back towards me. Can you tell me what I should check on. Thanks<hr /></blockquote>As always, Steve posted some good advice. You might find some of the resources here (http://billiards.colostate.edu/resources/index.html) useful to help you diagnose things. In particular see the centerline stroke drill (http://billiards.colostate.edu/resources/MOFUDAT_centerline_stroke_drill.pdf), the fundamentals "best practices" checksheet (http://billiards.colostate.edu/resources/best_practices_check_list.pdf) and the stroke "best practices" summary (http://billiards.colostate.edu/resources/stroke_best_practices.pdf). You might also consider seeing an experienced and qualified instructor in your area.

Good luck,
Dave

Billy_Bob
12-06-2007, 10:21 AM
Are you using english? Try stop using english and see what happens. With english there is squirt and swerve which can make a cue ball be a half inch or inch off by the time it gets to the other side of the table with a long shot.

Or eye sight test.... Looking at your computer monitor, place a finger up half way between your face and the monitor and so the finger is aligned with the edge of the monitor. So finger is pointing up like | and when you look at finger, it is at edge of your monitor.

Now cover your left eye. Does your finger appear to move?

Cover your right eye. Does your finger appear to move?

If you cover your left eye and your finger does not appear to move, you are "right eye dominant". If you cover your right eye and your finger does not appear to move, you are "left eye dominant".

The dominant eye should be over your cue when shooting. So if right eye dominant, the right eye should be over the cue when shooting for example. (There is another case involving both eyes...)

Might place a mirror up on pool table to see what you are doing. Or have someone watch you shooting to see how you are placing your eyes over your cue.

I have a friend who is right handed, but left eye dominant. So he should place his left eye over the cue. This is difficult for him to do and he will tend to not do this and miss long shots. But when he moves his left eye over the cue, then he can line up the shot correctly and them makes a much higher percentage of long shots.

BigRigTom
12-06-2007, 12:41 PM
Billy Bob,
Assuming you are correct in the explanation of the "dominant eye"
What does it mean when I do the "finger lined up on the edge of the monitor" test and my finger does NOT appear to move when I cover either one of my eyes.
I then line my finger up with a vertical line approximately 9 feet away and it appears to jump 4 to 6 inches to the opposite side of the eye being covered.

I have to shoot 9 ball league tonight and I know I will be thinking about this all through my match.

SKennedy
12-06-2007, 12:47 PM
I'm right handed but left eye dominant. I do not shoot with my left eye over the stick and don't seem to have a problem, including long shots.

I just don't think his problem is related to eye dominance.

randyg
12-06-2007, 02:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> Are you using english? Try stop using english and see what happens. With english there is squirt and swerve which can make a cue ball be a half inch or inch off by the time it gets to the other side of the table with a long shot.

Or eye sight test.... Looking at your computer monitor, place a finger up half way between your face and the monitor and so the finger is aligned with the edge of the monitor. So finger is pointing up like | and when you look at finger, it is at edge of your monitor.

Now cover your left eye. Does your finger appear to move?

Cover your right eye. Does your finger appear to move?

If you cover your left eye and your finger does not appear to move, you are "right eye dominant". If you cover your right eye and your finger does not appear to move, you are "left eye dominant".

The dominant eye should be over your cue when shooting. So if right eye dominant, the right eye should be over the cue when shooting for example. (There is another case involving both eyes...)

Might place a mirror up on pool table to see what you are doing. Or have someone watch you shooting to see how you are placing your eyes over your cue.

I have a friend who is right handed, but left eye dominant. So he should place his left eye over the cue. This is difficult for him to do and he will tend to not do this and miss long shots. But when he moves his left eye over the cue, then he can line up the shot correctly and them makes a much higher percentage of long shots.
<hr /></blockquote>

"The dominant eye should be over your cue when shooting. So if right eye dominant, the right eye should be over the cue when shooting for example. (There is another case involving both eyes...)"


This is not at all true. Spreading another pool myth.....SPF=randyg

DeadCrab
12-06-2007, 04:09 PM
I have been studying on this for a while.

Not only am I cross dominant, I also have shifting dominance. I have tried eye closing (causes headaches and miscuing), tape on my glasses (makes head swim), all types of head twisting, chin on the stick, chin high off the stick, ect. None of these have been a satisfactory solution. At my age, I am trying to adapt to a method of positioning that I'll still be able to when I'm 65 or 70, so something that isn't comfortable now, isn't likely to be comfortable then.

I've been reading the scientific research on aiming, and it is a two component process, one component being vision. The other component is proprioception (a.k.a. kinesthesia), which is basically your brain's awareness of where your body is space.

The two systems are related, as large errors in one lead to errors in the other, but both are important in aiming. One thing worth noting, is that errors in proprioception result when the eyes are not completely stationary. So a rock-steady head and stance are important to have when planning and executing.

Can visual-deficients like me compensate with superior proprioception? I hope so. I have some ideas that I'm going to experiment with regarding this.

SKennedy
12-06-2007, 04:13 PM
I think eye dominance is a goose chase. Your problem is likely due to something else. As suggested...get with an instructor or someone knowledgeable who can watch you. I bet it's something to do with your stroke.

pooltchr
12-06-2007, 05:38 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr>

The dominant eye should be over your cue when shooting. So if right eye dominant, the right eye should be over the cue when shooting for example. (There is another case involving both eyes...)

<hr /></blockquote>
I disagree with this statement. If it were true, then it would seem Allison's dominant eye would be directly above her nose, and Earl's would be very close to his right ear.

The head should be positioned in such a way that what the player sees as a straight line down the cue is the actual straight line.

Since most of us use both eyes to judge the position and distance of objects, I think it's probably best to do the same when shooting pool.

We are all different. Your statement can not apply to all players, and probably only to a small minority.
Steve

Billy_Bob
12-07-2007, 08:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BigRigTom:</font><hr>...What does it mean when I do the "finger lined up on the edge of the monitor" test and my finger does NOT appear to move when I cover either one of my eyes.
I then line my finger up with a vertical line approximately 9 feet away and it appears to jump 4 to 6 inches to the opposite side of the eye being covered.

I have to shoot 9 ball league tonight and I know I will be thinking about this all through my match.
<hr /></blockquote>

I think it means my idea of using the computer monitor and finger does not work for everyone! (I came up with this myself - trying it myself.) This is interesting though. Maybe we are on to something new here?

Most tests for dominant eye I have read say to sight a distant object like 9 to 15 ft. Maybe for billiards the test should include something more close (close shot) and something further away (long shot)??? And the distances for the eye test would be the actual distances which would be used in a game of pool???

Also if your current sighting system works, then DON'T change anything. My message was to the original poster who is having trouble and I was just suggesting things which have helped other players I know.

So if it works, don't fix it!

FYI if you are having trouble with shots, then might want to read more about this. There is tons of information on this subject. Search google.com for the words (including quotes)...

"dominant eye" billiards

Billy_Bob
12-07-2007, 11:33 AM
Here is more reading about the dominant eye...

Ken Tewksbury, Master Instructor (See #6)...
http://www.tableskills.com/article-kt2.php

Robert Byrne: "If you are having trouble pocketing balls, it may be that you aren't bending over far enough and aiming the cue like a rifle with your dominant eye."
http://www.byrne.org/pool/tips/08-1998.html

Says Buddy Hall wrote good article on this: Billiards Digest in June 2001...
http://www.ez-shot-ghost-ball.com/dominant_eye.html

By Don 'The Master' Rose, BCA Advanced Instructor...
http://www.azbilliards.com/donrose/lesson4.html

Eric.
12-07-2007, 03:16 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> On a long shot,I have started to hit the object ball,on the side I was not aiming at,or hitting the object ball in the center,when its against the far rail,causing a double kiss,or the cue ball to come back towards me. Can you tell me what I should check on. Thanks <hr /></blockquote>

Hard to say over the Net, Harry.

Like many have suggested, it's probably better to have someone that knows what they are talking about, to actually see what it is that you're doing.

Unfortunately, there is a lot of bad info on the Net. Sometimes, the advice could be coming from someone who should be coached by you, rather than vice versa.

Good luck.


Eric

Drop1
12-07-2007, 07:43 PM
I think I found part of the problem,I tend to move,or roll my wrist,at the end of my stroke. My table,is 9',and though the movement is minimal,as measured by the deviation of my aiming point,about1/16" off,away from center. The other part is not using a closed bridge. Regarding the Mexicans,there are some very good players,that grew up on three cushion,and rotation,but they are not talking. Well to be fair,one fellow,where I play,when tired of playing at home,has taught me a lot on kicking,using English,to bring a ball backwards at a diagonal angle hitting the cushion first in front of the object ball.