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DeadCrab
12-23-2007, 07:43 AM
If the interface between the back-hand and the cue approximates an unrestricted one point pivot joint, it would seem that this would provide quite a bit of compensation for any deviations from "perfect" at the shoulder or elbow.

I bring this up, because in watching the pros play on TV, it became apparent that their forearms are not perpendicular to the ground at the time of cue-cueball impact, but are forward a bit. You can see this in some players as they address the ball during pre-shot strokes, the cue tip is 2-4" behind the cue ball when the forearm is perpendicular.

This is contrary to standard teaching, but as long as the wrist pivots so that the cue travels straight, should not be a problem. I won't comment on the potential compensation for shoulder dropping, as that thread appears to have exhausted the subject.

Artemus
12-23-2007, 08:12 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr>
If the interface between the back-hand and the cue approximates an unrestricted one point pivot joint, it would seem that this would provide quite a bit of compensation for any deviations from "perfect" at the shoulder or elbow.
<hr /></blockquote>

IMO, which doesn't always get agreement, the wrist and fingers can compensate for certain flaws throughout the stroke to make it work perfectly, create some imperfections on their own, or exacerbate others. I think the starting of this thread will lead to another whoopteedoo session of "point/counterpoint" ideas that can go on forever when it comes to "ironclad etched in cement" vs. "multiple methods".

pooltchr
12-23-2007, 08:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Artemus:</font><hr> the wrist and fingers can compensate for certain flaws throughout the stroke to make it work <hr /></blockquote>

Wouldn't it be easier to fix the flaws rather than having to compensate for them?
Steve

Artemus
12-23-2007, 08:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Artemus:</font><hr> the wrist and fingers can compensate for certain flaws throughout the stroke to make it work <hr /></blockquote>

Wouldn't it be easier to fix the flaws rather than having to compensate for them?
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

Probably so, maybe even most definitely so. But some guys are too far gone in the years of experience to do that. They've learned how to make things work and do it very effectively. If they're still struggling and playing like hacks, GO GET LESSONS!

Artemus
12-23-2007, 04:21 PM
Might as well keep this thread going also, unless everybody is out doing last minute xmas shopping. Mine is done!

How many different ways can the wrist/hand move and how many positions can it get into either at the address position while lining up a shot or by manipulation during the stroke?

Qtec
12-23-2007, 10:43 PM
A good instructor never says your arm HAS to be perpendicular. Whats important is that you adress the ball in a RELAXED manner which is specific to each player.



You mention the forearm, just curious, where was the wrist.? Any slo-mo links?

Q

Artemus
12-24-2007, 10:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Artemus:</font><hr>
How many different ways can the wrist/hand move and how many positions can it get into either at the address position while lining up a shot or by manipulation during the stroke? <hr /></blockquote>

Nobody wants to take a shot at this? Why not, it's pool related and related to what WE or OTHERS do during the course of setting up and stroking the cue.

I count and come up with 7. Although additional variations on a theme can increase the number.