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JohnnyP
12-24-2007, 08:15 PM
It seems that a heavier cue gives me more accuracy when shooting long roll shots, such as when my opponent sticks me on the rail, but I don't really like heavy cues.

Has anyone tried holding a glob of clay in their grip hand, to temporarily increase the weight of your favorite cue?

Would it be legal in a tournament?

Is it just a stupid idea?

cushioncrawler
12-25-2007, 06:22 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JohnnyP:</font><hr> It seems that a heavier cue gives me more accuracy when shooting long roll shots, such as when my opponent sticks me on the rail, but I don't really like heavy cues. Has anyone tried holding a glob of clay in their grip hand, to temporarily increase the weight of your favorite cue? Would it be legal in a tournament? Is it just a stupid idea?<hr /></blockquote>I converted the "joint saver" from my new cue into a 6.5oz wt that i can screw into my butt -- this takes the cue from 17oz to 23.5oz. In fakt it feelz so good that i intend to leev it there for my matches next season (12' table here). It helps my accuracy of aim and of pace, but perhaps dulls my screw shots a bit (duzzenmadder).

And i am even thinking of getting (testing) a heavy velcro sort of wrist-band before next season. I think that earlyr threads said that Earl uzes one of theze all the time.

Anyhow, for shots off the rail, u karnt beat a big flat tip. madMac.

DeadCrab
12-25-2007, 07:57 PM
I believe Joe Tucker advises in one of his vids that when shooting off the rail, using your back hand to push (rotate, actually) the cue down into your bridge, makes for more stability.

I think he mentions this early in his 114 ball run video. Might be worth a look.

1Time
12-25-2007, 08:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JohnnyP:</font><hr> It seems that a heavier cue gives me more accuracy when shooting long roll shots, such as when my opponent sticks me on the rail, but I don't really like heavy cues.

Has anyone tried holding a glob of clay in their grip hand, to temporarily increase the weight of your favorite cue?

Would it be legal in a tournament?

Is it just a stupid idea?
<hr /></blockquote>

I don't suggest varying the weight of your cue or what's in your hand as the best solution. The main reason for this is changing the weight will task you with temporarily re-learning a different speed to your stroke and roll of the cue ball.

One of the first things I learn on a table is its speed, and the weight of the cue is a main factor in doing this. Changing the weight of the cue during play is the last thing I'd want to do since it would screw with what I've already learned.

The biggest factors to be concerned with in increasing the accuracy of longer shots are the speed of the shot, the english used, the shape of the tip, and the hardness of the tip. The cue stick's deflection also factors in but that would be the last thing I would consider changing by getting a new shaft or cue stick.

A faster struck cue ball will curve less due to english or the table not being level. A softer or more curved tip will impart more english and curve the cue ball more than a harder or flatter tip. If the cue ball is consistently curving too much on your longer shots, then you should consider flattening your tip more like the roundness of a quarter or using a harder tip. If your longer shots otherwise are not consistent, then you've got a problem with your mechanics.

JohnnyP
12-25-2007, 09:18 PM
I'm talking about just rolling the ball with no spin. Might come up just a few times in a match, and all I'm trying to do is make the ball.

Could be the first shot after the opening break in straight pool, where you are left up on the rail, but a ball popped out and you could go for it if you thought you were stroking straight.

killerstroke
12-26-2007, 06:15 AM
It is all about trust and this may take time to get use to. Don't look at the OB when pulling the trigger. Line yourself up, step into the shot, fine tune your accuracy as usual, take practice strokes, when stroking look at the CB to hit it square, then look at the CB to ensure you are hitting it dead center on the vertical axis. My stroke has a pause, and I find that helps also.

DSAPOLIS
12-26-2007, 06:55 AM
Johnny

Instead of adding weight to the cue, try using an ankle weight on your wrist. I'd suggest one that is 2.5 pounds. Try that and let me know what your results are.

Artemus
12-26-2007, 07:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JohnnyP:</font><hr> I'm talking about just rolling the ball with no spin. Might come up just a few times in a match, and all I'm trying to do is make the ball.

Could be the first shot after the opening break in straight pool, where you are left up on the rail, but a ball popped out and you could go for it if you thought you were stroking straight. <hr /></blockquote>

Johnny, you're allowed 3 cues. Everybody switches from a break cue, jump cue, to regular cue. Why don't you get a heavy cue and switch on those long rollers? Who cares what anybody else thinks.

1Time
12-26-2007, 11:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JohnnyP:</font><hr> I'm talking about just rolling the ball with no spin. Might come up just a few times in a match, and all I'm trying to do is make the ball.

Could be the first shot after the opening break in straight pool, where you are left up on the rail, but a ball popped out and you could go for it if you thought you were stroking straight. <hr /></blockquote>

Shooting these shots better with a heavier cue or with a weight on your shooting hand indicates a deficiency in your stroke. This MAY best be remedied IN PART by always shooting with a slightly heavier cue. If you're using a cue lighter than 18 oz on a 9' table, then I highly suggest you consider using a heavier cue for all shots, perhaps an 18 or 18 1/2 oz. Otherwise, you're probably OK with the your cue's current weight. There's no way to know what will work best without trying various cues of varying weights. You may be surprised at how differently you shoot with a different cue of a similar weight. The tip used and its shape also can make a huge difference.

One deficiency you may have that can be eliminated right off is to shoot to make the shot AND shoot for position of the cue ball, just like you should be doing with all other shots. Including the deflecting path of the cue ball in your mental projection of the shot can help your shot making. I consider doing so fundamental.

The next thing I suggest you do is to shoot the shot with the same aiming system you ordinarily use. So if you ordinarily shoot with the cue tip aligned along a vertical axis through the center of the cue ball, then do that. However, if you ordinarily use some english as part of your aiming system (as I do), then do that. I ordinarily use english to curve and/or push the cue ball off a straight line to the object ball in an effort to position the cue ball where required to pocket the object ball AND deflect the cue ball in the direction I want. English can be used to better pocket object balls AND move the cue ball where you want.

The next thing I suggest you do is determine through practice of shooting the same shot whether you have a tendency to roll the cue ball too far to the right or to the left when cutting a ball to the right, and determine the same when cutting a ball to the left. If you are unable to determine these tendencies, meaning you randomly miss shots on either side of the pocket, then that too will help determine your deficiency and next course of corrective action.

Other things to do when practicing these shots is to practice shooting safeties and break out shots. Always consider the offensive and defensive aspects of shooting these shots. Don't just try to make the shot.

I would need your feedback after trying your choice of what's been suggested in this thread before making additional suggestions. Ask if you have questions or would like clarification.

Paul_Mon
12-26-2007, 05:31 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr>
I believe Joe Tucker advises in one of his vids that when shooting off the rail, using your back hand to push (rotate, actually) the cue down into your bridge, makes for more stability.

I think he mentions this early in his 114 ball run video. Might be worth a look.

<hr /></blockquote>

I don't have the Joe Tucker video to look at. But one of the BD writers (the one from Lynchburg) told me the same thing quite some time ago. Use a little downward pressure on the cue during the stroke. It works for me.

Paul Mon

bradb
12-27-2007, 02:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JohnnyP:</font><hr> I'm talking about just rolling the ball with no spin. Might come up just a few times in a match, and all I'm trying to do is make the ball.

Could be the first shot after the opening break in straight pool, where you are left up on the rail, but a ball popped out and you could go for it if you thought you were stroking straight. <hr /></blockquote>

1time made some good comments on this, but I think this will help you.

You have to "relax your grip and let the cue almost lay in your hand" on this shot. This has the same effect as a heavy cue which puts more weight on your palm thus eliminating any wrist or finger movement. Since you are on the rail with only the top of the ball to hit, straight follow through is most important.

Never use other devises and certainly don't change your cue! You must keep your rhythm going with the cue you feel comfortable with.

This shot comes up a lot in 8Ball where if you can pocket a ball in the side with the QB on the rail you can roll out for mid table shape.

I actually find this shot fairly easy, I hit it with just enough pace to go about two feet past the pocket if it could. Let your follow through point right at the spot on the ball you want to hit... and stay frozen do not move your head or body till the ball drops.

Practice the shot and learn just how much grip and pace you need.
brad

wolfdancer
12-29-2007, 05:51 PM
I'd guess that your real problem since you are on a rail, is that you are not quite on center with your hit...
Why don't you grab a heavy house cue, and compare the results of those shots with your own cue?
But if you want the extra weight, just for those shots....Google...weighted gloves...there are a couple that would work for you just fine, if you cut the fingers off to retain cue "feel"
web page (http://www.drazathletics.com/)