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View Full Version : sugestions on buying a very first cue please



9baller
12-27-2007, 03:15 PM
i have a lil 7 ft table and i,mm getting alot better then i was.i have always only had k-mart type 17 dollor cues,but i,dd like to get something nice when i save up some money.
but truthfully i,mm getting lost while looking at all the different cues i see online and in catalogs.i would definitly say i,mm still in the beginer catagory,maybe a touch higher.
what would you guys sagest i look for in a cue and what type of price range would be good for an average beginer to look at?
i know alot of cue`s are basicly just like jewelery,with pearls and huge price tags and such,but they are way out of my league both skill and price wise at the moment.
althought i can not just run out today and buy one,i,mm thinking i want to save and get a nice one for $300:00 to $500:00 .is that to cheap for a cue i can be proud of and have great perforance with?

also,anyone have sagestions on what i sould be looking for,for a very first "real" cue?

also,is it a good idea buying used cue`s on ebay or billiard forum`s ?

thank you all in advance for any advice /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

jt10ball
12-27-2007, 05:26 PM
I would suggest something like one of these sneaky petes for now. http://www.billiardwarehouse.com/cues/sneaky_pete/sneaky_pete_pg1.htm
I wouldn't spend over $100 till you get a better feel for the game. Make sure it comes with a pro tapered shaft.

1Time
12-27-2007, 05:49 PM
If you're going to buy a cue online without having used it first, then I suggest Seyberts.com (http://www.seyberts.com/index.php?p=home). They have reasonable prices, an excellent selection of cues, AND an excellent variety of customization options for your cue such as tips, weights, shaft diameters, and shaft lengths.

There's no reason to believe the more you spend the greater the chance is you will shoot better with a cue. You quite easily could get a decent new cue for $50 to $150 that you shoot better with than any number of cues costing several hundred dollars each, even if the cue was custom made for you. Why is this so? There's no way to know what cue and tip will work best for you without first trying it out and comparing it to others. So, if you're looking for suggestions on what cue to blindly buy online, then here you go.

The following are a few things I consider key when shopping for a new cue:
- how likely it is that it won't warp on you - a warranty is a good indicator
- the tip used on it - get the one you want at the time you buy the cue
- the cue's weight
- the shaft's diameter, taper, and length
- the cue's balance - forward, neutral, or butt heavy
- the cue's wrap

The type of wrap you pick, the diameter of the shaft, the tip, and weight of the cue are likely to make more of a difference in how well you shoot with your new cue than how much you spend or what model of cue you buy.

My blind suggestion for you is a Talisman medium tip on an 18.25 oz to 18.75 oz Players or Lucasi cue, 13mm shaft, a hard case, and a Willard dime shaper.

1Time
12-27-2007, 06:01 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jt10ball:</font><hr> I would suggest something like one of these sneaky petes for now. http://www.billiardwarehouse.com/cues/sneaky_pete/sneaky_pete_pg1.htm
I wouldn't spend over $100 till you get a better feel for the game. Make sure it comes with a pro tapered shaft. <hr /></blockquote>

This post reminds me of another thing to watch out for when shopping for a cue - the diameter of the grip where the wrap is. It is common for sneaky pete style cues to have a larger diameter where the grip is than other cues. That's all fine and well IF that's what you're looking for.

I don't recommend sneaky pete cues for this reason. The diameter of the grip likely will affect one's grip and could negatively affect one's stroke and game. When I pick up a bar cue, I am forced to shoot with a standard grip, that is, by gripping the cue in the web of my grip hand between my thumb and index finger. Although I still shoot the lights out this way, I much prefer a cue with a regular diameter to its grip like as is common among a vast majority of non-sneaky pete style cues.

jt10ball
12-27-2007, 09:12 PM
Your post makes me feel like I did something wrong. I wasn't pushing that billiards warehouse place, it was just the 1st one that came up when I punched in sneaky petes. They're not even one of my dealers and seyberts is, along with ozone or platinum so I guess I did do at least 1 thing wrong. I was just trying to tell the original poster to keep the 1st or the 1st few purchases as cheap as possible and this is the same advice I give all my students. Now I'll just have to add in the part about the butts being wider.

av84fun
12-27-2007, 09:49 PM
I would recommend you start out with a low deflection shaft and stay with them.

Get either a Predator or a Cuetec. They are in your price range and are used by numerous pros. 18.75 oz. is a good "middle ground" for weight and you can always asjust the weight with a replaceable weight bolt. In fact, you might want to order a weight bolt set and just experiment until you find what you like.

Regards,
Jim

jt10ball
12-27-2007, 09:57 PM
Does cuetec really make a low deflection shaft?
I love low deflection (use a Z2 myself) but I like my students to start off with a cheap cue with some deflection as I feel it adds feel and understanding to their game a little quicker and then later on I recommend they invest in a low deflection cue.

1Time
12-27-2007, 09:59 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jt10ball:</font><hr> Your post makes me feel like I did something wrong. I wasn't pushing that billiards warehouse place, it was just the 1st one that came up when I punched in sneaky petes. They're not even one of my dealers and seyberts is, along with ozone or platinum so I guess I did do at least 1 thing wrong. I was just trying to tell the original poster to keep the 1st or the 1st few purchases as cheap as possible and this is the same advice I give all my students. Now I'll just have to add in the part about the butts being wider. <hr /></blockquote>

No foul intended. So now you know what to tell your students the next time.

Sid_Vicious
12-27-2007, 11:56 PM
Buy a Lucasi, $100-$150. sid

Rich R.
12-28-2007, 08:12 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jt10ball:</font><hr> Your post makes me feel like I did something wrong. I wasn't pushing that billiards warehouse place, it was just the 1st one that came up when I punched in sneaky petes. They're not even one of my dealers and seyberts is, along with ozone or platinum so I guess I did do at least 1 thing wrong. I was just trying to tell the original poster to keep the 1st or the 1st few purchases as cheap as possible and this is the same advice I give all my students. Now I'll just have to add in the part about the butts being wider. <hr /></blockquote>
Joe, you didn't do anything wrong. No all sneaky petes have a larger grip. As with any cue purchase, your students should look for a cue that feels good to them.

The only change you should make, in your post, is to name one of your dealers. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

1Time
12-28-2007, 09:12 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jt10ball:</font><hr> Your post makes me feel like I did something wrong. I wasn't pushing that billiards warehouse place, it was just the 1st one that came up when I punched in sneaky petes. They're not even one of my dealers and seyberts is, along with ozone or platinum so I guess I did do at least 1 thing wrong. I was just trying to tell the original poster to keep the 1st or the 1st few purchases as cheap as possible and this is the same advice I give all my students. Now I'll just have to add in the part about the butts being wider. <hr /></blockquote>
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr>
Joe, you didn't do anything wrong. No all sneaky petes have a larger grip. As with any cue purchase, your students should look for a cue that feels good to them.

The only change you should make, in your post, is to name one of your dealers. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>
I'm sure you're right, Rich R. All sneaky petes don't have a grip as large as a cheap bar cue or are larger than normal grips. My old Dufferin sneaky pete was one such cue. However, my main point stands. The diameter of the grip, large, small or regular, is important to consider when choosing a cue.

But I consider it extremely weak to suggest it satisfactory to advise students or anyone who doesn't own their own cue to simply look for an inexpensive cue that feels good to them.

Heretic
12-28-2007, 01:10 PM
I really do not understand how anyone could buy a stick without ever holding it in their hand.
Personally I like Meucci, because of the floating weights allowing you to balance it for your own feel, but they are more expensive than I think a beginner should go for.

Artemus
12-28-2007, 01:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Heretic:</font><hr> I really do not understand how anyone could buy a stick without ever holding it in their hand. <hr /></blockquote>

If there isn't a billiard supply store locally or a pool room that stocks cues, how are you going to do that?

For a first purchase that's inexpensive, I don't think there are any rotten eggs out there in the way of production cues sold on the internet. Lucasi, Players, Action, Outlaw, McDermott (inexpensive models), Joss (inexpensive), they all play pretty good and you can't go wrong.

Heretic
12-28-2007, 02:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Artemus:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Heretic:</font><hr> I really do not understand how anyone could buy a stick without ever holding it in their hand. <hr /></blockquote>

If there isn't a billiard supply store locally or a pool room that stocks cues, how are you going to do that?

For a first purchase that's inexpensive, I don't think there are any rotten eggs out there in the way of production cues sold on the internet. Lucasi, Players, Action, Outlaw, McDermott (inexpensive models), Joss (inexpensive), they all play pretty good and you can't go wrong. <hr /></blockquote>

It seems to me like you might be better off financially, to take a drive to a neighboring town if need be to try out a stick. I would rather waste some gas, than buy a stick that does not feel right, and feel like I have wasted my money there. I realize that I might be a little more picky about my sticks, then someone looking for their first quality stick. That may be because I have way too many sticks that I have acquired over the past 20 years, that just gather dust because they are not really what I really wanted.

I do agree that McDermott is a safe bet for a beginner to intermediate stick.

1Time
12-28-2007, 03:39 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Heretic:</font><hr> I really do not understand how anyone could buy a stick without ever holding it in their hand.
Personally I like Meucci, because of the floating weights allowing you to balance it for your own feel, but they are more expensive than I think a beginner should go for. <hr /></blockquote>
Many are willing to sacrifice being able to shoot with a stick and compare it to others before buying because they don't have the opportunity or they are ignorant of the value in doing so. The later is common among those buying online or from a local custom cue maker.

A person looking to purchase their first cue may not necessarily be a beginner pool player. And some can easily afford a Meucci with a floating weight system, which I suggest could be a good first purchase. All cues should come standard with this feature and an option to purchase a set of weights.
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Artemus:</font><hr>
Lucasi, Players, Action, Outlaw, McDermott (inexpensive models), Joss (inexpensive), they all play pretty good and you can't go wrong. <hr /></blockquote>
While I'm sure all of these make quality cues, a new cue purchase should not be made simply on the basis of brand. There often are quite noticeable differences between brands, models, weights of cues, shaft deflection, etc.

Artemus
12-28-2007, 03:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr>
While I'm sure all of these make quality cues, a new cue purchase should not be made simply on the basis of brand. There often are quite noticeable differences between brands, models, weights of cues, shaft deflection, etc. <hr /></blockquote>

You're exactly right about those differences. But it's probably not until we've actually purchased and used 10 cues on a long term basis until we learn what really matters and what doesn't along with our most important likes and dislikes. (OK, so I exagerrated some on the number of cues. We all know it's closer to 20) /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Cornerman
12-28-2007, 06:27 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr> but truthfully i,mm getting lost while looking at all the different cues i see online and in catalogs.i would definitly say i,mm still in the beginer catagory,maybe a touch higher.<hr /></blockquote>

This thread isn't helping you either. Personally, if I were you, I wouldn't spend $300 on your first "real cue" since you don't know what you like and don't like. I will blanketedly say to stay away from fiberglass-clad or graphite cues. More people don't like the feel than people who do. Might as well go with the percentages.

If you go with a wrap, go with Irish Linen not Nylon. Again, percentages say that people like Irish Linen whereas percentages say that people despise Nylon. A lot of people like wrapless, while a lot hate it. So, I can't recommend it for you, since the percentages tell me that's it's a coin toss.

If you stick with the longtime mass-producers and keep your initial investment to, say, $250 and less, you really can't go wrong. McDermott, Viking, Meucci, Joss, and Huebler come to mind.

Lastly, if you find yourself a brand new Joss or Huebler for under $200, and you buy it and decide it isn't for you, I'll buy it from you.

Fred

Rich R.
12-28-2007, 06:37 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr>But I consider it extremely weak to suggest it satisfactory to advise students or anyone who doesn't own their own cue to simply look for an inexpensive cue that feels good to them. <hr /></blockquote>
A new student, buying their first cue, has nothing else to go by, other than feel. They don't know what they like or dislike about a cue, as they don't have enough experience. An inexpensive cue, that feels good to them, is their best choice. It will not be their final choice.

Concerning another point, I think it is dead wrong to steer a new student to a low deflection shaft. First, they have to play enough with a normal shaft, to learn what deflection is. Hopefully, they will get the opportunity to play with a number of cues, because they will all deflect differently.
Only after a lot of experience, can a student determine if a low deflection shaft is good for them. Some players love them, but many, including me, hate them. However, experience is necessary before making the choice. Even then, the student will have to try a number of low deflection shafts, to determine which one of them is right for them. Again, experience is necessary to make that choice.

Heretic
12-28-2007, 10:00 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Artemus:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr>
While I'm sure all of these make quality cues, a new cue purchase should not be made simply on the basis of brand. There often are quite noticeable differences between brands, models, weights of cues, shaft deflection, etc. <hr /></blockquote>

You're exactly right about those differences. But it's probably not until we've actually purchased and used 10 cues on a long term basis until we learn what really matters and what doesn't along with our most important likes and dislikes. (OK, so I exagerrated some on the number of cues. We all know it's closer to 20) /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif <hr /></blockquote>

damn, 20 sticks.......I feel like a slow learner. Can I just call myself a low level collector? It does sound better....LOL

thedude
12-29-2007, 12:55 AM
My first purchased cue was a Players cue for like fifty bucks. Within about 2 months I gave it to a buddy, and bought a viking cue. It was just a plain jane viking that I picked for about a hundred bucks. It was a great cue. It played well for me until I got around enough to try out some other cues and see what I really wanted in a cue. I'd stay away from cuetec cues, and any cue with a laminated shaft... the former for obvious reasons, the latter because theres no need to complicate things on your first respectable cue purchase. Don't spend a lot of money on highly decorated cues; the decoration doesn't improve the playability of the cue.

My recommendation is to buy a $100-120 viking or mcdermott cue. When you have a little extra cash put a moori or sniper tip on it. Then just play the heck out of it until it feels like its an extension of your arm. Cues don't make great pool players, but practice and repetition does.

1Time
12-30-2007, 05:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Artemus:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr>
While I'm sure all of these make quality cues, a new cue purchase should not be made simply on the basis of brand. There often are quite noticeable differences between brands, models, weights of cues, shaft deflection, etc. <hr /></blockquote>

You're exactly right about those differences. But it's probably not until we've actually purchased and used 10 cues on a long term basis until we learn what really matters and what doesn't along with our most important likes and dislikes. (OK, so I exagerrated some on the number of cues. We all know it's closer to 20) /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Well the trick is to try several different cues before purchasing so you have one that will work well for you for a while. It's ridiculous to get in a pattern of buying a cue and then very soon after determine you need a better cue. At least consider changing the tip or maybe even the shaft before changing cues.

On the other hand the mistake to make is to find a cue that works well for you and make the assumption that there are no better cues for you and stop comparing it to other cues. The fact is there probably is some other cue / tip / weight / shaft out there that would serve you better.

This advise really only applies to players who have experience with different cues. Beginners with a limited experience of playing with cheap house cues have no clue what their missing.

1Time
12-30-2007, 05:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> Buy a Lucasi, $100-$150. sid <hr /></blockquote>

There's no reason anyone should believe a $100 - $150 Lucasi would be a better choice or play better than any other brand selling at for example seyberts.com for $50 to $75.

Sid_Vicious
12-30-2007, 06:06 PM
I respectfully accept your personal opinion, yet the Lucasi cues are exceptional, and I do believe, a best value for anyone wanting an untried cue for this price. If I were to advise a true beginner, I might recommend a Mali or other general purpose cue. Today, I stand by my expressions about the Lucasi line at these prices. sid

1Time
12-30-2007, 06:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr> but truthfully i,mm getting lost while looking at all the different cues i see online and in catalogs.i would definitly say i,mm still in the beginer catagory,maybe a touch higher.<hr /></blockquote>
Whether your playing level is of a beginner or better is irrelevant. There are average or intermediate players who don't own their own cue and have not compared anything but different house cues. And they don't have the first clue as to what they should be looking for when buying a new cue. What matters is whether you compare several different cues yourself and from that and your pool playing you can determine what works best for you, that is, the specific tip, weight, diameter of the grip, diameter and taper of the shaft, etc. From what I can tell at this point, you don't know what you're doing. And so here are your options from best to worst.

Option 1
Try several different new cues at local billiard stores and used cues at pool halls. Keep playing with whatever cue you're using. Keep trying several different cues and compare all the differences like the ones I've mentioned. Eventually you will develop preferences and be able to determine what works best for you. Then buy a new or used cue locally for cheap that you have shot around with first and determined works well for you. That's usually pretty much a hit and miss scenario. I guarantee you - after you buy your first cue and your playing level improves and IF you keep comparing other cues, your preferences in what you want in a cue will change and you ability to determine what works best for you will improve.

Option 2
Do everything in Option 1 above but buy a cheap new cue online like at seyberts.com.

Option 3
Don't compare several different cues and determine your preferences and buy a new cue online.

If you don't know where to buy your cue online, then I suggest seyberts.com since they have an excellent selection and can put a different tip on for you, as well as customize your cue much more than many other places. If you know you prefer an 18 oz cue, then buy an 18 oz cue. If you don't know for sure, then I suggest buying an 18.5 oz cue. Personally, if I were buying before stroking the cue, I would buy an 18.75 oz cue, but then I play on 9' tables. If you're playing on a 7' table, then you might play better with something slightly lighter. If you don't know what tip you prefer, then I suggest buying a medium Talisman pro and having it put on your cue at the time you buy it. This can be done if you buy from seyberts.com. If you don't know what diameter of shaft to buy, then I suggest a standard 13mm. If you don't know what brand of cue to buy, then I suggest you pick one because they have the particular cue you want. Lucasi is highly recommended around here, but that doesn't mean any Lucasi cue will work better for you than a house cue. You very easily and quite likely could buy a cue online that you don't like better than a cheap house cue. That's why it's so valuable to develop a preference for what you want before buying, and that's why it's so valuable to actually shoot with the cue before buying. I've never played with a Lucasi cue, but I have played with Players cues and consider them an excellent cue for the money. But then that doesn't mean if you buy a Players cue that you will play well with it. I used to own a McDermott that I couldn't shoot well with no matter what and switched back to shooting with house cues until I found something better. But that doesn't mean all McDermott cues are good or bad. What matters is what works for you and you won't know until you shoot with the cue.
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cornerman:</font><hr>
This thread isn't helping you either. Personally, if I were you, I wouldn't spend $300 on your first "real cue" since you don't know what you like and don't like. I will blanketedly say to stay away from fiberglass-clad or graphite cues. More people don't like the feel than people who do. Might as well go with the percentages. <hr /></blockquote>
I agree with Cornerman here. Fiberglass and graphite cues are not the "odds-on" way to go.
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cornerman:</font><hr>If you go with a wrap, go with Irish Linen not Nylon. Again, percentages say that people like Irish Linen whereas percentages say that people despise Nylon. A lot of people like wrapless, while a lot hate it. So, I can't recommend it for you, since the percentages tell me that's it's a coin toss.<hr /></blockquote>
The last thing you want to do is get a wrap or wrapless that you don't like. I have always gone with wrapless and loved it that way. But after my last cue was stolen, I bought a Viking cue with an Irish linen wrap only to later find that it's too slippery in my grip hand. So if you don't know whether you like an Irish linen wrap and you don't mind a wrapless, I suggest you buy a cheap cue with an imitation wrap, which is wrapless. Some of the cheaper Players cues at seyberts.com have this I think.
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cornerman:</font><hr>If you stick with the longtime mass-producers and keep your initial investment to, say, $250 and less, you really can't go wrong. McDermott, Viking, Meucci, Joss, and Huebler come to mind.

Lastly, if you find yourself a brand new Joss or Huebler for under $200, and you buy it and decide it isn't for you, I'll buy it from you.

Fred <hr /></blockquote>
These are well established cue makers. I've owned a McDermott, Viking, and Meucci, and I've shot around with a Huebler which I disliked the most. But if you don't know what your preferences are, it makes very little sense to spend anywhere near $200 on any cue. And buying a cue based on brand or price makes absolutely no sense at all if you don't know what your preferences are and it's your first cue.

Sid_Vicious
12-30-2007, 07:29 PM
"althought i can not just run out today and buy one,i,mm thinking i want to save and get a nice one for $300:00 to $500:00 .is that to cheap for a cue i can be proud of"

Ok, I am a stick nut, along with being a motorcycle nut, and both items I suggest buying what you'll mentally feel good with, price 2nd or third in the decision. As far as cues go, if you want to aim at A $300-500 stick, buy one, but buy it wisely. There are many custom builders with cues out there in that range, sneaky petes or simple designs, all play to the custom builder's rep, AND they are cues you'll possibly keep, AND if you are like me, your game will feel better than with some low end cue. Say you want to buy a crotch rocket?, get at least a 1000cc and don't buy twice after a 600. If you want a nice cue you'll be proud of, spend a $100+ on it. You simply should feel GOOD with whatever you buy. I am not saying a 60-100 dollar cue aint the deal, but if your mind is already feeling like a nice cue, put the dollars into it. It is your hobby, enjoy it.

As far as on-line dealers goes, I've never had a problem in all of the deals I made on the net. Retailers really get you on the overhead costs, so all I'd do with them is feel many cues and then shop the net. I frankly feel that the Lucasi line, say $120 price, would be a wise purchase. If you had the 2-3 hundred already, then I'd begin to look at a custom cue, maybe a Gilbert for instance.

Buy what you want, that's my advice, yet come here for the advice on those decisions when they come about. Oh hell it's just money, really no big deal. I'm not trying to be cute,,,this sport is worth a few(hundred) bucks on something you'll maybe keep forever...sid

1Time
12-30-2007, 10:57 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I respectfully accept your personal opinion, yet the Lucasi cues are exceptional, and I do believe, a best value for anyone wanting an untried cue for this price. If I were to advise a true beginner, I might recommend a Mali or other general purpose cue. Today, I stand by my expressions about the Lucasi line at these prices. sid <hr /></blockquote>
No. There's no way a $100 - $150 Lucasi cue can be a "best value for anyone wanting an untried cue". The main thing that defines best value in the purchase of any cue is how well it plays for a given individual. And this cannot be determined by brand, price, or without shooting the cue. And so the only possible "best value for anyone wanting an untried cue" is to buy a cue for the purpose of showing it off or reselling it, in other words without regard for how it plays for the buyer, and that has nothing to do with the OP or this thread.

And so like I said before, there's no reason anyone should believe a $100 - $150 Lucasi would be a better choice or play better than any other brand selling at for example seyberts.com for $50 to $75. You have to shoot with cues and compare them to determine a best value. And what one may determine to be a best value may not be a best value for another.

And it's just as pointless to recommend any particular brand like Mali. There probably are dozens of brands that make quality cues. The price point for a beginner who doesn't know what their looking for should be cheap. Given that a beginner eventually will gain experience and compare more cues and develop preferences, it makes little sense to spend a lot of money on a first cue. Just pick out a new or used quality cue for cheap and try to get as many preferences as close to right as you can, like the cue's weight, the tip, the shaft diameter, etc. And if you don't have a clue, then just go with the specifications that have been suggested in this thread.

Now as far as Lucasi cues being exceptional, I wouldn't know from personal experience but I'm sure they are quality cues. But you didn't say what makes them exceptional. Do they play better than cues of other brands that cost more? And would that be for everyone or for just you? My point is the main thing that makes a cue exceptional is if it plays better for a particular individual than many other cues. And such a cue may very well not be a $100 - $150 Lucasi. It just as likely could be a $50 - $75 cue or a $200 - $250 cue. But for a beginner taking a chance on an untried cue, the best value most likely will be a new or used cheap quality cue.

1Time
12-31-2007, 02:00 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9baller:</font><hr>althought i can not just run out today and buy one,i,mm thinking i want to save and get a nice one for $300:00 to $500:00 .is that to cheap for a cue i can be proud of and have great perforance with? <hr /></blockquote>
Since you have yet to learn your preferences in choosing a pool cue that would positively affect your game and you're somewhat of a beginner in your skill level, you're likely to want a different cue before ever enjoying great performance with your new $300 to $500 cue. More to the point it would not be all that unlikely for you to subsequently be able to buy a $50 cue you shoot better with than your $500 cue. However, it is entirely possible for you to be proud of your $300 to $500 cue because of how much it costs, it's brand, or what it looks like and regardless of how well you play. Some people are like that. But don't make the mistake of equating the buying of a cue with the buying of a car. An expensive car will perform better than an cheap one and even a beginner can make that happen. However, getting great performance out of a cue takes a whole lot more skill than stepping on the gas and turning a steering wheel. Highly skilled pool players can run circles around lesser players with a cheap bar cue, while beginners will rarely ever come close to that level of play in their entire lives and regardless of the cue they use.
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr>
Ok, I am a stick nut, along with being a motorcycle nut, and both items I suggest buying what you'll mentally feel good with, price 2nd or third in the decision. As far as cues go, if you want to aim at A $300-500 stick, buy one, but buy it wisely. There are many custom builders with cues out there in that range, sneaky petes or simple designs, all play to the custom builder's rep, AND they are cues you'll possibly keep, AND if you are like me, your game will feel better than with some low end cue.<hr /></blockquote>
To the contrary it's not at all likely a beginner could buy a $300 - $500 cue online without shooting with it first, and then eventually not want a different cue that plays better for him after his game and preferences have developed.
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> Say you want to buy a crotch rocket?, get at least a 1000cc and don't buy twice after a 600. If you want a nice cue you'll be proud of, spend a $100+ on it. You simply should feel GOOD with whatever you buy. I am not saying a 60-100 dollar cue aint the deal, but if your mind is already feeling like a nice cue, put the dollars into it. It is your hobby, enjoy it. <hr /></blockquote>
Definitely, spend up to $500 or more on a cue if that's what it takes for you to enjoy your hobby. Or, spend $50 on a quality cue, improve your game, learn your preferences for a cue, sell it for a $20 loss, and buy a cue of your dreams once you've determined what they are.

BigRigTom
12-31-2007, 10:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote thedude:</font><hr> My first purchased cue was a Players cue for like fifty bucks. Within about 2 months I gave it to a buddy, and bought a viking cue. It was just a plain jane viking that I picked for about a hundred bucks. It was a great cue. It played well for me until I got around enough to try out some other cues and see what I really wanted in a cue. I'd stay away from cuetec cues, and any cue with a laminated shaft... the former for obvious reasons, the latter because theres no need to complicate things on your first respectable cue purchase. Don't spend a lot of money on highly decorated cues; the decoration doesn't improve the playability of the cue.

My recommendation is to buy a $100-120 viking or mcdermott cue. When you have a little extra cash put a moori or sniper tip on it. Then just play the heck out of it until it feels like its an extension of your arm. Cues don't make great pool players, but practice and repetition does. <hr /></blockquote>

I agree with thedude 100%
My 1st cue was a $60 Valley sneaky pete, then I bought a Meucci Sneaky Pete which cost me 4 times as much as the Valley and I struggled with it for about 3 years until my wife bought me a Viking for my birthday. I have been playing with the Viking VX10 now for about 4 years and I still love it.

The thing is, for me at least, the Meucci and the Player cues have a slim and flexible shaft and they claim low deflection. That is well and good if you can actually take advantage of that feature. I could never get comfortable with the twang of that flexible red dot shaft on the Meucci. I like the more firm hit of the Viking with the 13mm shaft and the LePro Medium Hard Tip.

None of that means much to you now but in a few years if you grow to truly love this game it will all make sense and you will develop a preference. That is when you can intelligently buy "The Cue of Your Dreams" and the price and the brand name will be secondary points of consideration.

Good luck and shoot straight always! /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

mantis
01-01-2008, 10:00 AM
Please do yourself a favor and make sure you can hit the cue before you buy it. There really can be a difference in the way a cue feels. I made the mistake of buying a cue without trying it first. The cue is a very nicely made, and hits solidly, however it is a wood to wood joint. I was used to playing with a stainless steel joint, and the feel was so different between the two that I have not been able to get used to the second cue, and still play with the first. TRY THE CUE FIRST.

Also, unless you have the extra money, I would not spend a lot on a 1st cue. Get to know you game with a decent cue, then go ahead and spend more IF you feel the need to. I would suggest starting with a basic "Players" brand cue or a base level McDermott. McDermott guarnatees and service are very good. The Lucasis mentioned above may also be worth it. In the price range you mentioned, you may want to consider Schon.

In my opinion, the roel a cue plays in your game is overrated. Realistically, I would suggest that any decent cue with a decent tip will do a similar thing to the cue ball, it will just be the way it feels when it hits the cue ball.

My overall suggestion would be to get a base level decent cue and spend the extra money on a good instructor. That will help improve your game much more than any cue!!

1Time
01-01-2008, 11:04 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> As with any cue purchase, your students should look for a cue that feels good to them.<hr /></blockquote>
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr>I consider it extremely weak to suggest it satisfactory to advise students or anyone who doesn't own their own cue to simply look for an inexpensive cue that feels good to them. <hr /></blockquote>
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> A new student, buying their first cue, has nothing else to go by, other than feel. They don't know what they like or dislike about a cue, as they don't have enough experience. An inexpensive cue, that feels good to them, is their best choice.<hr /></blockquote>
While I agree those just starting out, students or not, have yet to develop any meaningful preferences (likes and dislikes) in cues, I disagree with your assertion that "feel" is all they have to go by. First, "feel" is one's sense for how well a cue shoots for them as compared to other cues, and such beginners have yet to develop this. And second, this thread has produced plenty of sound advise such beginners could use to help make a better purchase of a first cue.
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr>
Concerning another point, I think it is dead wrong to steer a new student to a low deflection shaft. First, they have to play enough with a normal shaft, to learn what deflection is. Hopefully, they will get the opportunity to play with a number of cues, because they will all deflect differently.
Only after a lot of experience, can a student determine if a low deflection shaft is good for them. Some players love them, but many, including me, hate them. However, experience is necessary before making the choice. Even then, the student will have to try a number of low deflection shafts, to determine which one of them is right for them. Again, experience is necessary to make that choice. <hr /></blockquote>
I agree. It makes no more sense for such a beginner to spend the extra money on a low deflection shaft than it does to buy an expensive first cue.

9baller
01-05-2008, 04:16 PM
first off,i,dd like to thank you all very much for your great advice and i,mm sorry i have not replyed sooner,but i thought i had this thread set to e-mail me if any reply`s,so i did not think i had any replys yet /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif


the main thing i got from you guys is that i sould try a cue first,which i did not know i could do.so i will go that route.although i dont drive,i,ll get a ride to the closest place to me which is http://www.gebhardt.com which looks like a decent place.

i also like the idea i got from you guys as to not buy a cue thats exspensive just cause it cost more,which i have a habbit of doing with stuff like my power tools.although it is much better qulity then the slightly cheaper one,it may be an overkill for my current needs.i guess it would be better to take the extra money and see about maybe getting in a league ,or possibly an instructor /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

from what you guys have said,i think i,ll stay away from the fiberglass cues,although i do like the looks of this one (#99424) http://www.cuetec.com/fisher.asp# but i think that has something to do with my thing for the great MS.allison fisher /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

again,thank you all very much.your advice was very helpful /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

PS:i know this is WAY out of my league,but aint this a sweet looking cue? (G86) (or G85 G87) www.vikingcue.com (http://www.vikingcue.com)
hey,a guy can dream,cant he /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Heretic
01-05-2008, 07:24 PM
the vikings are a little too flashy for me, but I do prefer wrapless cues