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Douggie
01-15-2008, 11:09 AM
Hello,
Looking at buying a nice table.
I am wondering how important cushion rubber is to the playability of the table. I was told that 99% of the liveliness of the cushions is due to the tightness of the rails, and the slate thickness. I just want to get some independent information from some folks who know much more than myself.
thank you!

1Time
01-15-2008, 11:27 AM
I don't know whether the tightness of the rails or thickness of the slate has much of anything to do with the playability of the cushions. That sounds fairly iffy to me.

I would focus more on how well the balls seem to rebound off the cushions when moving at a good speed. I'd simply want to shoot some bank shots and see the balls going in as they should. I'd shoot bank shots of balls positioned close to the side pocket as well as closer to between the side and corner pocket to see if I could detect any variability. Another thing I would do is shoot shots with a cue ball of the object ball down the long rail and over the side pocket to make sure the side pocket doesn't catch it. Personally, I'd do this with low inside English in an attempt to get the object ball to hug the rail.

Douggie
01-15-2008, 11:57 AM
I am looking at a Peter Vitalie table. It would have 1.5' slate, and 5 bolt rails. It sounds well constructed. Unfortunately, there is not a table in the showroom to test. What questions should one ask about the cushions to ensure they are of very high quality? k-66? 100% gum rubber? perhaps the manufacturer of the rubber?
thanks again

1Time
01-15-2008, 12:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Douggie:</font><hr> I am looking at a Peter Vitalie table. It would have 1.5' slate, and 5 bolt rails. It sounds well constructed. Unfortunately, there is not a table in the showroom to test. What questions should one ask about the cushions to ensure they are of very high quality? k-66? 100% gum rubber? perhaps the manufacturer of the rubber?
thanks again <hr /></blockquote>
I can't help you with that specifically since I really don't know much at all about the construction of cushions. Perhaps someone else here can help you.

An additional way of going about this is to call various billiards shops locally and other places toll free like the internet sites and talk to the salesmen. I would even go so far as to task them with researching your questions for you if they don't happen to know off hand. A good salesman will offer this service for you without you having to ask.

Personally, I would not consider buying a pool table without first shooting on that very table or one that's the same model.

DeadCrab
01-15-2008, 12:28 PM
If the rails are loose, any cushion will play badly. Slate thickness has nothing to do with how the cushions play.

If a manufacturer is using 1.5" slate and 5 rail bolts, it would be a surprise if they would skimp on cushions.

Over on the AZ mechanics board there was some recent discussion about how little some pool table salesmen know about their product. If you want to know about materials used, I would go to the manufacturer.

Jude_Rosenstock
01-15-2008, 12:33 PM
Cushion rubbers are very important. IMO, much better than cushion foam or the cushion pill.

bradb
01-15-2008, 04:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Douggie:</font><hr> Hello,
Looking at buying a nice table.
I am wondering how important cushion rubber is to the playability of the table. I was told that 99% of the liveliness of the cushions is due to the tightness of the rails, and the slate thickness. I just want to get some independent information from some folks who know much more than myself.
thank you!
<hr /></blockquote>

If you are buying a good quality name brand table then the better cushions will come with it. That goes for all the fixtures, slate, etc. The only option is cloth which is fairly standard on most tables with Simonis being the option. Most casual players won't notice the difference between the normal to the best cloth.

A good table is going to cost you at least 2,500 dollars or more for an 8 x 10.

Do a lot of research on tables as there are some problems in the pool table market and its buyer beware! -brad