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View Full Version : Ferrule glue?



dutchboy
01-29-2008, 09:50 AM
Any particular glue appropriate for ferrules? I'd like to do it here at home rather than take it in..Wood glue? To strong?

Artemus
01-29-2008, 09:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dutchboy:</font><hr> Any particular glue appropriate for ferrules? I'd like to do it here at home rather than take it in..Wood glue? To strong? <hr /></blockquote>

How do you plan on getting the old ferrule off and what happens if you damage a tenon?

Ralph_Kramden
01-29-2008, 11:00 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dutchboy:</font><hr> Any particular glue appropriate for ferrules? I'd like to do it here at home rather than take it in..Wood glue? To strong? <hr /></blockquote>

Some ferrules are screwed on, some pressed on and others glued on. I had to have a ferrule custom made for an older Adam cue that had the wood tenon threaded and I couldn't find one to fit.

If the ferrule is straight sided and pulls off it can be glued back on with Gorilla Glue because it swells as it sets up and will fill any gaps.

wolfdancer
01-30-2008, 01:18 AM
If your ferrule is threaded, you should take it to a cue repairman. They just cut off the old ferrule, drill out a hole for a new dowel, and replace it and the ferrule.
I had an old ferrule "machine" once, but never used it as I bought a lathe (Cue smith) shortly after...
you can buy a threaded ferrule and dowel...Elmer's glue works fine, but I also prefer Gorilla glue.

killerstroke
01-30-2008, 11:39 AM
You can remove the ferrule by heating it which softens the glue. If it was threaded on the threads would be re-tapped to clean them up. The tye of glue can be tricky because glues create heat and expand. A typical instant glue should be fine. Most of the time a ferrule may have a glue hole in the top to let it escape other wise pressure may build up and you won't be able to get it on completely. Some cuemakers put grooves on the inside of the ferrule for more surface area for the glue. There is much more to this process than you think. IMHO put up the money, about $20, and have an experienced person fix your ferrule and tip.

Ralph_Kramden
01-31-2008, 12:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote killerstroke:</font><hr> IMHO put up the money, about $20, and have an experienced person fix your ferrule and tip. <hr /></blockquote>
I hate to spend $20 on my $5 cue... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

killerstroke
02-01-2008, 10:43 AM
Isn't the tip the most important part of the cue? The choice is yours. If you can find a ferrule that fits the diameter of your shaft and fits properly over the tenon. Glue it on. Make sure the face is flat. Glue tip on, shave to the ferrule dia and shape your golden. Good Luck.

KellyStick
02-04-2008, 12:38 PM
This was already partially mentioned above. My shaft was cracked and I did not want to lose my ivory ferrule. I asked my cuemaker to swap ferrules to another shaft. He put the shaft in the lathe as he always does to sand it and shape the tip as well as cut off the old tips. He took a piece of thick leather and held it on the ferrule as it spun. It got quite hot and eventually came of with yellowish sticky glue oozing out. As I understand this was wood glue (I asked). I do wood working and was not aware of this about wood glue. He had also made the shaft so he knew how it was put on, that might be an important consideration? The hard part for the laymen might be having the ability to get the right amount of heat without over/under-heating. I suspect a torch might be too much. A hair dryer probably not enough. An industrial heat gun maybe but I don't know. Boiling water? I actually have a wood lathe that is big enough to hold a shaft but I don't have the set-up to hold a cue. I'll probably just keep paying for this service.