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CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 07:33 AM
Just curious, for champion level, at what age do you think one should start playing pool and at what age do you think their game starts to diminish,if any,and why?


Carol

Deeman3
02-14-2008, 08:15 AM
I think, in most cases, it is almost worthless to begin earlier than about age 10 or so as most don't have the motor control skills and it seems many pick up bad habits from being small; ie: strange strokes, bent arms, etc.

I think skills begin to diminish in your 40's in most cases but some play well into their 70's perhaps because they learn so many moves and play smarter. In professional play, eyesight and stamina are both things that seem to go.

I think the women have the potential to play well into their later years as they seem to keep it together longer.

At older years, many of us seem to fight the boredom factor as well. While still fun, after so many years, it's a little harder to get up for the game. Just my thought.

Artemus
02-14-2008, 08:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman3:</font><hr> I think, in most cases, it is almost worthless to begin earlier than about age 10 or so as most don't have the motor control skills and it seems many pick up bad habits from being small; ie: strange strokes, bent arms, etc.

<font color="red"> How do you explain Mosconi, Jean Balukas, Landon Shuffett, Wanderone, and a number of others?
Here's a link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Balukas
where Balukas is doing an exhibition at age 6. I don't think there's any limit to how early you can start, albeit on a mini table with small balls and cue. That's when motor skills, hand/eye coordination develop the fastest. Tiger Woods started hitting a golf ball when he was 2 and on the Merv Griffin show at either age 3 or 4. </font color>

I think skills begin to diminish in your 40's in most cases but some play well into their 70's perhaps because they learn so many moves and play smarter. In professional play, eyesight and stamina are both things that seem to go.

<font color="red"> Eyesight is very important, no question! </font color>

I think the women have the potential to play well into their later years as they seem to keep it together longer.

<font color="red"> But NONE ever have. </font color>

At older years, many of us seem to fight the boredom factor as well. While still fun, after so many years, it's a little harder to get up for the game. Just my thought. <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="red"> You won't get bored if you're playing for money, unless losing it doesn't put much of a dent in the pocket. I think focus and the ability to concentrate for long periods of time diminish and most importantly, KILLER INSTINCT. It isn't a matter of going into a match just "wanting" to win,"hope" to win or even finish. Killer instinct is when you "HAVE" to win and nothing else matters even if it's against your own grandma. (or trying to whip up real good on grandma Carol. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif</font color>

Deeman3
02-14-2008, 09:02 AM
While there are plenty of examples of people starting early, there is little evidence that starting early was what made them great players. Many don't start until their teens and have plenty of success. There are examples of people having strange strokes from starting early. of course, we don't know if they might have been better if they had starting later.

I will admit to your superior knowledge about the boredom factor. You may be older but at 55 I do find it boreing at times, even for money and I never played your Aunt Carol, that I recall. Could you describe her?

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 09:17 AM
Hey Deeman,
[ QUOTE ]
eyesight and stamina are both things that seem to go.
<hr /></blockquote>
Hmmm, I agree with that-I've always had to build up on carbs,proteins,natural sugars the night before a tournament and I can see far,but not close-I have to look and look again on a close shot!
Have a great day!
Carol /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 09:21 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Killer instinct is when you "HAVE" to win and nothing else matters even if it's against your own grandma <hr /></blockquote>

Ha,Ha, Dont be getting all jealous on me there,Grandpa,ha ha! /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
Honestly, my first inspiration ,was after seeing a special on Robin Dobson-3 children- similar prediacment !
Carol

Artemus
02-14-2008, 09:29 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman3:</font><hr> While there are plenty of examples of people starting early, there is little evidence that starting early was what made them great players.

<font color="red"> What evidence is there that it DIDN'T make them a great player? I can only speak from personal experience, but my pappy started pitching a rubber ball to me as I swung a tiny sawed off wooden bat somewhere around 2 1/2 years old and by the time I hit age 10 and Little League, I was a stand out. Then when I hit 14 other interests took over and that was the end of baseball, but it might have gone a lot further if given a chance.

The ONLY negative I see as a possible problem when starting early has nothing to do with developing the skills because I feel it's a benefit, but it has to do with the burnout factor.
</font color>

Many don't start until their teens and have plenty of success. There are examples of people having strange strokes from starting early. of course, we don't know if they might have been better if they had starting later.

<font color="red"> They might have strange strokes, like Keith McCready, but they still know how to pocket the balls from the early training. </font color>

I will admit to your superior knowledge about the boredom factor. You may be older but at 55 I do find it boreing at times, even for money and I never played your Aunt Carol, that I recall. Could you describe her? <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="red"> It isn't my "aunt" Carol. It's "grandma" Carol (not my grandma either) She lives in New Yawk. If you want to whip up on her, I'll try to set up a match. </font color> /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Artemus
02-14-2008, 09:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote CarolNYC:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
Killer instinct is when you "HAVE" to win and nothing else matters even if it's against your own grandma <hr /></blockquote>

Ha,Ha, Dont be getting all jealous on me there,Grandpa,ha ha! /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
Honestly, my first inspiration ,was after seeing a special on Robin Dobson-3 children- similar prediacment !
Carol
<hr /></blockquote>

I'll have you know I have NO grandchildren so I ain't a grandpa, grandma. I'm only 24 years old. (mentally at least) /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SKennedy
02-14-2008, 10:03 AM
I think we don't give young kids enough credit for their capacity to learn and we waste most of the best time period for learning...assuming they can handle the physical portion. I'd say as soon as they can reasonably handle a cue and manage the physical portion of the game let them play with proper instruction.
I hate to compare people to dogs, but years ago the concept with dog training (duck dogs) was to wait until they were at least 6 months old or even 1 year. That's very old school now and most start training their pups at the ripe old age of 7 weeks...or at least the point where the puppy recognizes it's own name. Now, most dogs are pretty much trained by 6 months of age. However, all that being said, while one may start learning sooner than others, those who start early can certainly get passed up by those who start much later..so in the end I still think your ultimate skill level is based on ability that is mostly independent upon what age you start. Several people were named who started early, but you can name just as many who started much later. All things being equal I do think those who started earlier have an edvantage.

As to losing it as one get's older....I'm now 52 and can't shoot the shots I use to consistently make during my early 20's. On the other hand, I have more knowledge of the game, which helps balance things out. However, I put my money on nyself when I was in my youth over the guy I see in the mirror today. But, I also played 2 to 3 hours every day back then and only play once a week on league night now.
When I tell these youngsters on my team that their game will drop off when they get to be older (like me), they look at me like I'm nuts. Just like the young athletic short-stop kid I played baseball with use to laugh at me when I told him when he got into his 40's (like me at the time) he would slow down, reflexes diminish, etc. and he thought I was wrong. He quit playing by early 30's....

That's a lot of crapola I just said without really saying anything important....as usual....to really answer your question, I think the age of champions would range between early 20's to 50, maybe 55. It would be interesting to see what the age range is for past champions...and when they started playing pool.

JoeW
02-14-2008, 10:05 AM
It is unlikely that a child will have the hand eye coordination to play well much before the age of 12 -15 or so. There are exceptions and child prodigies in earlier years are known. In general the nervous system needs a certain level of maturity to function at the level required for the sustained concentration that is needed to play at a high level.

I am 64 and have worn glasses all my life. About two weeks ago I bought a pair of billiards glasses from Gordon Harrison in Quebec (link here Gordon Harrison (http://www.billiard-eyeglasses.com/) )

They look a little goofy and I feel like I am cheating, guess that is why they used to be called cheaters. I got an eye exam especially for playing pool. The optician took a little off the prescription and with these glasses I can see at the pool table like a 15 year old. The glasses were more than worth the $300.00.

The stamina thing is not an issue if there is good competition. Most (not all) of my friends, men and women, are near my age and we often play on Wednesday in a league and on Saturday nights from 7:00 (PM) until 1:00 AM. I still have sessions that last until the wee hours of the morning (such as 4:00 or 5:00 AM) when the right people are involved. Some of my friends play in two leagues and on Sat. However, these people are a little younger say in their 50s.

Personally I have never had the ďkillerĒ instinct and probably do not play as well as some others because of it. But my friends and I love a good game and that keeps one going. One friend is nearly 70 years old and plays as sporty as anyone else (APA 5). So in my thinking, and given that my health is OK I will be playing until I am 75 or so. Of course my wife and I place an emphasis on physical exercise now that we are retired and I swim about Ĺ mile every day or nearly every day.

So from my experience I would say that one should be able to play as well they as ever have until age 70 -75 or so, depending on health conditions.
/ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

PS Interest in the game is probably a primary factor. I do know "old" people who do not play nearly as well as they did. Our house is a vaction resort and we only hang out with like minded people. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

SKennedy
02-14-2008, 10:12 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JoeW:</font><hr> So from my experience I would say that one should be able to play as well they as ever have until age 70 -75 or so, depending on health conditions.
/ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Only if the senility thing has kicked in as well! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
I think Deeman was talking about the intense focus required to be playing at the pro level, not a local league level. And while I can play for several hours also, when I'm through my neck, shoulders and upper back let me know...whereas in my younger days I could mistreat my body all day long and never feel it! I know that my neck, etc. will get stiff while playing and it has to affect my game to some extent.
I hope I'm still playing at 70 to 75 and if so, I'll be happy regardless of my skill level.

Artemus
02-14-2008, 10:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JoeW:</font><hr> It is unlikely that a child will have the hand eye coordination to play well much before the age of 12 -15 or so. There are exceptions and child prodigies in earlier years are known.
<hr /></blockquote>

Yes, however if they start at a young age they'll be waaay ahead of the 12-15 year olds just starting out when THEY'RE 12-15. It isn't just the physical end of pool, it's also early training for the brain to see the patterns and work your way through them, especially if a knowledgeable mentor/teacher is leading the way.

I know a lot of older men that have been playing for years and STILL play lousy patterns and can't read a table layout.

My wife does some substitute teaching from elementary through 12th grade and I can't believe what the kids are being taught in math class at an early age compared to when I was in school. I don't think we should ever discount what kids can or can't do.

Hey Joe, I'll bet YOUR life savings against MY life savings if you'd like to match your hand/eye coordination against an 8 year old in a variety of video games. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

JoeW
02-14-2008, 10:42 AM
On the pro level thing. I think it is kinda like me and psychology. I canít really speak to pro pool player as I simply do not have that kind of skill. However, I was a professional psychologist.

Psychology is basically boring to me. Oh I still read in the area and keep up with many of the latest ideas but not nearly like I did. The redundancy factor is far too high. What I know solves most of the problems I encounter. Finally, I am acutely aware of the idea that I am past it because I have not paid sufficient attention to my chosen profession over the last ten years Ė that is one of the reasons I retired, bored and too out of date.

On the other hand the new love in my life is pool and there is lots to learn. I actually play much better now than I did when I was younger. I am perhaps twice as good as when I was 40. While not pro level, by any means, my interest is as sustaining as it ever was in some of the other things I have pursued in life.

I suspect the same thing can be said for pro pool players. Iíll bet that they get bored with the game at some point and go looking for something else to do.

Playing pool is not a physical sport like tennis or snow skiing. It is about finesse and strategy. It has enough physical activity to keep me interested but not so much as to exhaust me Ė I like that. I donít know what pro pool players take up when they retire but I suspect that they do not have to retire after the age thing has kicked in. My wife now calls it OAD (old age disease)

JoeW
02-14-2008, 10:48 AM
One of my grandsons is three years old. His high game on Wei boweling is 223, mine is 183 (or so). So you already won the bet. And yeah I agree that stupidity is a life long problem for some people. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Artemus
02-14-2008, 10:50 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JoeW:</font><hr>
I suspect the same thing can be said for pro pool players. Iíll bet that they get bored with the game at some point and go looking for something else to do.
<hr /></blockquote>

Your suspicions have a strong foundation. They get bored with being broke. Typically they "retire" to go to work.

wolfdancer
02-14-2008, 11:45 AM
In last year's Western BCA regionals......the 70 yr old Jonathon, won both the open 8 and 9 ball tournaments...500 plus players in each.
Then a week later won the ACS regional 8 ball tournament...250 players (aprox). Another guy from the Seattle area, at 73 is even better....comes down here for the bi-monthly $$ added events, and has won it, and always high up in the money.
I took the game up in my mid 30's and my skills began to fade in my late 30's.....now I can't run 3 balls even if you spot me the first one

bradb
02-14-2008, 12:08 PM
Carol, when you are able to get up to the table and hit the Qball, its time to start!

When you can't get up anymore....sit and dream about it! /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

catscradle
02-14-2008, 01:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman3:</font><hr> ...
I will admit to your superior knowledge about the boredom factor. You may be older but at 55 I do find it boreing at times, ... <hr /></blockquote>

I solved the boredom problem, I didn't start playing serious pool until I was 56 when all my kids were grown. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I agree with your assessment of the youth factor. Mosconi, Balukas, Shuffett, etc. played young because the were good, not visa-versa.

catscradle
02-14-2008, 01:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JoeW:</font><hr> ...I am 64 and have worn glasses all my life. About two weeks ago I bought a pair of billiards glasses from Gordon Harrison in Quebec (link here Gordon Harrison (http://www.billiard-eyeglasses.com/) )

They look a little goofy and I feel like I am cheating, guess that is why they used to be called cheaters. I got an eye exam especially for playing pool. The optician took a little off the prescription and with these glasses I can see at the pool table like a 15 year old. The glasses were more than worth the $300.00.
... <hr /></blockquote>

A little after 50 my vision started getting better and hasn't stopped yet (I was 62 yesterday), the doctor said it was not an unusual thing in people who been near-sight most of their lives. At any rate, I thought about glasses like that (the Decot's), but I don't really think they will help that much. I do have a second pair though with a yellow tint for the lights and the noses pieces set in a way to raise the lense position relative to my eyes, they work pretty good. I also tried shooting with a little bit weaker prescription and didn't find that to made much difference.
I wouldn't worry about looking weird in them (I assume you don't either), you're there for the pool right. As I'm fond of saying when my wife makes fun of the out of style glasses I wear day to day (much like the pair you wear in your picture), I wear glasses to see better not to look better.

Billy_Bob
02-14-2008, 01:36 PM
Seems to me that younger people "know it all" and will not listen to instructions from others, will not practice, etc., but they are physically in tip top condition!

Older people will learn, have patience, practice, but are not in tip top physical condition (sight, stamina, etc...)

Now if only you could find a young person who had the qualities of an older person....

SKennedy
02-14-2008, 01:37 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JoeW:</font><hr> On the pro level thing. I think it is kinda like me and psychology. I canít really speak to pro pool player as I simply do not have that kind of skill. However, I was a professional psychologist.

Psychology is basically boring to me. Oh I still read in the area and keep up with many of the latest ideas but not nearly like I did. The redundancy factor is far too high. What I know solves most of the problems I encounter. Finally, I am acutely aware of the idea that I am past it because I have not paid sufficient attention to my chosen profession over the last ten years Ė that is one of the reasons I retired, bored and too out of date.

On the other hand the new love in my life is pool and there is lots to learn. I actually play much better now than I did when I was younger. I am perhaps twice as good as when I was 40. While not pro level, by any means, my interest is as sustaining as it ever was in some of the other things I have pursued in life.

I suspect the same thing can be said for pro pool players. Iíll bet that they get bored with the game at some point and go looking for something else to do.

Playing pool is not a physical sport like tennis or snow skiing. It is about finesse and strategy. It has enough physical activity to keep me interested but not so much as to exhaust me Ė I like that. I donít know what pro pool players take up when they retire but I suspect that they do not have to retire after the age thing has kicked in. My wife now calls it OAD (old age disease)
<hr /></blockquote>

Well, we're just glad you like the sport and hope you stay with it. I may get a little bored after some time with it, but I always come back to it. And you are right, you can play with age. It's just a fun sport that one should enjoy, even if you can or cannot play as well as when younger. Sounds like you and your group have a lot of fun, and not just about pool, but life in general.....and that's the real key IMO.

SKennedy
02-14-2008, 01:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> .....now I can't run 3 balls even if you spot me the first one <hr /></blockquote>

OK now, who are you trying to hustle on that one?

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 02:05 PM
Ha,ha,ha
Well,dont be knocking that grandma thing going on-he came 5 yrs. AFTER I was playing and believe me, it wasnt MY intention-and he did become NUMBER ONE priority-s$$t happens-the game will always be there /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif
The one good thing about grandkids is, after you play with them,they go home!
Carol~proud to be a "mams" (he cant say "g' yet /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 02:10 PM
Hi Steve,
[ QUOTE ]
we don't give young kids enough credit for their capacity to learn <hr /></blockquote>
Yes, they're like sponges!

[ QUOTE ]
It would be interesting to see what the age range is for past champions...and when they started playing pool. <hr /></blockquote>
also, the age of oldest player currently on tour-
Thats one unique factor I find in pool,there really isnt an age as compared to other sports,like,football or baseball,its 35????
Today, I'd say most of the top players are below 35,thats just a guess!
Carol

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 02:13 PM
Jack,
Is there a senior professional tour?
Carol

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 02:13 PM
[ QUOTE ]
When you can't get up anymore....sit and dream about it <hr /></blockquote>

Ah,ha ha ha ha-I like that!
Carol

catscradle
02-14-2008, 02:17 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote CarolNYC:</font><hr> Jack,
Is there a senior professional tour?
Carol <hr /></blockquote>
There was I'm sure, but I think it may have collapsed.

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 02:18 PM
Hi Billy-Bob,
[ QUOTE ]
Seems to me that younger people "know it all" and will not listen to instructions from others <hr /></blockquote>

Is this from your experience of teaching kids?
Interesting.....
Carol

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 02:23 PM
No kidding,Steve?
I never knew that!
[ QUOTE ]
but I think it may have collapsed.


<hr /></blockquote>
Maybe not enough seniors were interested /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif
Carol

SKennedy
02-14-2008, 02:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote CarolNYC:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
When you can't get up anymore....sit and dream about it <hr /></blockquote>

Ah,ha ha ha ha-I like that!
Carol <hr /></blockquote>

Carol, I'm not real sure he was talking about Pool? /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

Jager85
02-14-2008, 02:47 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> Seems to me that younger people "know it all" and will not listen to instructions from others, will not practice, etc., but they are physically in tip top condition!

Older people will learn, have patience, practice, but are not in tip top physical condition (sight, stamina, etc...)

Now if only you could find a young person who had the qualities of an older person....

<hr /></blockquote>

This I have noticed personally. My step son is 9 now and I have tried working with him a few times over the past 2 years and he is a "know it all". He holds the cue wrong, has a funky bridge, and miscues on nearly every shot. He will not listen to anything, may try it once and that is it. We went bowling last month and I had the same problem. If he wants it some day and is ready I believe he will come to me.

JoeW
02-14-2008, 02:58 PM
Hey Carol, here is one you can use as needed.

We tell our kids that grand parents cannot spoil grandchildren - it is impossible, we just love em and send em home. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Yeah, in answer to someone's comment it is all about the good times, old time rock and roll, good friends, good food, family and a bar in the pool room. Life doesn't get any better than that.

One way to teach the young "know it alls" is to ask them how to do something first. Once they get respect, they give it back. Works with my grand kids /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

JoeW
02-14-2008, 03:04 PM
About the young prodigies, I would bet that they did not start winning until they were in their teens, regardles of when they started to play.

Of course someone can give one or two exceptions.

wolfdancer
02-14-2008, 03:08 PM
In English grammar, a pronoun is often implied, as in the
sentence "Go" where "you" is understood.
In this case "it" is the implied omitted word.

SKennedy
02-14-2008, 03:31 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> In English grammar, a pronoun is often implied, as in the
sentence "Go" where "you" is understood.
In this case "it" is the implied omitted word. <hr /></blockquote>

And I really like to "imply" a lot.

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 04:19 PM
Hi,
[ QUOTE ]
I have tried working with him a few times over the past 2 years and he is a "know it all". <hr /></blockquote>
My daughter,18,just recently became interested and I've noticed,when I'd offer her my advice,I'd get that "I know Ma" response BUT,when we'd play at a friends house,when THEY offered,she'd listen, so, sometimes a parent/child relationship isnt a good teaching relationship,ya know what I mean?

I think parents,in general, want their kid to excel in everything,so,its a tough situation-I think sometimes its better,for both, that an outsider ,who has more experience in teaching,enter the picture /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

When MY child is ready, that is the route I'll take!
Carol

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 04:28 PM
[ QUOTE ]
grand parents cannot spoil grandchildren - it is impossible, we just love em and send em home.
<hr /></blockquote>

Absolutely,Dr.Joe,
My grandsons a blonde-haired blue-eyed piece of work,little gentleman-polite as hell and when he meets you,he'll reach his hand out and say "nice to meet you!" You'd love him-yes,he's spoiled with love and attention!
You mentioned your grandchild on the Wei,(btw,I love that game)well, I bought my daughters Laptops,he just turned 2 in July,I swear,he can use that laptop better than me-unbelievable!

oh, and I like your harmonious lifestyle-very nice! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Carol

JoeW
02-14-2008, 04:31 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote catscradle:</font><hr>
), the doctor said it was not an unusual thing in people who been near-sight most of their lives. At any rate, I thought about glasses like that (the Decot's), but I don't really think they will help that much. I do have a second pair though with a yellow tint for the lights and the noses pieces set in a way to raise the lense position relative to my eyes, they work pretty good. I also tried shooting with a little bit weaker prescription and didn't find that to made much difference.
I wouldn't worry about looking weird in them (I assume you don't either), you're there for the pool right. As I'm fond of saying when my wife makes fun of the out of style glasses I wear day to day (much like the pair you wear in your picture), I wear glasses to see better not to look better.
<hr /></blockquote>

What --my glasses are out of style, I didn't know that!

Oh weel, never have been big on style anyway.

CarolNYC
02-14-2008, 04:32 PM
[ QUOTE ]
Carol, I'm not real sure he was talking about Pool? <hr /></blockquote>
Gotcha!

Ha,ha,ha,Okay, well then ,as long as it had to do with ANY "balls &amp; shafts" /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif
Carol

Cydpkt
02-14-2008, 04:56 PM
Yeah its a bummer when your opponent has so much time as they are watching you to comment on your glasses. Hey keep them sitting and let them evaluate your shoes, and pants too. Soon enough the match will be over and they can watch someone else as well.

bradb
02-14-2008, 06:42 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SKennedy:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote CarolNYC:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
When you can't get up anymore....sit and dream about it <hr /></blockquote>

Ah,ha ha ha ha-I like that!
Carol <hr /></blockquote>

Carol, I'm not real sure he was talking about Pool? /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Steve, Carol, ain't pool the same as sex? Its just a different kind of passion! Given the two though I think I would probably settle for a race to 9. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

catscradle
02-15-2008, 07:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SKennedy:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote CarolNYC:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
When you can't get up anymore....sit and dream about it <hr /></blockquote>

Ah,ha ha ha ha-I like that!
Carol <hr /></blockquote>

Carol, I'm not real sure he was talking about Pool? /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif <hr /></blockquote>

I'm pretty sure it was a tour not just random events. If you got to accu-stats and look at the 9-ball listings, there are several senior events there. If they still had one going around and it came near here I'd probably enter at least once. Yeah, I'd get spanked real bad, but I'd maybe get to play some greats.

catscradle
02-15-2008, 07:58 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JoeW:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote catscradle:</font><hr> ... As I'm fond of saying when my wife makes fun of the out of style glasses I wear day to day (much like the pair you wear in your picture), I wear glasses to see better not to look better.
<hr /></blockquote>


What --my glasses are out of style, I didn't know that!

Oh weel, never have been big on style anyway.
<hr /></blockquote>
That's what the Mrs. tells me and she'd know. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
I don't have a URL to show my picture, so you can see my lovely glasses here: My pic over on IP forums. (http://www.insidepoolmag.com/forums/members/catscradle.html). I like the old-school black and white effect.

Billy_Bob
02-15-2008, 08:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote CarolNYC:</font><hr>Is this from your experience of teaching kids?<hr /></blockquote>

Of those who do not want to listen to others advice, I have mostly seen those in their late teens/early 20's do this. And mostly I have seen other people trying to give them a bit of advice. In one ear and out the other!

As to myself, I will sometimes hear other players complain that they can't do something in pool they would like to be able to do. Then I will say I can show them a few things if they are interested...

Well the younger players rarely take me up on the offer - maybe 1 out of 10.

With older players, it is: Sure! Show me something to practice.

Then with the very very good players (usually older), if there is anything new to learn, they are all ears. They will drop everything and want to learn right now. Then they will also share what they know with me, so there is an exchange of information. I learn things too.

SKennedy
02-15-2008, 10:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote CarolNYC:</font><hr> Hi,
&lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
I have tried working with him a few times over the past 2 years and he is a "know it all". <hr /></blockquote>
My daughter,18,just recently became interested and I've noticed,when I'd offer her my advice,I'd get that "I know Ma" response BUT,when we'd play at a friends house,when THEY offered,she'd listen, so, sometimes a parent/child relationship isnt a good teaching relationship,ya know what I mean?

I think parents,in general, want their kid to excel in everything,so,its a tough situation-I think sometimes its better,for both, that an outsider ,who has more experience in teaching,enter the picture /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

When MY child is ready, that is the route I'll take!
Carol <hr /></blockquote>

I've always had a great relationship with my son, who is now 25. When he was about 12 or 13 I took him to someone for a pitching lesson for the first time. While the pitching coach told my son the same exact things I had been telling him for the last 2 years, he was much more effective. He accomplished more in less than 1 hour than I had in about 2 years. Why? My son listened and was willing to not only listen but to execute as well. And the "coach" had a real knack for evaluating a kid and understanding the best way to get through and communicate with them. Today, my son is a baseball coach and a pitching instructor. On the other hand...my daughter, who is an 18 y/o freshman in college will not listen to anyone. Her only priority in college seems to be "social activities." Dependent upon her grades this semester, which I fear are not good, it's all about to come tumbling down when Dad tells her to get a job, she's not going back to private college where she plays soccer and is also a cheerleader, and she has to pay her own tuition at the local Junior College. I'm afraid Dad's going to have to get "mean!"