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New2Pool
03-18-2008, 02:31 PM
I apologize for asking a question that I suspect has been answered before but the search feature does not work for me since the forum update.

I have searched the Internet via Google and I have found many different ways recommended to clean a shaft. Many of the answers specifically say that the other ways that are recommended will ruin the shaft. How is the best way to clean a shaft? Can you use an oil, such as lemon tree oil, on the shaft?

Thank you in advance.

underdog
03-18-2008, 04:11 PM
I take a "magic eraser" sponge and put a few drops of rubbing alcohol on it and wipe down the shaft a few times using a fair amount of pressure. Then I wipe off the excess with a dry towel or paper towel. You'll be surprised at how much crap comes off. Just be careful around the ferrul area. don't want to get liquid in there if avoidable. Hope this helps.

bsmutz
03-18-2008, 04:13 PM
The absolute best that I've ever tried (and I think I've tried two) is Magic Eraser by Mr. Clean. For less than $3 (prior to gas going up above $3), you could get a couple of these in a package. They resemble a sponge. Just get it wet, wring it out really good (I blot it with a towel) so that it is barely damp, and wipe away all the chalk and hand oils. Burnish with a clean, dry cloth or piece of leather and it will look/feel like new. From what I hear, rubbing alcohol works really well, too.

JoeW
03-18-2008, 04:20 PM
I have been cleaning cues for many years and have tried many systems because I like a clean stick. About one year ago someone mentioned trying Mr Clean's Magic Eraser. You can buy these in most any grocery store. I have found there is nothing better to return a cue stick to a like new condition.

Dampen the sponge like Magic Eraser and wipe down the cue including the ferrell. Wipe the excess moisture (there should be very little) and the grime off the cue with a cotton towel.

You can use a dollar bill to burnish the stick if you want to be like the old time pool players.

The best way to slick the cue that I have found is to use an old piece of leather. Could be a piece cut from a belt, the tongue of a shoe or whatever. Soft natural leather is all that is needed.

Wind the leather around the cue and move it as fast as you can up and down the first 18 inches or so. This will heat up and seal the cue. It is almost ready to use.

Wet the edge of the cue tip liberally with saliva and then burnish this with a dollar bill or the back of a piece of emery cloth (that is what I use). This will make the tip look nice but more importantly it will help to harden it and it will be less likely to mushroom.

Hope that helps -- Of course there are other ways, seems everyone has their own way.

JoeW
03-18-2008, 04:22 PM
In the time it took me to write my post two others said the same thing. I guess there are some common answers :-)

wolfdancer
03-18-2008, 04:31 PM
Bill, I use the magic eraser myself, but just bought some "wipes" from Mueller for $11, and think I got robbed. I believe Baby wipes would do much better....but wonder if they would harm the shaft?
I bought furniture wipes from Target for $3, and they seem to be doing a good job,and they also have a nice lemon smell ....I "stink" but the cue smells nice.

1Time
03-18-2008, 05:52 PM
That magic eraser sounds like a good product. I'd like to clean the ferrule of my cue with it.

But for cleaning the shaft of my cue, I prefer using a dry, green cleaning pad. They're cheap and work quite well. I've read online these are not to be used because they remove wood like sandpaper; however I've not had this problem. I just lightly slick it up and down a few times and the cue is good to go. No sawdust in the cleaning pad to show weight being removed from the shaft, no apparent reduction to the shaft's diameter, just a smooth clean shaft every time.

I don't recommend using a bill since it will stain the shaft.

pooltchr
03-18-2008, 06:19 PM
Those green nylon pads are abrasive. While you may not see any dust, if you look very closely at your shaft, you will see tiny hairline scratches in the wood.
Steve

1Time
03-18-2008, 09:13 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Those green nylon pads are abrasive. </div></div>
Sure a cleaning pad is abrasive. That's how it works.
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">While you may not see any dust, if you look very closely at your shaft, you will see tiny hairline scratches in the wood.</div></div>
I don't see or feel any hairline scratches on the shaft of my cue. It just looks clean and feels smooth.

And those pads work really well on house cues too. It takes a little longer and more pressure, but it cleans them right up.

pooltchr
03-19-2008, 04:22 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1Time</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Those green nylon pads are abrasive. </div></div>
Sure a cleaning pad is abrasive. That's how it works.
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">While you may not see any dust, if you look very closely at your shaft, you will see tiny hairline scratches in the wood.</div></div>
I don't see or feel any hairline scratches on the shaft of my cue. It just looks clean and feels smooth.

And those pads work really well on house cues too. It takes a little longer and more pressure, but it cleans them right up. </div></div>

By the very nature of the word, abrasive means it scratches the surface. If you agree the pads are abrasives, you must know it is slowly scratching the wood.
Many people use them, but then, many people don't care. Those who don't want to slowly break down the wood fibers would be better off avoiding them. They are no different than sandpaper other than it takes longer for them to have the same effect on the wood.
Steve

New2Pool
03-19-2008, 08:32 AM
Thank you very much to all who responded. It sounds like I should buy some stock in Mr. Clean. But on my budget I will just have to settle for buying the Magic Eraser.

1Time
03-19-2008, 11:03 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">By the very nature of the word, abrasive means it scratches the surface. If you agree the pads are abrasives, you must know it is slowly scratching the wood.
Many people use them, but then, many people don't care. Those who don't want to slowly break down the wood fibers would be better off avoiding them. They are no different than sandpaper other than it takes longer for them to have the same effect on the wood.
Steve </div></div>
No. The the idea is to abrade the dirt and oil build-up on the shaft and not the wood. 3M Scotch-Brite cleaning pads are available in various levels of abrasiveness, from heavy duty to light duty. The common green ones are medium duty, and as such may or may not produce scratches immediately or over time. It depends on the abrasiveness of the cleaning pad, whether the shaft is maple or a softer wood, and how agressively the pad is used.

Years ago I used a green pad on my Dufferin cue and it left tiny visible scratches, which I promptly and easily sanded out with a used piece of 600 grit sand paper. The green pad was too abrasive. Today I'm using a green pad that I've already cleaned other things with so much it looks like a worn piece of scrap carpet. It's abrasiveness is still probably medium duty. To test it out, I roughed it several times over a scrap cue shaft that's warped, dented, and dirty like an old bar cue, and I did so with the intent of creating scratches. However, it simply cleaned up the shaft real nice and smooth and left no visible scratches. But sure enough, there was a tiny amount of a light colored powder on the pad, dust from the wood removed, an inconsequential price to pay for quickly cleaning up a very dirty shaft. Of course with a normal cue, a very light cleaning is all it would take.

Perhaps a light duty cleaning pad would be a better choice, one that's sure to remove only the dirt and oil. I'm tempted to buy one just to see how it compares, but then again the green one I'm using now works just fine. By the way, I have a few years of woodworking experience so I'm not unfamiliar with this subject. I wonder what my local cue maker would say about using a green pad on pool cue shaft. I did notice he had one in his shop the other day.

Stretch
03-19-2008, 11:09 AM
Here's something radical. And it's free! Soak a good peice of paper towel and sqeeze the water out till it's damp. Give the shaft a good going over with that. Believe me you can see how much crap and chalk is comeing off when you see the damp PT after. Then immediately follow the damp and go over it with dry paper towel. This is something you can do on any bathroom break or before play. At home i just use a spritz of windex or windsheild washer or something. Then all that's left to do is put the kind of finsh on you like. Some burnish, some paper, some slick, some just put a glove on. Note: I spoil my shaft and take it in to my cue man for a good treatment once a year so there's nothing too horrid i can do between visits. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif St.

1Time
03-19-2008, 06:06 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Stretch</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Here's something radical. And it's free! Soak a good peice of paper towel and sqeeze the water out till it's damp. Give the shaft a good going over with that. Believe me you can see how much crap and chalk is comeing off when you see the damp PT after. Then immediately follow the damp and go over it with dry paper towel.</div></div>
I don't like the idea of putting water on cue's shaft, and I prefer the convenience and effectiveness of a cleaning pad.

blahblahblahk
03-21-2008, 03:50 PM
Thanks for the tip about the magic eraser. My shaft hasn't been cleaned in years. A couple cleans with the eraser and its good as new. Thanks again.

Heretic
03-21-2008, 06:27 PM
[quote=1Time]<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
I don't like the idea of putting water on cue's shaft, and I prefer the convenience and effectiveness of a cleaning pad. </div></div>

You might not think it damages the shaft, but every time someone brings me a stick for a new tip, I can tell if they use one of these or not..........There is probably a reason most good cue builders advise against these

wolfdancer
03-22-2008, 01:31 AM
I wonder if the white, gray, or maroon pad would be better?
Tempted to buy a box of one of them???
pads (http://www.onlineindustrialsupply.com/handpads.html)

Koenig
03-22-2008, 11:59 PM
Donīt! buy Magic, use it twice every season, damp rag and burnish in between.

Rich R.
03-23-2008, 06:18 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I wonder if the white, gray, or maroon pad would be better?
Tempted to buy a box of one of them???
pads (http://www.onlineindustrialsupply.com/handpads.html) </div></div>
If you must use an abrasive pad, use the gray or the maroon. The white doesn't do much, by itself. It is just too non-abrasive.
Definitely stay away from the green, or anything more abrasive.

Like many others, I have used the Magic Eraser, followed by a damp paper towel and a burnisher, with a lot of success.

JoeW
03-23-2008, 08:36 AM
I have read about soaking cue tips in milk or in gasoline and then compressing the tip in a vice before placing on a cue stick. I think they are called milk duds. This process makes a harder tip. I haven't tried it but it sounds like an interesting idea.

Has anyone tried simply wetting the edge of the cue tip that is already on a stick with milk or some other solution to harden the tip edge? Would that work to retard the mushroom problem that some people have?

My playng stick does not mushroom very much becasue I don't hit hard enough often enough to have that problem. I was simply wondering if others had tried other processes to harden a tip.

I have a Water Buffalo tip on my "Mace" break cue. I think these are in some way treated. Does anyone know what process is used to make a Water Buffal tip. It is extremely hard leather (I think).

JoeW
03-23-2008, 08:54 AM
I had used very fine emory cloth to clean my cues for many years but did not like the idea that a little wood was removed everytime I cleaned the cue. That is why I quit using any type of abrasive.

I have a "Cue Cube" shaft slicker purchased many years ago that I carry wth me. It has the white "Scotch Bright" type of pad on one side and leather on the other side. I do use it on occassion when I am away from home and the stick gets gritty. This particular type of material, that is like Scotch Brite, does not remove any wood but it does remove dirt and grime.

Mr Clean's Magic Eraser is unmatched by anything I have found to return the cue stick's natural color and wood grain. That is why it is my primary stick cleaner. I have cleaned friends' cues that were 10 - 20 years old and had never been cleaned. They were amazed when their sticks looked like new again. I cleaned a 30 year old Dufferin snooker cue that had been used for many years and given to me as a present. When Mr Clean was finished the cue looked brand new and some of my friends do not believe that it is over 30 years old.

The only other commercial products that comes close in my search for a good cleaner was "Dekswood" deck cleaner used striaght from the can and then rinsed with water. Here the problem is the amount of water needed to rinse the cue and the possibility of losening the glue. This is a special problem with laminated cues like the Predator shaft. Then too Dekswood cost about $20.00 a gallon. While it is less expensive than most cue cleaners you do get enough for you and your buddies for a life time.

I suppose that using a solution of tri-sodium phosphate or TSP would also work. This is used in many areas of wood working for cleaning. I have never tried this method. TSP is one of the primary ingredients in many types of wood cleaners.

Majic
03-23-2008, 02:26 PM
I vote for the Majic Eraser...It cleans without removing wood from the shaft and the finished look is great.

Koenig
03-23-2008, 03:31 PM
Maybe I wasīt making myself clear. The eraser opens up the wood totally. Usually you have to use sealer and micro-sand the shaft before burnishing. That is why I said once or twice a season. The damp rag and burnish is between cleanings - to get the shaft to not being dirty.

1Time
03-23-2008, 09:25 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I wonder if the white, gray, or maroon pad would be better?
Tempted to buy a box of one of them???
pads (http://www.onlineindustrialsupply.com/handpads.html) </div></div>
The maroon is the one just slightly more abrasive than the white. I can't imagine either not working well for the light cleaning that's periodically needed for a shaft. I suggest trying either for yourself before buying a box though.

1Time
03-23-2008, 09:32 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Koenig</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Maybe I wasīt making myself clear. The eraser opens up the wood totally. Usually you have to use sealer and micro-sand the shaft before burnishing. That is why I said once or twice a season. The damp rag and burnish is between cleanings - to get the shaft to not being dirty. </div></div>
This is what I thought you were getting at. But I've never found a need to bother with any of this. Just run a cleaning pad over the shaft lightly a few times and it's good to go.

1Time
03-23-2008, 09:35 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Majic</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I vote for the Majic Eraser...It cleans without removing wood from the shaft and the finished look is great. </div></div>
I vote for this Mr. Clean product and a lightly abrasive cleaning pad since neither removes wood when used properly.

Bambu
03-24-2008, 09:43 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Koenig</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Maybe I wasīt making myself clear. The eraser opens up the wood totally. Usually you have to use sealer and micro-sand the shaft before burnishing. That is why I said once or twice a season. The damp rag and burnish is between cleanings - to get the shaft to not being dirty. </div></div>

Does that mean mr clean isnt good to use on a regular basis? I loved a product called all american cue cleaner, but it has been taken off the market.

Majic
03-24-2008, 12:08 PM
I smooth the shaft after using the magic eraser and burnish it. I also use a dry film lubricant afterwards and this helps seal as well as provide a slick surface.

1Time
03-24-2008, 12:17 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Majic</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I smooth the shaft after using the magic eraser and burnish it. I also use a dry film lubricant afterwards and this helps seal as well as provide a slick surface. </div></div>
Sounds like a good system for caring for your cue's shaft. I have to wonder though how a shaft cleaned in this way feels as compared to one that's cleaned only with a cleaning pad. I might want to try using this cleaning system once I get the magic eraser and a piece of leather for burnishing. You said you smooth the shaft after using the magic eraser. But how do you smooth it? Do you use a slicker or a cleaning pad or what? And, what is a dry film lubricant? I would not know how to find this. Thanks

Majic
03-24-2008, 05:18 PM
I use 1500 or 2000 grit sand paper and either leather or a wooden spoon to burnish the shaft. You can send me a PM for the dry film lubricant.

Bambu
03-25-2008, 08:59 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Majic</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I smooth the shaft after using the magic eraser and burnish it. I also use a dry film lubricant afterwards and this helps seal as well as provide a slick surface.</div></div>

Thanks, but that sounds too complicated for me. I need something I can use every day, like the all american stuff I had before. Rub it in, wipe it off with a clean rag(no sandpaper).

Majic
03-25-2008, 10:33 AM
I don't do this everyday. I just wipe the shaft down with a damp cloth and dry it with a dry cloth when it get blue. Is that simple enough?

Majic
03-25-2008, 11:12 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Majic</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I smooth the shaft after using the magic eraser and burnish it. I also use a dry film lubricant afterwards and this helps seal as well as provide a slick surface.</div></div>

Thanks, but that sounds too complicated for me. I need something I can use every day, like the all american stuff I had before. Rub it in, wipe it off with a clean rag(no sandpaper). </div></div>

The object of what I do to the shaft is to provide a slick finish and not just clean it. If you just want to clean the shaft then do it any way you wish. And really after the shaft is prepared with dry film lubricant the only cleaning required is just to wipe it with a damp cloth and dry during play and after play. After some time, the lubricant will begin to wear from the chalk, and you can apply additional coats of lubricant. The result is a very slick shaft. It does take a little effort and the result is pretty good, but if you want the All American Quickie then go for it.

Bambu
03-25-2008, 02:58 PM
That sounds pretty good, Majic. So what is dry lubricant, and where do ya get it?

cushioncrawler
03-25-2008, 03:15 PM
I cleaned a few of my (snooker) cues last week, just the working bits of the shafts actually, they were starting to feel sticky. I uzed 1200 grit sandpaper (grey paper). I uzually uze uzed sandpaper, but on this occazion it woz fairly new so i didnt press hard. I burnish with the back of the sandpaper -- but burnishing iz a waste of time (dont know why i do it), the shaft feels just az slick without burnishing. Two of the cues hadnt been "cleaned" before (they are newish), and i noticed that the paper quickly filled with shiny gunk, and there woznt any real evidence of wood, but it might be different next time. Anyhow, with (1200) sandpaper, with care, i dont think that much wood need be lost. Might be different if u cleaned every day. I will have to look for some 1800 grit (or ????). madMac.

Deeman3
03-25-2008, 03:42 PM
Mac,

If the 1200 paper is too coarse, you can rub it against itself, face to face, for a bit and it will become finer. The filling up of the poaper may because of filler in the wood but that fine a paper fills up with residue because of it's so fine anyway.

I can get 3000, 4000 and 5000 grit pretty easy here. I normally use the 3000 and work finer. Almost no wood it removed if you take it very easy. I know most won't tough their shafts with sandpaper but I have had some shafts for 20 years and they are almost original size. I don't do this often.

Caromsoft
03-25-2008, 07:22 PM
I clean my shaft with a damp paper towel when it starts looking dirty followed by a dry towel, however every couple of months I use this...

http://www.tigerproducts.com/store/product.php?productid=16163&cat=0&bestseller

Works great in making my shaft look and play like new.

Majic
03-25-2008, 08:31 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> That sounds pretty good, Majic. So what is dry lubricant, and where do ya get it? </div></div>

Some people I know use Rain-X. RZ-50 made by Dupont is a clear product just to mention a couple. If you decide to experiment with other products just be certain is doesn't dry with a white film. I have another one that I will give out in PM.

eb_in_nc
03-27-2008, 09:17 AM
There's a product on the market called Q-Wiz. It's a double sided pad, the one side for roughing, the other for polishing. It is a high tech micro abrasive that won't burn through the finish and reduce the diameter of the cue. I've been using it for one year and love how it works. I't's also washable and reusable.

http://www.platinumbilliards.com/qwiz-shaft-conditioning-micropro-disc-p-1002070.html

SKennedy
03-27-2008, 09:39 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eb_in_nc</div><div class="ubbcode-body">There's a product on the market called Q-Wiz. It's a double sided pad, the one side for roughing, the other for polishing. It is a high tech micro abrasive that won't burn through the finish and reduce the diameter of the cue. I've been using it for one year and love how it works. I't's also washable and reusable.

http://www.platinumbilliards.com/qwiz-shaft-conditioning-micropro-disc-p-1002070.html </div></div>

I concur that it is a good product. I was thinking about buying one for each of my league teammates this last Christmas as they seem to use mine all the time.

Rich R.
03-28-2008, 07:51 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eb_in_nc</div><div class="ubbcode-body">There's a product on the market called Q-Wiz. It's a double sided pad, the one side for roughing, the other for polishing. It is a high tech micro abrasive that won't burn through the finish and reduce the diameter of the cue. I've been using it for one year and love how it works. I't's also washable and reusable.

http://www.platinumbilliards.com/qwiz-shaft-conditioning-micropro-disc-p-1002070.html </div></div>
I have been using this product for at least the last few years. I have also given them to other players. It is the only abrasive that I use on my cues. It is a great product and I highly recommend it.

Treehumper
03-28-2008, 03:13 PM
your dealing with hard maple. It would take a great deal of rubbing to cause any significant wear. Hard maple is just that. It takes a great deal of abuse without significant wear. The pads are probably a softer fiber than the maple is.

Majic
04-13-2008, 09:09 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Those green nylon pads are abrasive. While you may not see any dust, if you look very closely at your shaft, you will see tiny hairline scratches in the wood.
Steve </div></div>

The green pads will wear down a shaft quickly. I have seen it happen.

SpiderMan
04-14-2008, 08:04 AM
Hey Stretch,

Are you and the Mrs coming to BCA Nationals in 'Vegas? Time to hit a few more buffets, hey?

SpiderMan

striker92s
04-14-2008, 08:39 PM
I haven't tried the "Magic Sponge" yet, but I have used the "scuffy" pads for years. I prefer the white ones since they are less abrasive then the green coarse ones. I only use these sparingly, when someone gets something on my shaft and it needs a little wipe down. for regular cleaning I have always used a damp paper towel and micro fiber sheets from 1500 grit to 5000 grit to bring the shaft and ferrule back to like new condition.

striker92s
04-14-2008, 08:39 PM
I haven't tried the "Magic Sponge" yet, but I have used the "scuffy" pads for years. I prefer the white ones since they are less abrasive then the green coarse ones. I only use these sparingly, when someone gets something on my shaft and it needs a little wipe down. for regular cleaning I have always used a damp paper towel and micro fiber sheets from 1500 grit to 5000 grit to bring the shaft and ferrule back to like new condition.

bluey2king
04-15-2008, 10:46 AM
I tried the Magic Eraser...It works GREAT!!!
I cleaned my cue with a Micro fiber towel whick is a very good cloth, then tried the Magic Eraser It got a lot of chalk. This is on brand new shaft three weeks old!!
Thanks for the tip!!
BTW what is a good shaft slicker??
I used a carnebua (sp) wax. I think that this Magic erser is so good that it will remove the wax.

1Time
05-10-2008, 12:37 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Majic</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The green pads will wear down a shaft quickly. I have seen it happen. </div></div>
No, you saw someone use a green pad that's too abrasive. Some green pads are far too abrasive, rated heavy duty, and others are not. The color of the pad often can't be used to determine the abrasiveness because of different manufacturers or marketing. If the nylon pad is rated lightly abrasive and it is used lightly when cleaning the shaft, it will quickly and effectively clean the shaft for years and without a hint of wear on the shaft.

1Time
05-10-2008, 12:53 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: bluey2king</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
I tried the Magic Eraser...It works GREAT!!! </div></div>
WARNING: Not recommended for bare/polished wood. (read product's packaging)

I used Magic Eraser on two ferrules and rate its effectiveness a 7 out of 10. Not nearly as good as I had hoped, but the ferrules I cleaned were stained with chalk and not all the chalk came off. I'm sure it works better on ferrules that don't stain with chalk. I wet the sponge, quickly pressed much of the water out, and rubbed the ferrule. I don't use Magic Eraser anymore on my cues because I don't like water getting near or on the side of my tip and on my shaft near the ferrule.

Wook
09-29-2009, 07:15 PM
I have a HD with the OS I'd like to use, but it's salvage from a Gateway and the computer I'd like to modify is an old HP. Is it at all possible and if so how? Please keep in mind that I'm not the most technology literate of people, thanks for any help!

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Deeman3
09-30-2009, 03:32 PM
[quote=Wook]I'm not the most technology literate of people, thanks for any help!

<span style="color: #FF0000">I would never have guessed that but am pretty sure you don't know you are asking a bunch of pool bums about how to fix a computer. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif </span>

Cornerman
10-01-2009, 05:24 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
I have a Water Buffalo tip on my "Mace" break cue. I think these are in some way treated. Does anyone know what process is used to make a Water Buffal tip. It is extremely hard leather (I think).
</div></div>Just for clarification, most cue single layered tips are water buffalo. Most layered tips are some sort of swine.

I think you must be talking about a specific tip called Water Buffalo? Maybe a layered water buffalo tip?

The process makes it hard. Elk Master is water buffalo. So is Le Pro.

To your earlier question, soaking a tip in milk breaks it down. Reclamping/vicing the soaked tip can make it harder when it dries. Soaking a tip that's already on the cue stick can't do any hardening by itself. It might actually make it softer.

Fred

Sid_Vicious
10-01-2009, 07:09 PM
Gateway OS/HDDs are married to the firmware in the Gateway motherboard. Gateways are pretty restrictive. At best, you could possibly salvage the disk drive after a format for reuse, but I think you can forget about trying to migrate the GW HD and OS to the HP box. sid


<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Wook</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I have a HD with the OS I'd like to use, but it's salvage from a Gateway and the computer I'd like to modify is an old HP. Is it at all possible and if so how? Please keep in mind that I'm not the most technology literate of people, thanks for any help!

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Chopstick
10-02-2009, 06:22 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Deeman3</div><div class="ubbcode-body">[quote=Wook]I'm not the most technology literate of people, thanks for any help!

<span style="color: #FF0000">I would never have guessed that but am pretty sure you don't know you are asking a bunch of pool bums about how to fix a computer. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif </span>



</div></div>

Yeah, what's that about. If he had asked where the best porn site was he would have gotten an answer.

Sid_Vicious
10-02-2009, 07:35 AM
What's a porn site. sid

Deeman3
10-02-2009, 09:43 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sid_Vicious</div><div class="ubbcode-body">What's a porn site. sid </div></div>

<span style="color: #FF0000"> Don't Sid, it will only make you go blind! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif</span>

KellyStick
10-14-2009, 05:45 PM
Don't get yur stick dirty.

Bob Janzen
12-08-2009, 01:19 PM
Also, for anyone following this thread, there was another thread on this topic started back in 2008 with 56 posts. You can search for it under Search using "How to clean a pool cue" (make sure to use the quotes), and set the search to go back a year.

Mr. Clean Magic Eraser and rubbing alcohol were on the suggestions in that thread, as well.

Bob Janzen
12-09-2009, 03:02 PM
oops, I meant to put that last post in the other topic, but it brought this one back to 'active' status anyways....