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Rival Crown
04-15-2008, 12:58 AM
Hey Guys,

New member here. I've been shooting pool for a while. Not pro. but probably a B or High C player. I just got back into pool again, and my physical skill in it, is much higher than it was several years ago. however, my confidence isn't caught up with it yet. So, when I just started tournaments again, or small time gambling, I shoot horrible. I can't remember any tournaments or leagues where I did so poor. It drives me nuts, because I KNOW am I WAY CAPABLE of doing better, and spanking some of the mates that I've played and lost against. How do I bring out my true stroke? thanks!

sack316
04-15-2008, 01:57 AM
Welcome to the forum and hope you enjoy it!

I'll throw in my two cents here to get things rolling, but there are plenty of others here much more experienced than I, so keep an eye out for the rest of these guy's and gal's inputs.

I've had to step away from the game for a while a few times before, and am currently in a semi-hiatus status, slowly integrating myself back in again. So believe me when I say I understand what you mean about the confidence lacking a bit. Really and truly to me it's just a matter of time and getting that "feel" back as far as playing in high pressure situations. In the mean time, until you do reach your old comfort level again, my suggestion is to just keep your focus on your own game. Don't worry about who you're playing, what you're playing for, etc. just try to simplify things and keep your focus on making your next shot your best shot. When that's done do it again. All you control is what you're doing at that point, so just keep your mindset to the task at hand. Eventually the confidence will take care of itself.

Hmm, re-reading that over again, that's some pretty sound advice for anyone anytime come to think of it. If only I could learn to listen to myself sometimes I'd be a lot better off /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

Welcome again to our humble home here on the CCB!

Sack

BCA Master Instr
04-15-2008, 06:17 AM
I would like to have a look at your game. Then maybe I could offer some ideas on how to improve certain areas.....SPF=randyg

JJFSTAR
04-15-2008, 07:38 AM
Welcome to the board and what a great question. I look forward to several peoples responses.

eb_in_nc
04-15-2008, 07:42 AM
Hi Rival Crown, I am also relatively new to this forum, and within the last 8 months have returned to shooting pool after many years of no activity. Like you, when I came to the APA last August, I was shooting with "0" confidence even though my abilities far exceeded what I was capable of producing. I could just not get over everyone's watchful eyes on my shooting performance and it showed as I was creamed in the first few weeks by people I could have easily beaten had I had the confidence I needed to back up my skills. But with time, I found that I was focusing too much on the process and not enough on playing my own game, which in my mind is the key for you to bring your playing ability to it's fullest. Like Sack said, staying focused and don't worry about your opponent as your true opponent is the table itself.

Today, I have my moments where the game falls apart, just like the rest of us, but for the most part, my game has really smoothed out. And where some people used to feel I was an easy "win" based on my previous poor performances, today they are somewhat more tentative about who they are playing as they know I have the ability, and confidence, to beat them.

Keep at it, you'll get it back..

dg-in-centralpa
04-15-2008, 08:17 AM
Something to think about.... you know you can beat these guys but you may be overconfident. I get that way with some opponents and it happened to me last week. I beat the tougher player and won 1 out of two against the weaker player who I should have crushed. I could barely make a ball. I lost focus. An old saying that is true, play the table not the opponent.

DG - just my opinion

Fran Crimi
04-15-2008, 08:55 AM
Hi Rival Crown. Confidence is a reflection of your self-image. It comes from believing in yourself. The fact that you're mentioning that you're coming off a layoff from the game --- it's pretty clear that it's weighing on your mind when you compete.

I believe that each of us is different when it comes to figuring out how to build our confidence because we all have different self-images. In teaching players, I have found that some need to practice for endless hours in order to gain the smallest amount of confidence, while others believe in themselves even if they lose game after game.

There is no easy answer, which is why so many professional athletes consult sports psychologists, because it's hard to try to figure ourselves out. However, if you want to give it a try, I would recommend going to a bookstore and buying books on the mental game of a variety of sports. You may find something that works for you in one of those books. I have found those types of books to be helpful to me at various times.

Fran

Eric.
04-15-2008, 09:33 AM
Just my personal contribution...

I find that knowing how to pocket a ball vs shooting by pure feel, gives me confidence. At that point, you can focus more on delivering the cb to that spot and speed control, etc. Thats not to say that having a consistant aiming system will be the only solution, just that aiming will be one less thing to worry about.

FWIW.


Eric

BigRigTom
04-15-2008, 09:48 AM
Confidence comes from believing that you have the ability to perform and KNOWING that you will use that ability and perform. You must both believe you can and know you will to achieve confidence.

Saying you do is not enough, you must truly believe it.

The odd thing is that it does not necessarily have to be true as long as you believe it to be true.
I have seen many matches, especially in the APA where the lesser skilled player wins because they are brimming with confidence in their ability to perform even though as I watch them I wonder what they have to be confident about because half of the shots they just made were more luck than skill. I have been beaten by those very people who believe in their ability to the extent that they shoot way over their head.

Playing the table and ignoring your opponent will get you in some pretty deep trouble in the APA. The handicap system (while not perfect) gives everyone a chance at beating anyone. You simply can not play the same game against all skill levels and expect to win. You have to consider your opponents abilities and confidence level to decide how aggressive to play and when to play safe instead of just looking at the table and going for it.

"Just play the table" is way over simplified in my opinion.

eb_in_nc
04-15-2008, 11:57 AM
I believe the phrase "playing the table" is being taken out of context. In a perfect world, if you never allowed your opponent to come to the table, then the table is your only opponent. Reality dictates that is pretty much never the case, so you have to imply strategy in your shooting along with your own skills. "Playing the table" is a mind set to get yourself in the zone, and to stay on the table as to never give your opponent that one chance. It also means that you as a player need to adapt your game to your ability based on the surroundings, who you are playing at that particular moment, and what skills they possess (should you play the offensive versus the defensive shot). It does not infer that your human opponent does not exist, and that you should not take their abilities into how you play the table. If we ignore this part of the game, then as BigRigTom say's we will get into some deep trouble with our game.

Learning how to manage all the facets of the game including the mental side of it will only bring us the confidence we need to play the game to the fullest of our abilities.

Deeman3
04-15-2008, 01:00 PM
A good confidence builder, if, like you say, you are playing on bar tables in league is to go play on a tight nine footer for a while. Short the harder position play on the small table, you should see much easier shotmaking on the little table when you return. Otherwise, it's still mostly about hitting a lot of balls properly to build confidence.

Rival Crown
04-15-2008, 06:35 PM
OMG, all your guys are FANTASTIC. I just posted yesterday, but there's already a ton of great responses.

I shoot on 9ft tables, so if I do play on a bar table, it's like taking candy from a baby.

I agree absolutely with the self-image thing, and i"m studying a lot of psych books to get it handled. RIght now, I'm struggling with an image of myself, "CHOKING" when it counts. I remember, doing well in an 8ball tournament, and just killing it, and then my uncle, who's a local pool gambler himself, came by to watch me...then I CHOKED the easiest shot, because I wanted to impress him.

"Play the table." I used to shoot regularly with this 'A' player in san diego. He was real friendly, and open to teaching me aspects of the game. I asked him one time," what do ya do to get rid of the hibbyjibbies, the nerves, shakes, nervousness?" he simply replied," Don't play against me... play the table."
I guess I need to remind myself that point when in competing.

and to the BCA instructor, I will work on recording my game and putting it online for review. I must warn you though, I excelled with a crooked form, because no one taught me when I first got started off. So, my arm, looks like a chicken wing to me. but I can definitely stroke that ball. Thanks again guys, keep it coming.

Bambu
04-16-2008, 09:08 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rival Crown</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hey Guys,

New member here. I've been shooting pool for a while. Not pro. but probably a B or High C player. I just got back into pool again, and my physical skill in it, is much higher than it was several years ago. however, my confidence isn't caught up with it yet. So, when I just started tournaments again, or small time gambling, I shoot horrible. I can't remember any tournaments or leagues where I did so poor. It drives me nuts, because I KNOW am I WAY CAPABLE of doing better, and spanking some of the mates that I've played and lost against. How do I bring out my true stroke? thanks!</div></div>

I think that in pool there is a build up of pressure with every shot made, and every miss. Once you put a stop to that, its always a good thing. Dont pat yourself on the back for the good shots, and dont beat yourself up on the bad. Shoot every shot like its just a shot, no more, no less. But, give every shot 100% attention. And no matter what happens, dont get pissed off. That just makes things worse and worse.

CarolNYC
04-16-2008, 09:23 AM
Hi Rival,
You stated you "just got back into playing"-is this league-9-ball,14.1,8-ball?
You must go into your match as a warrior-stay in the moment-thats very important-take ONE shot at a time and dont rush-keep your game simple-and most importantly, BREATHE-if you know how to breathe through your stomach, it relaxes all of your muscles -just like babie breathe(in the nose,out the mouth)Once your relaxed, your stroke will come:)

Good luck!
Carol

JJFSTAR
04-16-2008, 10:13 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rival Crown</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> RIght now, I'm struggling with an image of myself, "CHOKING" when it counts. I remember, doing well in an 8ball tournament, and just killing it, and then my uncle, who's a local pool gambler himself, came by to watch me...then I CHOKED the easiest shot, because I wanted to impress him.</div></div>

I found Mr. Pages video's to be helpful really all of them not just this one but this particular video speaks directly to the problem above. Good luck and this is a great post lots of nice stuff.

http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/normal_videos/new/NVB-5.htm

bsmutz
04-16-2008, 10:30 AM
Actually, that would be Dr. Dave's videos (not quite sure where you got Mr. Page). It's just like any other area of your life. The ultimate goal is to become the observer, watching what's happening without attachment.

eb_in_nc
04-16-2008, 10:40 AM
If you open up the link, it says Mike Page's pre shot routine, so this is where he got Mr. Page!!!

Scott Lee
04-16-2008, 11:59 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rival Crown</div><div class="ubbcode-body">"Play the table." I used to shoot regularly with this 'A' player in san diego. He was real friendly, and open to teaching me aspects of the game. I asked him one time," what do ya do to get rid of the hibbyjibbies, the nerves, shakes, nervousness?" he simply replied," Don't play against me... play the table."
I guess I need to remind myself that point when in competing.

and to the BCA instructor, I will work on recording my game and putting it online for review. I must warn you though, I excelled with a crooked form, because no one taught me when I first got started off. So, my arm, looks like a chicken wing to me. but I can definitely stroke that ball. Thanks again guys, keep it coming. </div></div>

Rival Crown..."Play the table" is very solid advice. The "BCA instructor" you're referring to (Randyg), is frequently regarded as the top instructor in the country, by his peers. Sometimes we choose to try to "fix" a flaw like your 'chicken wing', and sometimes not. It depends on whether it interferes with your ability to accurately and repeatably set up and deliver the cuestick in a straight line.

Scott Lee

1Time
04-27-2008, 09:18 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rival Crown</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hey Guys,

New member here. I've been shooting pool for a while. Not pro. but probably a B or High C player. I just got back into pool again, and my physical skill in it, is much higher than it was several years ago. however, my confidence isn't caught up with it yet. So, when I just started tournaments again, or small time gambling, I shoot horrible. I can't remember any tournaments or leagues where I did so poor. It drives me nuts, because I KNOW am I WAY CAPABLE of doing better, and spanking some of the mates that I've played and lost against. How do I bring out my true stroke? thanks! </div></div>

Confidence comes from shooting better pool, and your best bet for doing so will come from quality pool instruction. Try an instructor. Try different instructors. Ask better pool players. Watch and immitate better pool players.

And if you'd rather raise your level of play sooner than later, light a fire under yourself. That is, impose some real rewards and punishments that are dependent on your development over time.

JoeW
04-28-2008, 08:41 AM
Self confidence is an emotional reaction to a particular situation. I do not think it means that one will win. It means that one is not concerned with the reactions (or thoughts) of other people or of one's self.

In a night club you watch a couple dancing. They do not dance all that well but they are enjoying themselves – they are confident. The couple is having fun and they are not paying attention to their own behavior or the reactions of other people. When people dance like this they are fun to watch because we all know that they are enjoying themselves.

When we stop judging our own efforts and simply have fun, then we play our best. This may or may not win the game but we are less likely to make those silly mistakes that are embarrassing. When one is not concerned about looking incompetent then one often does not look incompetent. When a mistake is made the mistake is ignored and it is of little consequence to the player or to those watching.

Professional musicians often stumble during a performance. They ignore the gaff and continue with their performance. Often times they simply add a note or two to give the music continuity. In a sense, self confidence is about not judging one's performance because no matter what happens the performance will be acceptable.

In my thinking the way to be more self confident is to accept one's current ability as the best that can be done. You know you can play better under other circumstances and with more practice but for now it is about enjoying one's self.

Watching a good player play 8-Ball you will often see them take the “back up” position and continue as if that were the position they played. If they miss they shrug and wait for the next opportunity. These are the players it is fun to watch and we often make excuses for them because we like their style of play. To regain one's self confidence, enjoy the experience and you and everyone else will be on your side.

The AA community has a useful idea here -- Fake it till you make it.

Qtec
04-28-2008, 09:23 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">n a night club you watch a couple dancing. They do not dance all that well but they are enjoying themselves – they are confident. </div></div>

Or they have had a few drinks [ or have some other artificial stimulant in their body] or they just don't care what others think or they actually think they are good dancers etc etc?

Surely self-confidence and self-consciousness are two entirely different things?
Self-confidence is how YOU see yourself.
Self- consciousness is how OTHERS see you.


<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Watching a good player play 8-Ball you will often see them take the “back up” position and continue as if that were the position they played. </div></div>

You always [ if you can ] play for positions that give you options. eg, you play for ball A but if you come short or long you have another ball. ie, You play for an area rather than an exact spot. Its a basic rule in Pool and Snooker.
Anyway, isn't it just your opinion that they <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> continue as if that were the position they played.</div></div> or do you know that for a fact?
Maybe you didn't/couldn't see the shot?

Qtec

1Time
04-28-2008, 09:56 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Self confidence is an emotional reaction to a particular situation. I do not think it means that one will win. It means that one is not concerned with the reactions (or thoughts) of other people or of one's self. </div></div>
I agree. Confidence "can" come without improvement and be independent of performance. I've noticed drinking alcohol seems to help. I also think of confidence as a learned state of mind. However, with respect to the OP's desire to develop confidence AND shooting pool better, confidence should and will come from doing so. The best first place for that is with instruction and practice.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The AA community has a useful idea here -- Fake it till you make it. </div></div>
The more specific and applicable idea with respect to improving is to learn from your missed shots. Confidence without competence is a pool shooting fool.

Qtec
04-28-2008, 10:00 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Self confidence is an emotional reaction to a particular situation. </div></div>

I disagree. Self confidence is an emotional reaction independent/despite of the circumstances.
Q

1Time
04-28-2008, 10:14 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Self confidence is an emotional reaction to a particular situation. </div></div>

I disagree. Self confidence is an emotional reaction independent/despite of the circumstances.
Q </div></div>

I think JoeW is referring to the fight or flight response before the decision has been made. And you are referring to this after the decision has been made.

JoeW
04-28-2008, 11:00 AM
If you attended a physics seminar and were asked about those things you learned in the freshman class, you would probably stumble around and feel foolish, assuming that you are not a physicist. However, if you know your limits then you can honestly answer, I should know that but have not used that information often enough to remember how it all goes together. You would be self confident in your ability but ignorant in its application.

Self confidence is knowing one’s ability and accepting that ability. I agree that poor players with much self confidence do not make many balls and if too confident of a non-existent ability look foolish. However, the self confident but poor player who knows his abilities can, and often does, play up to his limited ability and this may or not be sufficient to win the day.

Lack of confidence in our ability usually leads to poor performance unless we have learned other ways to compensate. Adequate confidence in our ability may not win but allows us to play up to our potential.

Self confidence as a trait is something that is learned over time. There are actors (and others) with little self confidence. They require an entourage of admirers and vomit before each performance anyway. For some the lack of confidence contributes to their performance, comedians are well known for this disability. For others a lack of self confidence brings on an adrenalin rush that contributes to exceptional performance but is physically costly.

The optimum is to know and accept your limits.

I suspect that we use the term “self conscious” to refer to a person who is too sensitive to their own performance and especially their lack of ability. Hence, the self conscious girl at a dance seems unsure, has her head bowed and is hesitant in her conversation. We think she is too self conscious of her lack of ability. This is another way of saying that she has no self confidence.

There are many beautiful women who do not photograph well. I think this is because their beauty is in the way they self confidently use what they have. Their total personality contributes to a beauty beyond compare. These women are self confident in who they are and how they contribute to those around them.

eb_in_nc
04-28-2008, 11:31 AM
Confidence should be based on observed reality. It should be based on the achievement of performance goals. You should be confident that you will perform up to your current abilities.

Good self-confidence comes from a realistic expectation of success based on well practiced physical skills, a good knowledge of the sport, respect for your own competence, adequate preparation, and good physical condition. The success attained should be measured in terms of achievement of personal performance goals, not achievement goals such as winning. You can still be self confident and lose a match.

Self-confidence is arguably one of the most important things you can have. Self-confidence reflects your assessment of your own self-worth.

Overconfidence however is dangerous - it can lead you into situations which you do not have the ability to get out of. It can set you up for serious failure that can devastate the self-confidence you should have. Overconfidence is misplaced confidence that is not based on ability. It may be a result of vanity or ego, or may be caused by positive thinking or imagery which is not backed up by ability.

These are a few excerpts from Mind Tools.

wolfdancer
04-28-2008, 11:37 AM
JoeW, hope that you remain a member here (and not yield to the dark side lure of AZB)..
While I skipped school the day they taught Psychology...your posts read quite well to me....
AN...i even learned something today...always wondered why i look so bad in a photograph....does that work the same for mirrors as well??

JoeW
04-28-2008, 11:51 AM
Yeah it works with mirrors too. And of course you realize that all world class beauties have a flaw and this too is what makes them so interesting! The rest of us are just down right ugly, but I speak only for myself.

Vapros
04-28-2008, 02:17 PM
Q-Tip, self-consciousness is not the way others see you. It's the way you believe they may see you.

1Time
04-28-2008, 02:31 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">If you attended a physics seminar and were asked about those things you learned in the freshman class, you would probably stumble around and feel foolish, assuming that you are not a physicist. However, if you know your limits then you can honestly answer, I should know that but have not used that information often enough to remember how it all goes together. You would be self confident in your ability but ignorant in its application.</div></div>
And here's my interpretation of this example as it pertains to the OP. Confidence without competence is a pool shooting fool.
&gt;
&gt;
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JowW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Self confidence is knowing one’s ability and accepting that ability. </div></div>
No. One need not "know" their ability, but rather accept their perception of it (big difference), and that's what can lead to self confidence.
&gt;
&gt;
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I agree that poor players with much self confidence do not make many balls and if too confident of a non-existent ability look foolish. However, the self confident but poor player who knows his abilities can, and often does, play up to his limited ability and this may or not be sufficient to win the day.</div></div>
What about the OP's concerns? He's frustrated with his current playing level and that has caused a drop in confidence.
&gt;
&gt;
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Lack of confidence in our ability usually leads to poor performance unless we have learned other ways to compensate. Adequate confidence in our ability may not win but allows us to play up to our potential.</div></div>
Again, what about the OP's concerns? The OP's performance is below his expectations and that has led to a drop in confidence.
&gt;
&gt;
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Self confidence as a trait is something that is learned over time. There are actors (and others) with little self confidence. They require an entourage of admirers and vomit before each performance anyway. For some the lack of confidence contributes to their performance, comedians are well known for this disability. For others a lack of self confidence brings on an adrenalin rush that contributes to exceptional performance but is physically costly.</div></div>
I don't see what this has to do with the OP's concerns. He's not an actor. Is this somehow supposed to help him become more confident in his pool game? Surely since he's interested in shooting better pool, he should do something to improve his pool game. Right? Or, are you suggesting he "fake it till he makes it", and in effect artificially boost his confidence which in turn will help him improve his game?
&gt;
&gt;
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The optimum is to know and accept your limits.</div></div>
In and of itself, without elaboration, this advice seems useless for the OP.
&gt;
&gt;
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I suspect that we use the term “self conscious” to refer to a person who is too sensitive to their own performance and especially their lack of ability. Hence, the self conscious girl at a dance seems unsure, has her head bowed and is hesitant in her conversation. We think she is too self conscious of her lack of ability. This is another way of saying that she has no self confidence.

There are many beautiful women who do not photograph well. I think this is because their beauty is in the way they self confidently use what they have. Their total personality contributes to a beauty beyond compare. These women are self confident in who they are and how they contribute to those around them.</div></div>
In re-reading the OP's first post, I found nothing to indicate a problem with being self conscious. How were your comments in these two paragraphs intended to help the OP?

1Time
04-28-2008, 02:39 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eb_in_nc</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Confidence should be based on observed reality. It should be based on the achievement of performance goals. You should be confident that you will perform up to your current abilities.

Good self-confidence comes from a realistic expectation of success based on well practiced physical skills, a good knowledge of the sport, respect for your own competence, adequate preparation, and good physical condition. The success attained should be measured in terms of achievement of personal performance goals, not achievement goals such as winning. You can still be self confident and lose a match.

Self-confidence is arguably one of the most important things you can have. Self-confidence reflects your assessment of your own self-worth.

Overconfidence however is dangerous - it can lead you into situations which you do not have the ability to get out of. It can set you up for serious failure that can devastate the self-confidence you should have. Overconfidence is misplaced confidence that is not based on ability. It may be a result of vanity or ego, or may be caused by positive thinking or imagery which is not backed up by ability.

These are a few excerpts from Mind Tools. </div></div>
OK, so is there any chance you could offer your application of this as it pertains to the OP's concerns?

eb_in_nc
04-28-2008, 02:57 PM
1Time, it's up to the OP to take what he can and make it work for him, or not. He message indicates that his capability to play is better than what he has demonstrated in league play, probably due to his confidence not being where it is when he is in a casual play mode. I have nothing else to go by and he makes no mention of other issues he might be facing like shot accuracy.

My bullets about self-confidence were only meant to be somewhat a guideline of sort, not necessarily a black and white understanding about what to do and not to do. It's similar to a road map and driving, you can take another route and still get to your destination by making deviations.

Qtec
04-28-2008, 06:24 PM
Now you are talking about semantics.

My statement still stands.
I posed some direct Qs for Joe and he made 2 posts and ignored my Qs.

Doesn't that say something?


Q

JoeW
04-29-2008, 05:29 AM
For the record, I only respond to polite meaningful discussions. Have a nice day.

1Time
04-29-2008, 01:36 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eb_in_nc</div><div class="ubbcode-body">1Time, it's up to the OP to take what he can and make it work for him, or not. He message indicates that his capability to play is better than what he has demonstrated in league play, probably due to his confidence not being where it is when he is in a casual play mode. I have nothing else to go by and he makes no mention of other issues he might be facing like shot accuracy.</div></div>
Yes, of course.
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eb_in_nc</div><div class="ubbcode-body">My bullets about self-confidence were only meant to be somewhat a guideline of sort, not necessarily a black and white understanding about what to do and not to do. It's similar to a road map and driving, you can take another route and still get to your destination by making deviations. </div></div>
Oh, I see. Hopefully he will find that helpful.

1Time
04-29-2008, 04:35 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">For the record, I only respond to polite meaningful discussions. Have a nice day.
</div></div>
That's nothing but veiled cop-out for the typical puff-piece posts you make.

wolfdancer
04-29-2008, 08:25 PM
Seems like the cynicism that's so prevalent on the NPR, is also getting to be the norm here.
I find Joe's posts interesting, but understand others may not....

1Time
04-29-2008, 08:55 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Seems like the cynicism that's so prevalent on the NPR, is also getting to be the norm here.
I find Joe's posts interesting, but understand others may not....
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Yes, definitely interesting, and I look forward to reading more of JoeW's posts.

So wolfdancer, anything to add regarding the OP's concerns?

wolfdancer
04-29-2008, 10:19 PM
I was replying to your insulting (imo) reply to Joe, and not the OP. But if I wanted to reply to the OP...I don't need your prompt to direct me.
Are you now policing the threads and deciding which comments are relevant? In regards to the original post...yours were about as irrelevant as mine....so consider that when you decide you are in charge of protocol here
For the record, I think Joe has much to add to the pool discussions given his field of expertise, and my interests in the mental side of sports.....and if you don't agree with that, or don't like his "powder puff" posts, or whatever you called them...well, golly!!!
I've seen too many good , knowledgeable, people on this pool side run off here, because someone challenges their every post, adding a few , what they mistakenly believe to be, bon mots, for good measure...

1Time
04-30-2008, 01:42 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I was replying to your insulting (imo) reply to Joe, and not the OP. But if I wanted to reply to the OP...I don't need your prompt to direct me.</div></div>
Yes, but I also asked because I wanted to know your opinion, just like I posted about wanting JoeW's opinions. Is it that hard to believe I would want to know your opinion with respect to the purpose of this thread?

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Are you now policing the threads and deciding which comments are relevant? </div></div>
And wouldn't that be beneficial... if only I had the time.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">In regards to the original post...yours were about as irrelevant as mine....so consider that when you decide you are in charge of protocol here</div></div>
So what's your point? It's not a crime to post off topic and neither is it to request relevant comments. You're tripping.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">For the record, I think Joe has much to add to the pool discussions given his field of expertise, and my interests in the mental side of sports.....</div></div>
And so do I.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">and if you don't agree with that, or don't like his "powder puff" posts, or whatever you called them...well, golly!!!</div></div>
Uh, get over it. I'm just telling it like it is.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I've seen too many good , knowledgeable, people on this pool side run off here, because someone challenges their every post, adding a few , what they mistakenly believe to be, bon mots, for good measure... </div></div>
I don't know what you mean by "bon mots". But you do seem genuinely concerned about this board's well being. So am I. Maybe you could help police the board by reporting inappropriate posts to the moderator.

eb_in_nc
04-30-2008, 06:32 AM
iTime, I see your and old hand here and I'm a newbie, so what..
You and your concern for the OP, who cares, it seems it's the only thing you seek in your dim witted retorts. Sure, staying on the topic of discussion is somewhat meaningful, but I've not read one thread here where people are getting off the beaten path putting their two cents in, again, so what. If it's such an issue of concern for you, write your own topic and ask people to only response with you in mind, otherwise we will say nothing to you. Seems this would make you happy for certain.

As far as JoeW goes and your sideways blast to him, It's obvious he doesn;t need to get down to your level of contentiousness so he'd rather stay silent (I on the other hand have no issue being contentious with the likes of you). As far as posts are concerned, I'd rather read his intelligent points of view then to see your meaningless blabber any day of the week. But again, I'm a newbie, so what do I know.

If you think your retort is "telling it like it is", then you are certainly living in your own little world of things.

1Time
04-30-2008, 10:04 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eb_in_nc</div><div class="ubbcode-body">iTime, I see your and old hand here and I'm a newbie, so what..</div></div>
I agree. Makes no difference.
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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eb_in_nc</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You and your concern for the OP, who cares, it seems it's the only thing you seek in your dim witted retorts. Sure, staying on the topic of discussion is somewhat meaningful, but I've not read one thread here where people are getting off the beaten path putting their two cents in, again, so what. If it's such an issue of concern for you, write your own topic and ask people to only response with you in mind, otherwise we will say nothing to you. Seems this would make you happy for certain.</div></div>
Like I just posted above in response to wolfdancer's similar complaint AND of me posting off topic, "It's not a crime to post off topic and neither is it to request relevant comments. You're tripping."
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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eb_in_nc</div><div class="ubbcode-body">As far as JoeW goes and your sideways blast to him, It's obvious he doesn;t need to get down to your level of contentiousness so he'd rather stay silent (I on the other hand have no issue being contentious with the likes of you). As far as posts are concerned, I'd rather read his intelligent points of view then to see your meaningless blabber any day of the week. But again, I'm a newbie, so what do I know.</div></div>
Excellent! But no need to bill yourself short just cause you're new here. I look forward to reading your comments and responding.
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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eb_in_nc</div><div class="ubbcode-body">If you think your retort is "telling it like it is", then you are certainly living in your own little world of things. </div></div>You go right ahead and tell it like it is, eb_in_nc. Glad you're here.