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mlfield
05-18-2008, 07:29 PM
I have a Predator cue with the 314-2 shaft. I used Predator's suggestion on the cleaning and maintenance but I just can't seem to get it to burnish well after cleaning. This is my cleaning routine: Use alcohol on a white terrycloth towel to remove chalk and most dirt. Then I use 2000 grit sandpaper and finish with leather to try and seal and burnish the wood. But the leather doesn't really do the trick. It's not "slick" at all and it's not long before it needs cleaning again. Any tips or ideas? Thanks in advance, Mike

1Time
05-18-2008, 11:17 PM
If there's no polish on the shaft, here's what I'd do to make it really slick. Clean it. Burnish it with a leather slicker. Clean it. Polish it.

The shaft on my Blaze cue is polished from the factory. I keep it clean and smooth by slicking it with a dry 65% cotton / 35% polyester blend polo shirt. The shaft on my Players cue is not polished. I keep it clean and smooth by lightly slicking it with a mildly abrasive nylon cleaning pad.

I burnish the edge of the tips I install on my cues with a dollar bill folded in two length-wise.

Billy_Bob
05-19-2008, 05:43 AM
Use leather. Best place to buy leather is at a 2nd hand store. Buy an old purse or something made of natural (not dyed) leather. Then take it home and cut up square pieces about 5 inches by 5 inches.

I avoid using anything abrasive like sandpaper unless absolutely necessary (like once every 6 months). If you use this everyday, it will reduce the size of your shaft to nothing.

1Time
05-19-2008, 06:40 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Billy_Bob</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I avoid using anything abrasive like sandpaper unless absolutely necessary (like once every 6 months). If you use this everyday, it will reduce the size of your shaft to nothing. </div></div>
Many abrasives definitely should be avoided because they are too rough and can leave scratches and remove wood.

However, a mild enough abrasive like some nylon pads or a cotton/polyester blend material that's used lightly for a few seconds on the wood of the shaft will clean and slick it without any problems at all, even if used like this for many years.

eb_in_nc
05-19-2008, 07:50 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: mlfield</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I have a Predator cue with the 314-2 shaft. I used Predator's suggestion on the cleaning and maintenance but I just can't seem to get it to burnish well after cleaning. This is my cleaning routine: Use alcohol on a white terrycloth towel to remove chalk and most dirt. Then I use 2000 grit sandpaper and finish with leather to try and seal and burnish the wood. But the leather doesn't really do the trick. It's not "slick" at all and it's not long before it needs cleaning again. Any tips or ideas? Thanks in advance, Mike </div></div>

There's a product called Q-wiz that is a double sided micro abrasive pad. One side for cleaning, the other for polishing.

It works great and does not reduce the diameter of the shaft, and can be washed and reused.

http://www.platinumbilliards.com/qwiz-shaft-conditioning-micropro-disc-p-1002070.html

KellyStick
05-19-2008, 11:21 AM
I have a Jensen Cue Made locally by Mike Johnson. I rarely do much but take a cotton cloth and rub hard to heat up the shaft. When Mike does a tune up which usually is when I need a new tip he put some sort of wax on the shaft as it turns in the lathe. I guess he burnishes this in so to speak as it rotates. It puts a very smooth slippery polish on the shaft. I like it. Not sure what the wax is. Doesn't look soft like a candle tho.

SpiderMan
05-19-2008, 04:11 PM
I use pure carnauba wax. This is very hard, but with a fairly low melting point. Hold the block of wax against the shaft while spinning in the lathe. This puts on a small amount of wax. Then burnish at high speed using a paper towel and moderate pressure, which melts the wax into the pores and polishes it to a glass-like finish. You should feel the surface getting hot, through the paper.

SpiderMan

1Time
05-19-2008, 06:10 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: SpiderMan</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I use pure carnauba wax. This is very hard, but with a fairly low melting point. Hold the block of wax against the shaft while spinning in the lathe. This puts on a small amount of wax. Then burnish at high speed using a paper towel and moderate pressure, which melts the wax into the pores and polishes it to a glass-like finish. You should feel the surface getting hot, through the paper.

SpiderMan </div></div>

Sounds good to me. Should 1, 2, or 4 thicknesses of paper towel be used, or does it not matter? Thanks

SpiderMan
05-20-2008, 09:40 AM
Take about half a sheet of paper towel, fold it up until you have four thicknesses. Then fold it around the spinning shaft so that you can squeeze to control the pressure (and heat). Go light with the pressure at first, or the waxy surface will try to "grab" the paper out of your hand. More pressure and heat as the surface takes a polish.

NOTE - Be VERY careful with the heat and pressure when you have a softer thermoplastic ferrule such as found on older Meuccis. You can actually melt/groove the ferrule surface with friction from the paper!

SpiderMan

Paul_Mon
05-29-2008, 05:12 AM
I also have Predator shafts. The following is a copy/paste from a thread I recently posted at AZ.

First of all I try to wipe down the shaft after each session with the same damp cloth I just washed my hands with. On the few occasions that I clean the shaft, usually after installing a new tip. I do the following:

1. wipe down the shaft with Mr Clean Magic Eraser, dampened with denatured alcohol.

2. Wipe down the shaft with a paper towel dampened in denatured alcohol.

3. burnish the shaft with a piece of leather, place a piece of waxed paper inside the leather, burnish till you feel some heat.

4. wet the side of the tip with saliva and burnish (without the waxed paper) till shiny.

This is all you should need. I do have some 3M burnishing films that I've used on scratched ferrules. They come in different grits (colors). I use the pink, I think they are about 2000 grit.

Paul Mon