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View Full Version : Help Choosing a 14 mm Layered Tip



1Time
06-02-2008, 04:20 PM
Soon I would like order a layered tip online that is 14 mm in diameter with sides that are parallel to each other. What I am trying to avoid is buying a 14 mm layered tip that leans to one side, which after trimming will reduce it to less than 14 mm. I would have already ordered a Talisman WB but the last 2 Talisman Pro tips I received leaned to one side. So I've concluded there's little chance of me getting a straight Talisman WB.

Which of the following layered 14 mm tips do you think would be least likely to lean to one side? Thanks

Molavia
Everest
Sniper
Kamui

SpiderMan
06-03-2008, 08:17 AM
Abuot 7 or 8 years ago, I participated in the Talisman development trials, and provided feedback when I encountered this exact problem. I found that many of the flat-topped Talisman tips were slanted, making it difficult or impossible to center and trim them on larger-diameter shafts.

The problem seemed to be cured when Tony introduced the pre-crowned Talisman tips. Is this not still the case? I no longer use or recommend Talismans because of the layer-breakdown issues that were so prevalent a couple years back, so I wasn't aware of the slant problem resurfacing.

I can definitely say that I've never seen a "crooked" Moori in many years of installations, so that one should be on your short list. Moori is hands-down the highest and most consistent build quality over the years, and you almost can't go wrong in choosing them.

Another tip you listed, for which I have moderate commentary, is the Sniper. They seem to be adequately straight-sided, but be aware that they are quite soft compared to any Talisman. Snipers will therefore feel nothing like what you are accustomed to. You must also be very careful in the trimming of Snipers, as they do not readily withstand mechanical abuse, and may be damaged in the lathe more easily than most layered tips.

SpiderMan

1Time
06-03-2008, 02:16 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: SpiderMan</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Abuot 7 or 8 years ago, I participated in the Talisman development trials, and provided feedback when I encountered this exact problem. I found that many of the flat-topped Talisman tips were slanted, making it difficult or impossible to center and trim them on larger-diameter shafts.

The problem seemed to be cured when Tony introduced the pre-crowned Talisman tips. Is this not still the case? I no longer use or recommend Talismans because of the layer-breakdown issues that were so prevalent a couple years back, so I wasn't aware of the slant problem resurfacing.</div></div>
I am fairly new at installing my own tips, but after doing about 8 of them I am satisfied with my techniques and results. I use a utility knife, fingernail file, 80 and 400 grit sandpaper, and a Willards. I recently bought 1 domed Talisman Pro medium from Seyberts and it leaned so much it looked like I would get less than 13 mm after trimming. Seyberts hand picked and sent me a free replacement after telling them the problem I had with the first one, but the second one still leaned. I trimmed the first to 12.5 to 12.75 mm and the second to 12.75 to 13 mm.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: SpiderMan</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I can definitely say that I've never seen a "crooked" Moori in many years of installations, so that one should be on your short list. Moori is hands-down the highest and most consistent build quality over the years, and you almost can't go wrong in choosing them.</div></div>
That's good to know. I can hand pick Moori tips locally. But I have choosen not to use one because of my past experience with a medium. It was very good with follow, but not up to my expectations with drawing. And the tip I'm selecting here is for use on a bar box where I want to be able to move the heavier cue ball around better, particularly with drawing.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: SpiderMan</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Another tip you listed, for which I have moderate commentary, is the Sniper. They seem to be adequately straight-sided, but be aware that they are quite soft compared to any Talisman. Snipers will therefore feel nothing like what you are accustomed to. You must also be very careful in the trimming of Snipers, as they do not readily withstand mechanical abuse, and may be damaged in the lathe more easily than most layered tips.</div></div>
I suspect I would have no problem installing a Sniper tip by hand, and I base that on my experience with installing two Talisman tips, which showed no problems during and after installation. From what I've been reading online, the problems with installing Talismans and Snipers seems to be mainly associated with using a lathe.

I do have a preference for how a tip feels when shooting, which is slightly harder than a Talsiman Pro. However, I am easily willing to sacrifice that for performance: 95% performance, 5% feel, sound, and risk of damaging the tip during installation. And the performance I am looking for is primarily being able to draw a regular (heavier) bar box cue ball better, as in up to and including a power draw. So if the Sniper promises to be is a straight-sided 14 mm, I would still consider it. I am now also considering a hard Tiger layered tip. But if these three Tiger tips don't seem like they will be straight sided, I may go with a Molavia or Kamui. Thanks

SpiderMan
06-04-2008, 11:46 AM
Draw is much, much, more about technique than tip. But, if you are having problems drawing (by problems I mean it seems harder for you than for some other players using the same CB), a softer tip is definitely more forgiving of a less-than-perfect cue delivery.

In that case, the Sniper may be a good one for you to try. Don't be against trying something and then cutting it off if it doesn't suit you.

SpiderMan

mbpool
06-04-2008, 08:37 PM
i have used the tiger medium layered tip for 2 years. very good tip.

Scott Lee
06-04-2008, 09:44 PM
Thank you Marty! It never fails to amaze me how this myth sticks around year after year (myth: this tip draws better than that tip). Any kind of spin on the CB is more about stroke quality than anything else!

BTW, I hope you've completely healed up from your little "accident" last year! I missed seeing you in Vegas at the BCA! I didn't see SPetty either. Was she there?

Scott Lee

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: SpiderMan</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Draw is much, much, more about technique than tip. But, if you are having problems drawing (by problems I mean it seems harder for you than for some other players using the same CB), a softer tip is definitely more forgiving of a less-than-perfect cue delivery.

SpiderMan </div></div>

SpiderMan
06-05-2008, 02:57 PM
She elected not to make the trip this year, maybe too much going on with their move and all. So, since I wouldn't have a Scotch doubles partner, I didn't enter singles either because I decided to limit the amount of vacation time used. I did see you at your class in one of the side rooms. I was just passing by, adn didn't have time to stop in.

SpiderMan

georgiekuntz
06-10-2008, 01:07 PM
I have the solution to your problem. Going up to 14mm is the wrong thing to do. Have your shaft sanded down on a lathe so it fits a 11.5mm tip. Your English, the power of your draw, will increase dramatically. Ask Allen McCarty, he will tell you the same thing.