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ShooHead
06-09-2008, 04:29 PM
Hey /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

Since this is my first post, let me begin by saying that I am 16 years old, and have been living in NC my whole life. I've been playing pool a little forever, but lately ( pass 3-4 months ), I've been in a serious training phase. Pool IS my life, my job, and my therapy /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif And that's all for that...

I've been searching for a new cue, and I can go up to $300. I would like it to be 18oz, have a 12mm shaft, wood-to-wood joint, and a triangle tip. I don't care about wraps too much, it could either have, or not have one.

This is the cue I have been looking at- http://billiardwarehouse.com/cues/mcdermott/mcderm_m4-3b.htm

The only problem is that nobody I have talked to, has seemed to know anything about it, as far as playability, etc... Is there anybody on here that could share any information on it?

I'm open to all suggestions, but I'd prefer sticking to the McD line,
All help appreciated,
Shoo.

Rich R.
06-09-2008, 07:18 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ShooHead</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hey /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

Since this is my first post, let me begin by saying that I am 16 years old, and have been living in NC my whole life. I've been playing pool a little forever, but lately ( pass 3-4 months ), I've been in a serious training phase. Pool IS my life, my job, and my therapy /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif And that's all for that...

I've been searching for a new cue, and I can go up to $300. I would like it to be 18oz, have a 12mm shaft, wood-to-wood joint, and a triangle tip. I don't care about wraps too much, it could either have, or not have one.

This is the cue I have been looking at- http://billiardwarehouse.com/cues/mcdermott/mcderm_m4-3b.htm

The only problem is that nobody I have talked to, has seemed to know anything about it, as far as playability, etc... Is there anybody on here that could share any information on it?

I'm open to all suggestions, but I'd prefer sticking to the McD line,
All help appreciated,
Shoo. </div></div>
I don't want to offend, so don't take this in the wrong way.
At the age of 16 and only playing seriously for a short time, you probably don't have a firm idea of what you like and don't like, as far as playability. You would fall in the catagory of "Beginner".
The McD line of cues is an excellent line of cues for any beginner, especially with their warranty.
If you think you would like that cue, I would recommend you buy it and use is for several years. In that time, try out other cues, when you can, and learn what you like and don't like about cues in general. When you are more experienced, and have a little extra money in your pocket, you may want to step up. You may also decide to stay with the McD, which wouldn't be a bad choice.

ShooHead
06-09-2008, 07:31 PM
Oh, no offense taken at all, that's my bad, I should have phased that better...

I've been taken it seriously for a long while, but for the past few months I've been training with a couple other guys for 4-5 hours a day.

jed1894
06-09-2008, 08:19 PM
Very good that you're playing pool at 16. Keep it up. Now, about the Mcdermott:

I have two and the one you're looking at is a great looking cue. However, you can get a cheaper McDermott if you're not sure about how you're going to like it. For $300, you can get a McDermott and another cue and try them both. But, you can't go wrong with the McDermott.

You will first notice the hit of the Triangle tip (if you haven't try one already). It is suppose to be a hard tip, but they hit very nice. Not to hard....just right. To me, they do not feel as hard as they're advertised to be.

The next thing you'll probably notice is that the McDermott is weighted more to the rear. Some people like this, some don't. If you shoot with a closed bridge, this will not be as noticeable. I shot mostly with an open bridge so a butt heavy cue is a little more noticeable. Some people call this balance point. My McDermott has a balance point of about 16 1/4 inches from the butt. Versus my Joss which is about 19 1/4. But the Joss has a steel joint and the McDermott is wood-to-wood. Unless you focus on this, it won't make any difference in pocketing balls.

I can't think of anything else now other than you'll like the McDermott and it comes with a great warranty. I don't want to recommend any other cue because you have done some research and I don't want to confuse you. However, if you do want information on other cues, ask. I own about 15 different brands and buying new ones every so often. I can you give you an honest unbiased opinion on any cue that I have.

Good luck and have fun.....also, one more piece of advice. Get the cue and play it. Don't get caught up in how you think other cues may feel. There is no majic stick. It's the archer not the arrow. You'll drive yourself crazy at a young age if you do like I have done and constantly wonder if a different cue will play better.

JED

1Time
06-09-2008, 08:31 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ShooHead</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Since this is my first post, let me begin by saying that I am 16 years old, and have been living in NC my whole life. I've been playing pool a little forever, but lately ( pass 3-4 months ), I've been in a serious training phase. Pool IS my life, my job, and my therapy /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif And that's all for that...</div></div>
Hey Shoo, it's about time someone on this board took pool seriously... :). Welcome.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ShooHead</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I've been searching for a new cue, and I can go up to $300. I would like it to be 18oz, have a 12mm shaft, wood-to-wood joint, and a triangle tip. I don't care about wraps too much, it could either have, or not have one.</div></div>
Are you wanting a new cue with these specifications because you're hoping this will give you a cue that will shoot better for you than many other new or used cues with different specifications? The reason I ask is, chances are quite good that after buying a cue with these specifications, you later could find a cue with different specifications that shoots better for you, simply by comparing the two cues at the table. Which is to say, you're better off buying a cue in person after comparing it to many others.

So which is more important to you 1) to buy a new cue with these specifications or 2) to buy a cue that shoots better for you than a new cue with those specifications? Since you're serious about pool, I'm guessing you would rather have the cue that shoots better for you. And that may or may not be a cue with these specifications, and that may not be a cue that many consider to shoot well or is popular. It may or may not be a McDermott.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ShooHead</div><div class="ubbcode-body">This is the cue I have been looking at- http://billiardwarehouse.com/cues/mcdermott/mcderm_m4-3b.htm</div></div>
There's no way to know if this cue will shoot better for you than some $50 used cue that's for sale right now in your area, that is, unless you compare it with many others at the table. However, you can make educated guesses about the specifications that should work best for you, just as you have done. However, without first trying out the cue and comparing it to others, you're still just guessing. So why not first compare several cues to see what works best for you, and then choose from the ones you have compared? Of course there are not that many 12mm cues around to try, and that's just going to make your search all the harder, even more subject to guessing and improbability. So here's what you could do. Buy a cheap cue (to minimize your losses), have it turned down to 12mm, and then go compare it to many other cues that are for sale in your area. I'm not suggesting a 12mm cue should not work best for you. I am suggesting you will be far better off comparing many cues to see what works best for you. But even after determining these specifications, it's still not best to buy a cue without first comparing it to other similar cues. It's your gamble, and I'm telling you the odds are not in your favor.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ShooHead</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The only problem is that nobody I have talked to, has seemed to know anything about it, as far as playability, etc... Is there anybody on here that could share any information on it?</div></div>
This alone indicates you're going about this all wrong. It makes no difference how anyone else has experienced this particular cue, or any McDermott cues, or any cues with the specifications you've stated. What matters most is how a particular cue shoots for you as compared to other cues, and that goes for cue tips too.

1Time
06-09-2008, 08:37 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jed1894</div><div class="ubbcode-body">But, you can't go wrong with the McDermott.</div></div>
McDermotts are quality cues, but like with any brand of cue, you can go wrong by buying a cue without first comparing it to others. For example, a $300 McDermott cue is bought only then to later find the guy prefers how a $50 used cue plays for him.

1Time
06-09-2008, 08:44 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rich R.</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> You may also decide to stay with the McD, which wouldn't be a bad choice. </div></div>
Nothing wrong with McDermott's quality, and if that's what you're looking for, I agree that McDermott would not be a bad choice.

However, if you're looking for a cue that will shoot better for you than many other cues, you're better off trying many different cues to see what works best for you. And that means heavier and lighter cues, cues with different tips, and shafts of different diameters and flex or stiffness. Most don't try a lot of different things like this, and I'm one of them. However, I can tell you that I have benefitted from trying a few different things like this. Equipment makes a difference.

Rich R.
06-10-2008, 07:09 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jed1894</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You will first notice the hit of the Triangle tip (if you haven't try one already). It is suppose to be a hard tip, but they hit very nice. Not to hard....just right. To me, they do not feel as hard as they're advertised to be.

<span style="color: #FF0000">IMHO, the Triangle tips start out feeling like a soft tip. However, as you play with them, they compress and become much harder and end up comparable to any hard tip. Actually, they become too hard for my taste, but that is a personal thing. </span>

The next thing you'll probably notice is that the McDermott is weighted more to the rear. Some people like this, some don't. If you shoot with a closed bridge, this will not be as noticeable. I shot mostly with an open bridge so a butt heavy cue is a little more noticeable. Some people call this balance point. My McDermott has a balance point of about 16 1/4 inches from the butt. Versus my Joss which is about 19 1/4. But the Joss has a steel joint and the McDermott is wood-to-wood. Unless you focus on this, it won't make any difference in pocketing balls.

<span style="color: #FF0000">All production cues, including the McD's, have interchangeable weight bolts in the butt, to make it easy to change the weight of the cue for different customers. The cues are actually made fairly light, to accomodate the customers preferring lighter cues. Any additional weight is added via the weight bolts. Obviously, adding weight, via the weight bolt, will make the cue butt heavy.</span>
</div></div>

DeadCrab
06-10-2008, 07:46 AM
I can't advise regarding this specific cue. However, you do have an advantage buying from a place like Billiards Warehouse, where they have a return policy. So, if the stick comes and is not balanced to your liking, you can send it back. Read their guarantee closely before buying and using the cue, especially whether or not they will accept a returned chalked cue.

For the money you are spending, you could get two base McDermott models, like the C-100. You could use one for breaking, the other for playing. You might also want to consider a layered tip for your playing cue. I won't speculate as to whether a $350 McDermott really plays any better than their basic models, or just looks better.

JJFSTAR
06-10-2008, 09:19 AM
ShooHead welcome to the board I am a McDermott owner. I have a 20oz old D7? I bought the new I2 shaft and I couldn’t be happier. I have an old jump/break cue that I won in 1998 or 1999. I believe McDermott to be the best all-around line of cue but the after thought is “for me” you say that you want to “stick to the McD line”. So does that mean you shoot with a McD now?

The question of what are you playing with now is essential; at least for me to know before I could offer any solid advice. I can only offer what my experience has been with them and here it is. If you like the feel of McD’s in general I would stick to them for now. As far as buying a cue that I never hit a ball with? I personally wouldn’t, if you’re around a lot of serious pool players sticks will change hands around you as sure as the sun rises and sets; your 16 have patience, I know that’s going to be hard.

As far as “playability” goes McD’s have a similar “feel” its kind of like a clothing manufacturer if you like the “style and feel” of jeans a particular company makes it is very likely that you will like the “style and feel” of another pair made by the same company.

McD’s are not “super action” cues like Mucci’s. They IMHO have the best blend of action, accuracy and control. They are also cues that won’t break your bank. They also make a line of low deflection shafts called the “I” series. The hit of the “I2” is almost identical to a “Z2” although that is also “for me”. But I wouldn’t go with the low deflection technology right away. I would play around with as many different types of low deflection shafts as you can before going down that road.

And now for my final idea; you may or may not find this really stupid to say, and if is stupid just let me know. You’re 16 can’t you tell your parents or grandparents that you would like a McD pool stick for Christmas or your birthday? That way you can spend your $300 on a multi stick case, moose bridge, magnetic caulker, jump cue, cue paper and a couple of tip tools. If this is what is happening disregard what I said.

ShooHead
06-10-2008, 09:53 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1Time</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hey Shoo, it's about time someone on this board took pool seriously... :). Welcome.

Are you wanting a new cue with these specifications because you're hoping this will give you a cue that will shoot better for you than many other new or used cues with different specifications? The reason I ask is, chances are quite good that after buying a cue with these specifications, you later could find a cue with different specifications that shoots better for you, simply by comparing the two cues at the table. Which is to say, you're better off buying a cue in person after comparing it to many others.

<span style="color: #FF0000">The main reason I'm looking for these specifications is because I had a chance to play with these almost exact specs ( it was a 19oz, only difference ), and it was just butter. But I realize there may have been something to the cue that did not directly meet my eye, different balance point, tip, etc... that changed the way it played</span>

So which is more important to you 1) to buy a new cue with these specifications or 2) to buy a cue that shoots better for you than a new cue with those specifications? Since you're serious about pool, I'm guessing you would rather have the cue that shoots better for you. And that may or may not be a cue with these specifications, and that may not be a cue that many consider to shoot well or is popular. It may or may not be a McDermott.

<span style="color: #FF0000">True. I much rather have a cue that'll shoot better for me that cost $20, than I had one that's a thousand that'll throw me off... I guess I've just grown to trust McD's a little better than any other brand, just because I've had a chance to play with more of them.</span></div></div>

ShooHead
06-10-2008, 10:07 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JJFSTAR</div><div class="ubbcode-body">ShooHead welcome to the board I am a McDermott owner. I have a 20oz old D7? I bought the new I2 shaft and I couldn’t be happier. I have an old jump/break cue that I won in 1998 or 1999. I believe McDermott to be the best all-around line of cue but the after thought is “for me” you say that you want to “stick to the McD line”. So does that mean you shoot with a McD now?

<span style="color: #FF0000">Well I can't say I shoot with one, but I've shot with a few, and I do have a bit of McD envy /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif</span>

The question of what are you playing with now is essential; at least for me to know before I could offer any solid advice. I can only offer what my experience has been with them and here it is. If you like the feel of McD’s in general I would stick to them for now. As far as buying a cue that I never hit a ball with? I personally wouldn’t, if you’re around a lot of serious pool players sticks will change hands around you as sure as the sun rises and sets; your 16 have patience, I know that’s going to be hard.

<span style="color: #FF0000">Currently I've got a players, and don't get me wrong, it's a good stick, but after playing with a few others, the "feel" just isn't right. For me.</span>

And now for my final idea; you may or may not find this really stupid to say, and if is stupid just let me know. You’re 16 can’t you tell your parents or grandparents that you would like a McD pool stick for Christmas or your birthday? That way you can spend your $300 on a multi stick case, moose bridge, magnetic caulker, jump cue, cue paper and a couple of tip tools. If this is what is happening disregard what I said.

<span style="color: #FF0000">Ehh... I wish it was happening like that /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smirk.gif Currently my players is paying for this.</span></div></div>

1Time
06-10-2008, 11:37 AM
Shoo, I'm posting again because I don't know if you got the jist of my previous post. If you buy online without first comparing the exact model and specifications of the cue to many other cues, you very, very likely will end up with a cue that you do not prefer to one you could find locally. For example, you buy a $300 McDermott and shoot with it for a few months. Then later you go around trying other cues and find one that feels better in your hands and one you prefer. Moral of the story: shop around with a cue in your hands while hitting balls.

But if you're already determined to buy a cue with these specifications, just be prepared to pay the price of selling it. You're likely to end up with a custom cue (12mm) that many players don't want, and a cue that you're likely to later find you don't prefer to another.

It's great to buy a new cue, BUT first go find exactly what cue, model, specs, and tip that works best for you, and then buy it online if you want, or buy the one in your hands that you found locally, new or used. Don't be suprised if the new cue you buy online does not play better for you than one you've already shot with. And don't get suckered into online store free return policies. They're hoping you won't compare their cues to others that are available locally and that you will settle for one of theirs. How soon do you want a new cue anyway? They know you want one now and that you won't want to buy several of them over and over again to send back to them if you don't want them. Online stores probably won't do this with many cues anyway, let alone 12mm special order cues.

1Time
06-10-2008, 11:59 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rich R.</div><div class="ubbcode-body">IMHO, the Triangle tips start out feeling like a soft tip. However, as you play with them, they compress and become much harder and end up comparable to any hard tip. Actually, they become too hard for my taste, but that is a personal thing.</div></div>
Good to know. Thanks

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rich R.</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The next thing you'll probably notice is that the McDermott is weighted more to the rear. Some people like this, some don't. If you shoot with a closed bridge, this will not be as noticeable. I shot mostly with an open bridge so a butt heavy cue is a little more noticeable. Some people call this balance point. My McDermott has a balance point of about 16 1/4 inches from the butt. Versus my Joss which is about 19 1/4. But the Joss has a steel joint and the McDermott is wood-to-wood. Unless you focus on this, it won't make any difference in pocketing balls.</div></div>
Balance point measurements such as this are more valuable when you know the length of the cue. I assume you're referring to a standard 58" length.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rich R.</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All production cues, including the McD's, have interchangeable weight bolts in the butt, to make it easy to change the weight of the cue for different customers. The cues are actually made fairly light, to accomodate the customers preferring lighter cues. Any additional weight is added via the weight bolts. Obviously, adding weight, via the weight bolt, will make the cue butt heavy.</div></div>
Many brands of production cues have interchangeable weight bolts, but not all. And it's not difficult or expensive to have a cue maker position a custom weight inside the butt that's closer to the joint.

ShooHead
06-10-2008, 08:20 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1Time</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Shoo, I'm posting again because I don't know if you got the jist of my previous post. If you buy online without first comparing the exact model and specifications of the cue to many other cues, you very, very likely will end up with a cue that you do not prefer to one you could find locally. For example, you buy a $300 McDermott and shoot with it for a few months. Then later you go around trying other cues and find one that feels better in your hands and one you prefer. Moral of the story: shop around with a cue in your hands while hitting balls.

<span style="color: #FF0000">I fully understand what you're talking about when you say this... It happened to one of the guys I train with when he got a bug up his ass to buy a $600 cue /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smirk.gif It looked good, but that was about it. ( for him anyhow, he ended up hating it )</span>

But if you're already determined to buy a cue with these specifications, just be prepared to pay the price of selling it. You're likely to end up with a custom cue (12mm) that many players don't want, and a cue that you're likely to later find you don't prefer to another.

<span style="color: #FF0000">Once again I understand what you're saying, but as far as the shaft size is concerned, I just like the 12mm size ( for me ).</span>

They're hoping you won't compare their cues to others that are available locally and that you will settle for one of theirs. How soon do you want a new cue anyway? They know you want one now and that you won't want to buy several of them over and over again to send back to them if you don't want them. Online stores probably won't do this with many cues anyway, let alone 12mm special order cues.

<span style="color: #FF0000">Yea, I'm definitely testing out as many as I can, and most likely will not make my purchase for another month or so. And I don't trust too many store guarantees either, that's just a way they can screw you into buying their product. But I mean, I'm taking my time, a pool cue is like an extension of yourself, it isn't something you can just rush into and hope it works out.</span></div></div>

JJFSTAR
06-11-2008, 08:56 AM
If you have "McD envy" it is very likely that you would really like that cue however the more sure way of getting a cue that is your dream cue is to spread the word that you are looking for a McD. Don’t tell anyone what you want to spend but tell everybody who is a good player at the pool hall that you are looking for a 12mm 18oz McD.

At some point in the near future someone is going to show up with one. Or tell you about some "contact" or "Connection" that they have. I have one I got my "I2" for $120 you can go look on eBay they sell for $225-$295 be patient your dream cue at some point is going to be on a table sitting in front of you soon.

That is not to say that the cue you have in mind will not be a good cue the chances are if you have "McD envy" as you say abut 90% that you are going to think it is terrific. But do you want a terrific cue now or your dream cue next year?

MAC
06-11-2008, 01:21 PM
Hey Shoo, I know how you feel about McDermott. I recently purchased a M6-4B professional series cue and absolutely love it. I have played mostly with Vikings,Players and a Woodworth cue. I like the feel and the hit of the McDermott the best aside from the Woodworth which is one I just couldn't afford at the time,but I will have one. I've been told once you get over the $150-$175 your buying nothing more than looks. I dont know if that holds true,but plenty of people on this forum have enough knowledge of cues to know if thats correct. Good luck looking for your new cue. Oh,yeah I also ditched the Triangle tip for a LePro thats suits me much better.
Mac

ShooHead
06-11-2008, 10:36 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: MAC</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hey Shoo, I know how you feel about McDermott. I recently purchased a M6-4B professional series cue and absolutely love it. I have played mostly with Vikings,Players and a Woodworth cue. I like the feel and the hit of the McDermott the best aside from the Woodworth which is one I just couldn't afford at the time,but I will have one. I've been told once you get over the $150-$175 your buying nothing more than looks. I dont know if that holds true,but plenty of people on this forum have enough knowledge of cues to know if thats correct. Good luck looking for your new cue. Oh,yeah I also ditched the Triangle tip for a LePro thats suits me much better.
Mac </div></div>

I fully believe that about the looks part, whenever something's got 40 million ivory inlays, with turquoise accents, you quit paying for quality a ways back.

edit- not quality as in the way it plays, but you could probably end up getting a stick that'd be a lot cheaper, and it still play just as good. Or better.

Jager85
06-17-2008, 10:10 AM
Welcome Shoo,

I currently shoot with a McD Alpha Plus. When I bought it it was after hitting with my friends Genesis, and they are practically the same except the AP has no wrap. I am not 100% happy with the feel, it is too stiff for my tastes, but it is not really stiff, don't get me wrong. I will be sending my shaft in next week for a turn down, a new ferrule (Saber T), and a new tip, Sniper. I will post when I get it back on the way I like the feel.

First you really need to know what kind of playable feel are you going for. McD is kind of middle of the road from what I know, but I just recently started experimenting with new cues/shafts/ferrules/tips.

zombiemodder
07-14-2008, 10:06 AM
Hi, i also hail from th NC anyway have you tried ebay? You can get a much better cue on there such as Meucci, Viking for under $200 and most of them are like new. Take a look.

MAC
07-14-2008, 01:49 PM
I agree they can be found cheaper on ebay. However I would only buy new if I went that route. I bought a used cue on ebay and ofcourse it was advertised as being a straight cue, it was not as advertised when I received it.

JWasson
07-14-2008, 08:11 PM
Especially with the McDermott cues, eBay seems to be about the best option to purchase one as long as you already know what you want. (as explained earlier in this topic). You can pick up a new McDermott for half the retail price most of the time and many times well below that by searching on eBay. Just make sure that the seller is actually an authorized McDermott dealer so your warranty will be valid. A few of the sellers even include a worksheet in the listing to special order changes such as type of tip, tip diameter, or even changes to the wrap. Do your homework before buying on eBay and I think you'll be happy with the results. That's been my experience at least.

BillyJack
07-14-2008, 09:55 PM
Shoo,
I currently have two McDermotts, a plain-jane Morada with a leather wrap, and a cocobola, also with leather, both good shootin' pieces. I personally don't care for their all-maple cues, but that's just my opinion. Tail-heavy shouldn't be much of a problem at 18 oz. When you get up to 19 oz. and beyond, that weight bolt in the extreme rear of the butt moves the balance point back. I set up mine with Joss bolts, winding them down till they bottom in the cavity to move the balance forward a bit. If you haven't already, search McD's website for a dealer in your area. Worth visiting a really good dealer, even if it's a hundred mile drive. No offense to online dealers, but nothing beats having a cue in hand before you commit. We have a dealer in Pittsburgh who has great service, and consistently beats the online sellers, since McD dealers are supposed to advertise no more than 20% off list. You may be fortunate and find one within a reasonable distance from home. Also, are you sure you want a 12mm shaft? If you have any intention of reselling in the future, many folks won't consider anything less than 12.5 mm, so a 12 limits your market greatly. Hope this helps.
Bill

JWasson
07-15-2008, 04:09 AM
Just to give you an example of the savings you can get using eBay, I bought this McDermott M72H with a leather wrap for just a tad over $200 including shipping just a few weeks ago. It is new and was purchased from an authorized McDermott dealer. The original price was over $400 not including an additional $50 for the leather wrap instead of the Irish Linen.
I also picked up an extra brand new shaft with the correct matching collar for a great price as well just a week later.
You really should know what you want before buying a cue in this manner though, but it can save you some serious bucks..

http://wassonhuntingservices.com/phpBB/userpix4/2_cue1_1.jpg


http://wassonhuntingservices.com/phpBB/userpix4/2_cue6_1.jpg

http://wassonhuntingservices.com/phpBB/userpix4/2_cue2_1.jpg

JJFSTAR
07-15-2008, 06:00 AM
Hey BillyJack where are you from exactly? And when you say you know a dealer are you talking about Ron?

BillyJack
07-15-2008, 11:27 AM
I live in Upper St. Clair, near the South Hills Village Mall. My McDermott and Joss cues came from "The Dart Shoppe" in Glassport, a dealer for McDermott, Joss, Viking and Pechauer.

Bill

Cornerman
07-16-2008, 07:39 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ShooHead</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I've been training with a couple other guys for 4-5 hours a day. </div></div>What do they shoot with? Do you like their cues?

Fred

skin
07-16-2008, 03:59 PM
I have been doing a lot research on cues because I am in the market for a new one also. The only advantages to a break down cue that I have seen are convenience. Much of what is touted as warpage resistance in the shafts seems intended for the player who doesn't take care of his cue.

I haven't decided exactly yet what I will buy, but I am strongly leaning towards one of two options:

1) a one piece with a (big!) box case

2) a one piece cut in two with a 3-cushion cue wood pin joint

The top of the line elements for each would be, therefore, the taper and tip first, and then the ferrule.

The central issues for me are even force transference after the strike and minimal cue ball deflection.

I figure I can get a stick like I want for about $60 off-shelf price plus $20 extra for parts, and maybe another $100 or less to the local cue guy to alter it or make it a break down.

And, it would be much better for me than a production cue, of which I have owned many with only one suiting my game.

My advice to you is to keep using house sticks with good tips until you fully understand what kind of game you want to play and are good at. Otherwise, you are risking buying a cue that will dictate how you will play in ways which may not be natural to you.