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View Full Version : 8ball to 3 cushion ???



brian_m
07-02-2008, 02:11 PM
well a friend and i were out playing pool last night and got to talking about my new table that i am about to get. and were thinking about trying to make blocks to block off the pockets so we could learn how to play 3 cushion. do yall know of anywhere that sells somthing like this or are we just going to have to make our own? and has anyone ever seen anything like this done before?

i have never played 3 cushion but it looks like a real challange and i would like to give it a try. (i know that my table will not be as big as what they normally use but it would still be fun)

DeadCrab
07-02-2008, 02:48 PM
Yes, it has been done before. Brunswick once made a table with interchangable rails for pool and billiards.

Billiards is played with larger balls, so you need rails designed with higher cushion nose.

Bridging the pockets with short pieces of rails is possible, and would allow the use of pool balls, but you would have to have the ability to mill the rails yourself, would have to deal with seams, and I am skeptical that they would play correctly.

I would suggest not altering your new table, and finding a pool hall to play billiards.

If you are an expert woodworker, if might make for an interesting challenge, but otherwise, is an invitation for disaster.

brian_m
07-02-2008, 03:11 PM
ah i didnt know they were played with bigger balls. that would be a problem for rail height. i am a 3 gen carpenter so i feel that i could make somthing but. yeah i dont want to alter my new table in any way. was just thinking about trying to find some bulk bumper and then making a wedge to slide into the pocket. but i get what you are saying it very well could hit right on the seam and go back the direction that it was coming from insted of following its normal path. hmmmmmmmm

JJFSTAR
07-03-2008, 09:37 AM
Why not just play cowboy? It is fun, instructive and better for pool players than billiards anyway IMHO.

RULES: COWBOY


This game combines the respective skills and demands of carom and pocket billiards.

Equipment: The game is played with the cue ball and the 1, 3 and 5 object balls. The object balls are placed as follows: the 3 ball on the foot spot; the 5 ball on the center spot, and the 1 ball on the head spot.

Objective: The object of this game is to score exactly 101 points. The scoring must be done in three segments: one of 90 points, one of 10 points, and one of 1 point.

Play: The starting player, with the cue ball in hand, must begin play from behind the head string, with the 3 ball as the first object ball.

The first 90 points must be scored using the following point values:
A. 1 point is scored for a carom on two object balls.
B. 2 points are scored for a carom on three object balls.
C. The face value is scored for pocketing an object ball. For instance, the 3 ball, if pocketed legally, gives the player 3 points.

After each player attains the score of 90 points exactly, he must make the next 10 points by carom scores only.

After scoring 100 points, the last point is scored by a carom shot of the cue ball off the 1 ball into a pocket called by the player. The cue ball must not contact a second object ball before the cue ball goes into the pocket. If the cue ball is potted in a pocket not called, the player loses all the points scored in the inning.

Special rules:
A. An object ball, when pocketed, must be placed on its original spot.
B. Should the original spot be occupied, the ball or balls to be spotted must be held off of the table until spots become open.
C. If a player with exactly 100 points is at the table, and the 1 ball is pocketed, he may have the balls spotted, as in the beginning of the game, and commence play with the cue ball in hand from behind the head string.
D. A player with exactly 90 points loses his turn and the points scored in that inning, if he pockets an object ball while scoring from 91 to 100.
E. Except for the 101st point, the player loses his inning and any points scored for pocketing the cue ball.
F. Should a player force the cue ball off the table, his inning is ended, and any points scored are erased.
C. When a cue ball is scratched into a pocket, the incoming player, with cue ball in hand, must resume play from behind the head string. He must play to, and contact, an object ball or cushion in front of the head strip.
H. When a player with 100 points fails to hit the 1 ball in his attempt to make the 101st point, his turn is lost and all points scored in that inning are erased.
I. When the cue ball is frozen to an object ball, the player must move the object ball with his shot, and drive the cue ball to a rail. A scratch is called upon failure, and the player's turn and points made in that inning are lost.
J. Should a player pocket the cue ball twice consecutively, without touching an object ball, he forfeits the game.

I play that you just clear the table without special rule A. and just reset when the table is clear it is a little more challenging that way. If you play with special rule A; a good player will run the 1st 90 all the time.

You can also remove the 5 ball for the last 10 and have to go 3 rails if you want to make it even more challenging. But its a really good game without special rule A.

JoeW
07-03-2008, 05:40 PM
I have pocket inserts to convert a pool table into a billiards table made by Brunswick (see photos below). I do not think that you can buy them anymore. I had to alter them a little to fit my Gold Crown III. The table plays well as a billiards table and it is very seldom that I hit the cracks in the inserts. A serious billiards player would probably object but for my home table they are fine.

A billiard ball is 2.5" (pool balls are 2.25"). The rails on a billiard table and on a pool table are the same height.

http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q146/JoeW04/Billiardplug001.jpg

http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q146/JoeW04/Billiardplug002.jpg

http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q146/JoeW04/Billiardplug003.jpg

http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q146/JoeW04/Billiardplug004.jpg

Bambu
07-04-2008, 07:48 AM
never saw those before, pretty cool. Thanks joe.

mike60
07-04-2008, 03:19 PM
Here are two websites pertaining to pocket converters:
http://www.google.com/patents?id=i9gwAAA...=result#PPA1,M1 (http://www.google.com/patents?id=i9gwAAAAEBAJ&pg=PA1&lpg=PA1&dq=United+States+Patent+4318543&source=web&ots=ndOeCKJ646&sig=59XXzGy2QlICUpD_wW9-G917vB4&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=5&ct=result#PPA1,M1)

http://www.google.com/patents?id=Bsc6AAA...=result#PPA1,M1 (http://www.google.com/patents?id=Bsc6AAAAEBAJ&pg=PA7&lpg=PA7&dq=United+States+Patent+4010949&source=web&ots=PNHf5bjMBi&sig=qqDT1AEJjxwDJGldV0Gsp4I3rYI&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=9&ct=result#PPA1,M1)

Some searching may show availability.
mike60

DeadCrab
07-04-2008, 04:31 PM
****************
A billiard ball is 2.5" (pool balls are 2.25"). The rails on a billiard table and on a pool table are the same height.
*****************

Believe me, if I thought I could get any kind of reasonable play out of k-66 cushions 4mm too low, I would chop my 1.75 inch thick rails to 1.5 inches immediately. It would be so much easier to shoot off the rail then.

A 4 mm shift in cushion height is a lot. It might bank without the balls jumping, but I am skeptical that it would bank true. Might be wise to see how billiard balls play on your cushions before investing much in this.

Bob_Jewett
07-05-2008, 05:00 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">... A billiard ball is 2.5" (pool balls are 2.25"). ...
</div></div>
Pool balls are 57.15mm while carom balls are 61.5mm. The latter is 2.421 inches, so the problem is not quite so bad. An alternative its to use pool balls on the pool table.

HALHOULE
07-05-2008, 05:00 PM
one aim for any and all angles of shot

Cornerman
07-06-2008, 09:34 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bob_Jewett</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">... A billiard ball is 2.5" (pool balls are 2.25"). ...
</div></div>
Pool balls are 57.15mm while carom balls are 61.5mm. The latter is 2.421 inches, so the problem is not quite so bad. An alternative its to use pool balls on the pool table. </div></div>

I need some clarification here Bob. What is the standard height for a European Carom table? I guess that's the question. I see some standards that suggest that the toleranced height of the cushion for a billiard table is for all intents and purposes the same as the toleranced height of pool table cushion. I wouldn't have thought so, and since I dont' seem to have a rule book on me, I might as well ask online.

Fred

DeadCrab
07-06-2008, 02:26 PM
WPA states that for tournament play:

Rail height (nose-line to table-bed) should be 63 % (+1 %) or between 62 % and 64 % of the diameter of the ball.

Bob_Jewett
07-06-2008, 04:43 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Cornerman</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> ... I need some clarification here Bob. What is the standard height for a European Carom table? ... </div></div>
This is available in the rules for carom billiards on the UMB website. It says, in part:

<span style="color: #3333FF">The demarcation of the playing surface is effected by setting up rubber cushions of 37 mm in height at the frontmost point of the cushion. An allowance of plus or minus 1 mm is admitted.</span>

That's 60.2% of the height of the ball, which seems low, but there it is. As I calculate it (from the 63.5% number given above), cushions could be legal for both games.

Cornerman
07-06-2008, 05:48 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bob_Jewett</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Cornerman</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> ... I need some clarification here Bob. What is the standard height for a European Carom table? ... </div></div>
This is available in the rules for carom billiards on the UMB website. It says, in part:

<span style="color: #3333FF">The demarcation of the playing surface is effected by setting up rubber cushions of 37 mm in height at the frontmost point of the cushion. An allowance of plus or minus 1 mm is admitted.</span>

That's 60.2% of the height of the ball, which seems low, but there it is. As I calculate it (from the 63.5% number given above), cushions could be legal for both games. </div></div>That's what I go, too.

Fred