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crow4435
07-17-2008, 09:11 PM
i have 4 cues i got when i bought my 8ft olhausen reno, 8 other cues i bought online for about 15.00 ea AND THEN bought an adreneline cue just for me. did i do right or should i have just bought a more expensive cue for myself? the 4 i got with the table were ok and the other 8 were for house cues. i'm just wondering if i sold myself short for a personal cue.

New2Pool
07-18-2008, 08:18 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: crow4435</div><div class="ubbcode-body">i have 4 cues i got when i bought my 8ft olhausen reno, 8 other cues i bought online for about 15.00 ea AND THEN bought an adreneline cue just for me. did i do right or should i have just bought a more expensive cue for myself? the 4 i got with the table were ok and the other 8 were for house cues. i'm just wondering if i sold myself short for a personal cue. </div></div>

Well, being very new to pool myself I probably have a "fresher" perspective than the seasoned veterans who don't remember as much about being clueless.

I bought an inexpensive McDermott as my starter cue. I live in a small town and the few places we have around here to play pool don't have many house cues that are playable. The house cues tend to be filthy and crooked so I like to have my own cue to play with.

I recently visited a nice pool shop in a larger city and they allowed me to hit with some higher end cues. In the few minutes I hit, I could not tell a positive difference between the high end cues and my cue. For that matter, I can't really tell a playing difference between the inexpensive house cues I have and my two piece. When I say "a difference" I don't mean they hit the same I just mean that I can't tell that one is better than the other or that one lets me do more things.

So for now I love hitting with my McDermott and it plays great for my skill level. After I get better at the basics then I will start worrying about getting a new cue. But when I miss the shot the problem is not the cue.

So to answer your question, if you like the way your cue hits then it is a great starter cue. It also has the advantage of being kind of like your first girlfriend. You can make mistakes and learn how to treat it so that later on when you fall in love with "the cue" you will learn how to treat it with the respect it deserves. If you do things such as cleaning an inexpensive cue with water /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/blush.gif then you can salvage the cue and learn from your mistakes.

Bambu
07-18-2008, 09:36 AM
You may not notice the difference in playability, but it does exist. Years from now you should still have any good cue you buy. Consider a new viking, mcdermott, or meucci in the 200 range. http://www.billiardwarehouse.com
Or you can get a used predator, or other name brand sneaky pete/low end cue. Try ebay and you should find something used for half price of retail or better. Make sure you ask the merchant if the cue rolls straight before bidding.

cjt08046
07-18-2008, 11:22 AM
I bought my first cue about a year and a half ago, so I remember the thought process you're going through (I'm not lucky enough to have my own table though /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
I, like you, went to a place that let me shoot with various cues from three makers McD, Viking and Joss. Though they felt pretty good, there was one cue, just happened to be a Viking, that was head and shoulders above the rest in terms of hit and that enigmatic "feel" factor-- and it was in my price range of around $200 ($188). If your Adrenaline feels good to you, by all means use it, but keep an open mind regarding a slightly up-market cue. Who knows, a slightly more expensive, better-made cue may simply avoid warpage over the long haul, which will enhance its playability over time for you. As Bambu wrote, the differences are there, and you'll notice them when you play with a well-made cue that simply feels better to you than the others, and maybe does things such as allow you to use more english and not throw the cue ball off line as dramatically. I don't think you sold yourself short if your current stick feels good to you, but be open to a slightly-higher-end cue. You might be surprised.
Good luck with your table and cues!

MAC
07-18-2008, 03:44 PM
I spent a little bit more than I wanted to on my cue. I knew it wasnt any better than the other stick I was considering purchasing. I don't know it was just something about the confidence the cue gave me, it makes me feel like I cant lose. Even when I do lose Im not as down about when I was with my cheaper cue. You should check out OZONE BILLIARDS when you do decide on a cue they have good pricing free shipping and throw in a case.

crow4435
07-18-2008, 11:13 PM
hey mac, ozone just happens to be where i bought my cue from. i bought the 8 cheap house cues from platinum billiards. they have a rough feeling to them i can't get out. i like ozone. they took care of me when i was ordering misc stuff and ups lost it. i hope to outgrow the cue i have now which would mean i'm getting better. maybe by that time i can afford a better cue too.

bignick31985
07-19-2008, 07:25 AM
I have used Players or Action cues since I started, until about a year ago. I bought a Lucasi LE-T and havent looked back. The feel is much better than I would have expected.

The g/f uses an Action and whenever she switches to my Lucasi she always says, "How come you cue feels better when I play than mine?"

I attribute it to Action costing about 50 bucks, and the Lucasi was right @ $200. Not just price, but the way its built and the materials used. I specifically notice the difference in the stiffness of the shaft as well.

1Time
07-19-2008, 03:09 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: crow4435</div><div class="ubbcode-body">i have 4 cues i got when i bought my 8ft olhausen reno, 8 other cues i bought online for about 15.00 ea AND THEN bought an adreneline cue just for me. did i do right or should i have just bought a more expensive cue for myself? the 4 i got with the table were ok and the other 8 were for house cues. i'm just wondering if i sold myself short for a personal cue. </div></div>
You may have sold yourself short, but there's no way to know yet. There's nothing saying the cue you will shoot best with should be the most expensive one you've considered. You can learn a lot about what you likely will benefit from in a personal cue by trying a lot of different cues. As you try the different cues you have, you eventually will notice things about them that you prefer and don't. Once you've developed a feel for these preferences, you will be in a better position to compare your cue(s) with other cues and know if you will benefit from buying a replacement.

KellyStick
07-22-2008, 06:16 AM
My first cue was off the rack at a place called Jumbo Sports (a sporting goods store). I liked it very much but I lost it in Doha Qatar after drinking too much beer after being several months in the Dry country of Saudi Arabia. I wish I still had it. It cost me I think $45 and was a "Competition" brand. Don't really know who that is (competition).

Anyway, I selected from several cues finding this one to simply "feel" good. Most of the others felt cheap, loose, rough and fragile. As I looked at it years later and others looked at it that knew pool they made generally positive comments. It was straight and solid not wimpy feeling like many two piece crap sticks. Anyway I would not worry so much about the cost. More the feel and make sure you have a good tip. Though a $15-20 two piece stick is likely to be junk more than not. In your case with a bar that has only firewood on the wall, any stick that is your's that has a good tip is going to be a big plus!

Incidently, I called my first stick Firewood as named by Mike Johnson when he put a tip on it. I liked the name and the stick. Personally I don't think I could ever buy a stick on line without hefting it at least.

MAC
07-22-2008, 10:19 AM
Ozone is a good place for some good pricing especially with the incentives they give you. Just try playing with as many different cues as you can before you invest a good amount of money into a cue. Experiement with different tips soft vs harder etc. try some cue with wood to wood joints vs steel to wood etc. That is the only regret I have, dont get me wrong I love my cue. Instead of trying out different cues on my own I took some advice from a excellent player in my area and he said the way I play and my stroke I would really like a wood to wood joint thats why I went the McDermott.

KellyStick
07-22-2008, 11:31 AM
MAC, what is it about your stroke that makes a wood to wood joint better? Never heard that one and am curious. Never really shot with one either. I prefer a soft easy stroke. Easy, easier and easiest.

MAC
07-22-2008, 01:07 PM
Im guessing because I do have a soft stroke. I really do not know why he suggested that for sure but he is alot better than me and I trust his judgement. If anyone else may know why or have suggestions I would like to hear the reasoning.

1Time
07-23-2008, 12:57 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: MAC</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Im guessing because I do have a soft stroke. I really do not know why he suggested that for sure but he is alot better than me and I trust his judgement. If anyone else may know why or have suggestions I would like to hear the reasoning. </div></div>
You probably don't have a cue with a true wood to wood joint, which is a joint made entirely of wood. So this reasoning applies somewhat less to you and your cue. As I understand it, a wood to wood joint is reputed to provide a better feel for how hard the cue ball has been struck. A soft stroke relies more on cue ball speed for controlling it than a harder stroke. It follows that a wood to wood joint is a better match for a soft stroke.

There's no guarantee a cue with a wood to wood joint would shoot better for anyone than some other cue with another kind of joint. It's best to shoot with a cue and compare it to others before buying.

MAC
07-23-2008, 07:23 AM
All may be true, but I do know my cue IS a wood to wood joint. This much I do know.

1Time
07-23-2008, 09:00 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: MAC</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All may be true, but I do know my cue IS a wood to wood joint. This much I do know. </div></div>
You're right, wood to wood usually refers to wood components in each half of the joint that meet together, which is different than an all wood joint.

KellyStick
07-23-2008, 11:12 AM
1time, I have a hard time buying the wood to wood joint helps with feeling the softer stroke and it therefore better. By the time you feel the hit the stroke is over and CB speed is already what it is. I don't see how wood to wood and better feel would help.

I guess this could be cumulative knowledge but you can get that from any type stick based on feel and stroke speed and the visual results. Don't mean to be argumentative but I am having trouble with this explanation.

Perhaps maybe I just need to get me one and check it out though. Just cuz it don't make sense in my brain doesn't mean it's not true.

1Time
07-28-2008, 03:20 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: KellyStick</div><div class="ubbcode-body">1time, I have a hard time buying the wood to wood joint helps with feeling the softer stroke and it therefore better. By the time you feel the hit the stroke is over and CB speed is already what it is. I don't see how wood to wood and better feel would help.

I guess this could be cumulative knowledge but you can get that from any type stick based on feel and stroke speed and the visual results. Don't mean to be argumentative but I am having trouble with this explanation.
</div></div>
I am sure you're not alone in doubting this explanation. That's just how I understand it. The proof is in whether a wood joint matters to a particular player. I certainly would not recommend making a cue purchase based on or against this explanation. Rather, I recommend choosing a cue based on shooting with it first and comparing it to others.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: KellyStick</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Perhaps maybe I just need to get me one and check it out though. Just cuz it don't make sense in my brain doesn't mean it's not true. </div></div>
Some players may find it true for them while others don't. I generally prefer a steel jointed cue, but that wouldn't stop me from shooting with a wood jointed cue if I found one that played better for me.

JJFSTAR
07-28-2008, 01:20 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: crow4435</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> did i do right or should i have just bought a more expensive cue for myself? the 4 i got with the table were ok and the other 8 were for house cues. i'm just wondering if i sold myself short for a personal cue. </div></div>

Crow4435 the cost of the cue has absolutely no bearing on its playability for you. One of the better players on my team uses a $10 Kmart special. I once asked Andy what he played with because this older guy was one of the best on my team, his answer a $10 Kmart special. I was stunned I said “really?” his response “yea you don’t need no fancy stick you need practice”.

Efren Reyes played most of his career with a $13 cue he was for years offered custom cues that would cost others thousands of dollars. These cue makers offered them to him so that they could claim that Efren plays with one of theirs. His answer was “thank you very much, but I like playing with this one” while holding a $13 cue in his hand. Although watching the world cup in Rodderdam. The cue he was using looked too new to be that $13 number or maybe he just got a new shaft not sure but not really that important. And it certainly isn’t the reason he missed that 6 ball in the corner.

It doesn’t matter if it cost $15, $150 or $1500 what do these cues play like for you? When you shoot with more expensive cues do they feel better? If they don’t then you did it right. If they do then you need to go get yourself a more expensive cue pronto.