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Michael Shaw
08-18-2008, 08:36 AM
Hi
I have a question:
Whats the best cue for a begginer?

JJFSTAR
08-18-2008, 08:48 AM
Skill level is irrelevant from beginner to pro it is whatever feels the best to you. I personally think that you will usually get a little better deal from an independent cue salesman but you will get to try out more cues from your local billiard supply store. The best advice I can give you is this TRY LOTS AND LOTS OF CUES.

DeadCrab
08-18-2008, 09:05 AM
This question comes up a lot. For under $125 you can get a decent Players, McDermott, or Lucasi.

If you don't have a local pro shop, try on-line sites like Nielson's billiards, Ozone billiards, or billiards warehouse.

zombiemodder
08-18-2008, 09:12 AM
McDermott try ebay for some really good deals thats were i got mine.

1Time
08-18-2008, 09:39 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Michael Shaw</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hi
I have a question:
Whats the best cue for a begginer? </div></div>
A house cue.

New2Pool
08-18-2008, 11:15 AM
I am a beginner as well. I don't live in an area where there are any pool retailers close and I did not have any friends who I knew played pool. So in my case I was making a somewhat blind decision.

I shot with house cues until I figured out what weight I preferred. As a beginner you would not think that a couple of ounces would make a different but it does.

Once I figured out the weight I went for an entry level stick at a great price from a major brand. In my case it was McDermott because I found one on clearance for under $100. There were Lucasi and Viking cues available for about the same price but the McDermott warranty was appealing to me. I have really enjoyed the McDermott but I suspect that if I would have gotten a different brand of cue I would have liked it just as much.

Take some lessons and get a dependable stroke that you can count on to hit the ball the same way every time. Then practice and get good with the cue you are using. As you practice and pool becomes more a part of your life you will people who play pool and you will be able to hit with other sticks more. But until your stroke is OK it is tough to know whether the problem is the cue or if you are just happen to be doing something that works different from normal that day.

It is likely that you will find a new cue that you like well before you get to the point where a decent cue is slowing you down. I recently upgraded to a much "better" cue. It hits great and I love it. But I still like my McDermott and I play with it some as well.

So if you can try a lot of cues then that is the way to go. If not, I think you are best served by getting something solid and inexpensive then take a few lessons and work on your stroke.

(For what it is worth, I bought a cheap Wal-Mart cue and it was not worth playing with even as a beginner. It was wood but it made a "pinging" sound on every shot a vibrated like a tuning fork. I do think it is worth the money to get cue by a reputable manufacturer or custom cue maker. But there is no need overthinking it if you are still learning because you are still developing your style.

Rich R.
08-18-2008, 12:42 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1Time</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Michael Shaw</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hi
I have a question:
Whats the best cue for a begginer? </div></div>
A house cue. </div></div>
Based on the condition of house cues in most pool rooms, they are a bad choice. Most are not straight and they have lousy tips on them. Once you are to the point where you want to play on a regular basis, I recommend you buy your own cue.

Michael, for a beginner, I would recommend any inexpensive cue that is straight and feels good in your hands. As you play more and improve, try other cues. You will know when it is time to make a change or step up.

1Time
08-19-2008, 01:53 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rich R.</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1Time</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Michael Shaw</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hi
I have a question:
Whats the best cue for a begginer? </div></div>
A house cue. </div></div>
Based on the condition of house cues in most pool rooms, they are a bad choice. Most are not straight and they have lousy tips on them. Once you are to the point where you want to play on a regular basis, I recommend you buy your own cue.

Michael, for a beginner, I would recommend any inexpensive cue that is straight and feels good in your hands. As you play more and improve, try other cues. You will know when it is time to make a change or step up.
</div></div>
A reasonable argument can be made either way, especially if the available house cues are in shambles. I was running racks with house cues in a run down bar many years ago before buying my first cue, a Dufferin sneaky pete. And many of these house cues were in pretty bad shape. However, the house cues at the 3 pool halls that I currently frequent are in very good condition, one with Cuetec cues.

I prefer advising the use of house cues because this gives the beginner time to develop some preferences while learning the basics. The last thing a beginner would want to do is buy a cue only to find problems with it like warping and that they don't shoot better with it than the house cues. That happened to me, and it's happened to members who have posted about it in this forum. It probably happens to many beginners.

Far more beneficial for a beginner than differences between house cues and their own cue is getting pool lessons. A beginner will learn how to shoot pool far better and faster with a house cue and pool lessons than with their own cue and no lessons.

Rich R.
08-19-2008, 06:56 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1Time</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Far more beneficial for a beginner than differences between house cues and their own cue is getting pool lessons. A beginner will learn how to shoot pool far better and faster with a house cue and pool lessons than with their own cue and no lessons. </div></div>
Although getting lessons is an excellent suggestion, that is totally off topic for this discussion. The question was, "What is the best cue for a beginner?".

IMHO, your recommendation of house cues is only good if the house where you play has good quality cues. In most pool rooms, house cues are already warped and in very bad condition.
I think an inexpensive cue, $100 or less, is a better choice because it provides consistency to the beginner. It will be straight and they can get the tip of their choice, or a tip based on the recommendations of friends. They can also maintain it and keep it in good condition.
I also wouldn't assume the inexpensive cue will warp quickly. I have several in this price range, for house cues, and all are as straight as the day I bought them. After all, price doesn't mean that a cue won't warp. It can happen to the most expensive of cues.
BTW, buying a cue for $100 or less shouldn't affect someones budget so much that they couldn't afford to take a couple of lessons, as you suggested.

av84fun
08-19-2008, 01:54 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Michael Shaw</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hi
I have a question:
Whats the best cue for a begginer? </div></div>

Most but certainly not all "house cues" are a poor idea..even for the purpose of experimenting with preferred weights. That is because their weights are often poorly distributed.

I have stroked good quality cues that weigh a full ounce more than a house cue but "feel" much lighter when stroked.

The other issue with most house cues is their tips which often are either junk or poorly maintained or both.

I would MOST STRONGLY recommend a low deflection cue. I don't want to start YET ANOTHER debate on that subject, but cue stick induced deflection or "squirt" which causes the CB to travel in a direction opposite of the side of the cue ball that is struck by the cue tip, is an IMPORTANT variable.

IMHO, especially for new players...to reduce such a variable as squirt as is the case with L/D cues is a no-brainer.

If money isn't TOO much of an object, I would seriously consider an entry level CueTec cue for a couple of hundred dollars.

If the new player decideds to stick with the game, then a new cue would be unnecessariy except for the "furniture" aspect of cues and will retain its resale value much better than a below $100 cue that may not have much, if any, resale value.

I have no involvement with CueTec...but Allison Fisher plays with a STOCK CueTec and seems to have done fairly will with it!

(-:

Regards,
Jim

PRQL8R
08-21-2008, 09:04 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Michael Shaw</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Whats the best cue for a begginer? </div></div>

When I ran a billiard club at the high school I taught at, I was able to buy cues sold in lots of from 5 to 20 cues at a time from Aska Cue on Ebay. These cues usually sold for from $60 to $80 individually but by buying them in lots I was able to get them for as little as $25 each. I was then able to pass them on to my students at that price.

Although admitedly a low level jointed entry cue I was still impressed with the overall quality and hit of the cue. The kids were thrilled with them and the ones that went on to become mere serious players eventually went on to purchase a more quality playing cue and were then able to use the beginning cue as a pretty good break cue once I put a phenolic tip on for them.

If you also have some friends interested in getting into pool this might be a good option for you. Not to mention you could then put together your own league team /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif ...BOB