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SpiderMan
09-05-2008, 03:46 PM
I've always preferred 8-ball, for the seemingly "best" balance of offense, defense, and strategy. Lately I've been playing in a weekly 9-ball tournament, mainly because I have friends (Spetty and a few others) also participating in the same event. Don't know if it's just coincidence, but I now seem to be winning less at a weekly 8-ball tourney where I'm a long-time regular. Of course I'm getting better at 9-ball, a game I've never really cared for, but I'm thinking that I may want to back off as my fall 8-ball league approaches.

Years ago I played in a BCA league that used a summer (short season) 9-ball format and a fall/winter/spring (long season) 8-ball format. In order to glean a few more weeks of play, the league management always seemed to start the 9-ball league a few weeks before we headed to 'Vegas for the 8-ball nationals. This annoyed me greatly, as it didn't seem like a good idea to "break training" and get into a brain-dead shotmaker's game when I really needed to be peaking my performance at a thinking man's game.

Any other 8-ball players feel like 9-ball is an opiate to your main-game skills? Do you think that too much 9-ball (where the table generally gets easier as the rack progresses) gets in the way of a finely-honed 8-ball brain?

SpiderMan

Eric.
09-05-2008, 04:16 PM
So...do you like 8 ball or 9 ball better? /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif

IMO, one game doesn't have too much adverse effect on the other, assuming you fully understand both games well. I find the more demanding shotmaking of 9 ball helps me make sure I don't make the most common amateur mistakes; missing shots. I also like the kicking aspect of 9 ball, something that comes up much less frequently in 8 ball. I think, provided that your 8 ball patterns are strong (your 8 ball knowledge should not go down cuz you played a different game), and you don't become too aggressive (trying to run out every rack), then you should be able to switch back and forth easily.


Eric

SpiderMan
09-05-2008, 04:28 PM
9-ball has finally started providing a little weekly allowance, but I still like 8-ball much better. I really enjoy the choices, the breakouts, the planning, the more precise position play, and the fact than everyone sees a different table.

SpiderMan

Rich R.
09-05-2008, 05:27 PM
Spider, I'm a firm believer that playing different games helps all games. In this case, playing 9 ball will help your 8 ball game and vise versa. Personally, I'll play any game whenever I get the opportunity.
Rather than incorporating the skills from both games in your arsenal of weapons for both games, you may be thinking your way down a bad path. Stop over thinking the different games and just play. Use the skills you have with both games.

Fran Crimi
09-05-2008, 05:35 PM
Sounds like guilt. J/K, well sort of but you may be feeling you should be playing more 8-Ball instead of 9-Ball and that alone can throw your game off. I think at your level you should be able to switch back and forth pretty easily unless you're playing one game substantially more than the other.

Fran

New2Pool
09-06-2008, 08:16 AM
What is this "strategy" thing you speak of? /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif

Cornerman
09-06-2008, 08:28 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: SpiderMan</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Any other 8-ball players feel like 9-ball is an opiate to your main-game skills? Do you think that too much 9-ball (where the table generally gets easier as the rack progresses) gets in the way of a finely-honed 8-ball brain?

SpiderMan </div></div>I don't feel that way. There are several aspects of 8-ball that can be improved by the play of other games. 14.1 is obvious, but I became a better 8-ball player for sure after playing a lot more 9-ball. 9-ball brings a wider range of shotmaking patterns more often than 8-ball does. And more options leads to better options as your skill improves.

I see it a lot when the opponent has missed after putting a lot of his balls in, and the resultant layout can be shot from a normal 8-ball point of view, or shot wioth some more typical 9-ball type patterns. And often, the 9-ball patterns will make the runout easier depending on how the balls lay.

Fred

Bambu
09-06-2008, 09:05 AM
Too much of any game sort of puts me in that games mode. Sometimes it takes a few games to re-adjust to the different style. Not to change the topic, but I think if you played more 9 ball, you might change your mind in chalking it up to be a brain dead shotmakers game. I also dont see how 9 ball gets any easier than 8 ball as the rack progresses. There are more blocking balls to deal with in 8 ball, but each rack seems too random to make that kind of suggestion. Rack for rack, 8 ball seems a little easier to me because there are less power shots, more choices of balls to shoot, and a wider range of possible safeties.

Deeman3
09-08-2008, 07:23 AM
Played properly, 8 ball tends to be a more gentle game in that you don't have as many forced power shots. If I play a lot of nine ball the only tendency i seem to get playing straight pool one pocket or 8 ball is not backing down and hitting my shots, like one should, as softly as possible to achieve the shot and position. Otherwise, it should not effect you much.

BigRigTom
09-08-2008, 08:04 AM
I agree with Deeman. As long as you sink the shot and get position you are still shooting. The problems usually occur when you miss.

If you are using too much power and stroke those misses can result in a much bigger problem in 8 ball, one pocket or 14.1 than in 9 ball where your opponent has to shoot at the same ball you just missed.

I personally have found that playing 9 ball help me get into stroke and my position play is much better in 8 ball after I have shot a few racks of 9 ball.

To each his own here though because you do have to take it down a notch when switching from 9 ball to 8 ball. Eight ball is a great "pocket speed" game then if you miss you are leaving yourself a duck while possibly blocking the pocket for you opponent.

Sid_Vicious
09-08-2008, 08:05 AM
Here's my take, by past experience. I like most grew up on 8B many years back, never really saw 9B played back then like you do today. Once I hit Dallas, I came to find 9B and prefer it, so I basically played almost no 8B for a few years compared to 9B. A friend of mine and I got into a scotch doubles tournament, it was 8B, and to me, the 8B game snapped right back-in, softer hits, safeties instantly made sense, etc. IMO, 9B, if anything, gave me a new stroke when needed for CB distance. Main thing I'm saying is that most all have the 8B game imbedded into memory, and it will always be there. The only game I can say is detrimental to any another game, is 1 pocket. That game's f-d with several 9-ballers stroke.

8&9 though are not negative for one another. jm2c...sid

SpiderMan
09-08-2008, 10:58 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Too much of any game sort of puts me in that games mode. Sometimes it takes a few games to re-adjust to the different style. Not to change the topic, but I think if you played more 9 ball, you might change your mind in chalking it up to be a brain dead shotmakers game. I also dont see how 9 ball gets any easier than 8 ball as the rack progresses. There are more blocking balls to deal with in 8 ball, but each rack seems too random to make that kind of suggestion. Rack for rack, 8 ball seems a little easier to me because there are less power shots, more choices of balls to shoot, and a wider range of possible safeties. </div></div>

I wasn't saying that the 9-ball rack is typically easier to run, only that it's difficulty decreases as balls are pocketed, which is sort of the opposite of 8-ball. Personally, I find it easier to run a rack of 8-ball because the initial choices allow for more discretion in planning.

But in 9-ball, you can abort and play a decent safety when you're near the end of a runout, because your opponent still only has one legal ball. In 8-ball, running six from the break and then trying to duck when your opponent still has a table full of targets is usually a script for loss.

I think that's where the 9-ball mindset hurts in 8-ball. I've beaten a lot of players at 8-ball, who would be out of my league otherwise, because their 9-ball conditioning leads them to push unwise runout attempts too deeply into the rack. Somewhere in the back of their minds, they are accustomed to being able to get away with late-game safeties.

SpiderMan

SpiderMan
09-08-2008, 11:04 AM
Tom, that's a point well made.

In 8-ball, pocket speed and a near miss are sometimes non-fatal, while in 9-ball leaving the ball jawed will generally get your opponent's runout started.

In 9-ball, you need to play your shots such that a miss doesn't leave anything hanging. For example, I'm getting a habit of playing short cross-banks to the corner a little thin, so if it misses I will leave the OB on the short rail and my opponent looking at a tough bank. If I missed a little thick, he would likely see an easier cut as his next shot. This is basically the opposite of 8-ball thinking, and it is something that 9-ball players become automatically conditioned to d

SpiderMan

Bambu
09-08-2008, 12:29 PM
I understand what youre saying spider, and you always make good points. And I agree, the strategy is entirely different. I suppose the game you play the most will yield more runouts. But I play much more 9 ball, and run out just as often playing 8 ball. I know what you are saying about difficulty decreasing in 9 ball, but thats only regarding possible blocking balls. Shot for shot, 9 ball requires more power, distance, and english to get to the next ball. 8 ball is more of a soft style, connect the dots type game. To me, thats more of a shotmakers game. In 8 ball, you can sometimes get away with using just the vertical cue ball axis. In 9 ball you would have to have lots of luck, or world class control for that to happen. Come to the dark side, Spider! Sooner or later, you are going to embrace the wonderful game of big table 9 ball.


<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: SpiderMan</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Too much of any game sort of puts me in that games mode. Sometimes it takes a few games to re-adjust to the different style. Not to change the topic, but I think if you played more 9 ball, you might change your mind in chalking it up to be a brain dead shotmakers game. I also dont see how 9 ball gets any easier than 8 ball as the rack progresses. There are more blocking balls to deal with in 8 ball, but each rack seems too random to make that kind of suggestion. Rack for rack, 8 ball seems a little easier to me because there are less power shots, more choices of balls to shoot, and a wider range of possible safeties. </div></div>

I wasn't saying that the 9-ball rack is typically easier to run, only that it's difficulty decreases as balls are pocketed, which is sort of the opposite of 8-ball. Personally, I find it easier to run a rack of 8-ball because the initial choices allow for more discretion in planning.

But in 9-ball, you can abort and play a decent safety when you're near the end of a runout, because your opponent still only has one legal ball. In 8-ball, running six from the break and then trying to duck when your opponent still has a table full of targets is usually a script for loss.

I think that's where the 9-ball mindset hurts in 8-ball. I've beaten a lot of players at 8-ball, who would be out of my league otherwise, because their 9-ball conditioning leads them to push unwise runout attempts too deeply into the rack. Somewhere in the back of their minds, they are accustomed to being able to get away with late-game safeties.

SpiderMan</div></div>

Deeman3
09-08-2008, 12:39 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sid_Vicious</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Main thing I'm saying is that most all have the 8B game imbedded into memory, and it will always be there. <span style="color: #FF0000">Of course, many who have 8 ball "imbedded" in their memory may have it completely wrong. </span> The only game I can say is detrimental to any another game, is 1 pocket. That game's f-d with several 9-ballers stroke. <span style="color: #FF0000">

I feel this part is only true if the player's stroke was not very good in the first place. Players screw up strokes, not the games they are playing.</span>

</div></div>

SpiderMan
09-08-2008, 01:50 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I understand what youre saying spider, and you always make good points. And I agree, the strategy is entirely different. I suppose the game you play the most will yield more runouts. But I play much more 9 ball, and run out just as often playing 8 ball. I know what you are saying about difficulty decreasing in 9 ball, but thats only regarding possible blocking balls. Shot for shot, 9 ball requires more power, distance, and english to get to the next ball. 8 ball is more of a soft style, connect the dots type game. To me, thats more of a shotmakers game. In 8 ball, you can sometimes get away with using just the vertical cue ball axis. In 9 ball you would have to have lots of luck, or world class control for that to happen. Come to the dark side, Spider! Sooner or later, you are going to embrace the wonderful game of big table 9 ball.


<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: SpiderMan</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Too much of any game sort of puts me in that games mode. Sometimes it takes a few games to re-adjust to the different style. Not to change the topic, but I think if you played more 9 ball, you might change your mind in chalking it up to be a brain dead shotmakers game. I also dont see how 9 ball gets any easier than 8 ball as the rack progresses. There are more blocking balls to deal with in 8 ball, but each rack seems too random to make that kind of suggestion. Rack for rack, 8 ball seems a little easier to me because there are less power shots, more choices of balls to shoot, and a wider range of possible safeties. </div></div>

I wasn't saying that the 9-ball rack is typically easier to run, only that it's difficulty decreases as balls are pocketed, which is sort of the opposite of 8-ball. Personally, I find it easier to run a rack of 8-ball because the initial choices allow for more discretion in planning.

But in 9-ball, you can abort and play a decent safety when you're near the end of a runout, because your opponent still only has one legal ball. In 8-ball, running six from the break and then trying to duck when your opponent still has a table full of targets is usually a script for loss.

I think that's where the 9-ball mindset hurts in 8-ball. I've beaten a lot of players at 8-ball, who would be out of my league otherwise, because their 9-ball conditioning leads them to push unwise runout attempts too deeply into the rack. Somewhere in the back of their minds, they are accustomed to being able to get away with late-game safeties.

SpiderMan</div></div> </div></div>

Sounds like we're both in agreement on which is easier/harder to run from the break. But I don't consider 8-ball so much a game favoring shotmakers - it's more a game for position players because of the clutter.

SpiderMan

Ace
09-08-2008, 03:46 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sid_Vicious</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Here's my take, by past experience. I like most grew up on 8B many years back, never really saw 9B played back then like you do today. Once I hit Dallas, I came to find 9B and prefer it, so I basically played almost no 8B for a few years compared to 9B. A friend of mine and I got into a scotch doubles tournament, it was 8B, and to me, the 8B game snapped right back-in, softer hits, safeties instantly made sense, etc. IMO, 9B, if anything, gave me a new stroke when needed for CB distance. Main thing I'm saying is that most all have the 8B game imbedded into memory, and it will always be there. The only game I can say is detrimental to any another game, is 1 pocket.<span style="color: #FF0000"> ??????? </span>That game's f-d with several 9-ballers stroke.

8&9 though are not negative for one another. jm2c...sid </div></div>


<span style="color: #FF0000"><span style="color: #FF0000"> </span> I play alot of 1 Pocket lately and I feel if anything it has helped all my other games including 8-ball and 9-ball. 1-Pocket allows me to practice slow and deliberate strokes as well as all the safety play involved. Another game, everyone may think is a waste of time, I play is reverse (Philadelphia - shooting the object ball off the c-ball as a carrom shot and pocketing the object ball). This game helps me practice leaving the object ball, or c-ball in other games, exactly where I want it. So, I think all games will in some way help each other.</span>

SpiderMan
09-08-2008, 04:43 PM
Off the subject, Ace, but did you receive the Winstar tournament photos I sent you a few months ago? I used the email address off your card, but never got a reply.

SpiderMan

Ace
09-08-2008, 07:43 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: SpiderMan</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Off the subject, Ace, but did you receive the Winstar tournament photos I sent you a few months ago? I used the email address off your card, but never got a reply.

SpiderMan </div></div>

Yes, the pictures were great. Sorry no reply, I don't have much of an excuse. I am not on the CCB all the time and I have really been busy. The pics are very much appreciated.

Rod
09-08-2008, 11:38 PM
I don't think my brain has ever been that finely honed. LOL
Hi Marty, To answer, I say if you play as much as I think you play it should not be a problem. I imagine you still play a fair amount of 8 ball. Use the experience from each game to better the other.

Years ago my best games was 14-1, Golf on a 12 footer, and 9 ball. Since I played a lot and played a fair amount of each it never took long to adapt to the other. Not to say I didn't play all games good but those were my favorite games.

Personally I think players in the long run will keep adding to their bag of tricks by playing more games. There are shots that get overlooked simply because the player didn't see or know them. Like I say in the long run It makes you a better player. However, I understand where your comming from. Especially the part of playing 9 ball league before Vegas. I think that was not the best idea from the room but it happend. Just focus more on 8 ball before Vegas and I think it will all fall into place.

Rod

Sid_Vicious
09-09-2008, 08:05 AM
"I feel this part is only true if the player's stroke was not very good in the first place. Players screw up strokes, not the games they are playing."



Well, I watched several proficient 9-ball players get addicted to 1P, to only develop a stunted and what I call a 1P Poke Style Stroke. It bled right into their 9B game once league started after coming off of the nines while playing 1P. Better and more seasoned players than myself, including one of the players themselves, commented exactly the same thing...1P influences negatively on the 9-ball game. Id say their 9-B strokes were before playing relentless 1P, ranked A+ players normally in 9B. IMO, there was many times a 1-2 ball diminishment after a lot of 1P before 9B...sid

Deeman3
09-09-2008, 08:36 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sid_Vicious</div><div class="ubbcode-body">"I feel this part is only true if the player's stroke was not very good in the first place. Players screw up strokes, not the games they are playing."



Well, I watched several proficient 9-ball players get addicted to 1P, to only develop a stunted and what I call a 1P Poke Style Stroke. It bled right into their 9B game once league started after coming off of the nines while playing 1P. Better and more seasoned players than myself, including one of the players themselves, commented exactly the same thing...1P influences negatively on the 9-ball game. Id say their 9-B strokes were before playing relentless 1P, ranked A+ players normally in 9B. IMO, there was many times a 1-2 ball diminishment after a lot of 1P before 9B...sid </div></div>


<span style="color: #FF0000">Well, Sid, we will just have to disagree on this one. It may, as I said, be that they were just not consistent in the first place but if you say they are all A+ players, I don't have much argument for that. I would argue that at least once a year, the very best nine ball players in the world gather at Derby City and play days of one pocket before switching overnight, to almost all nine ball and I have yet to see the results you speak of. They go from playing mixes of moving and shooting to runout nine ball without missing a beat. In most cases the same guys who finish high in one pocket finish near the top in nine ball. </span>

SpiderMan
09-09-2008, 09:29 AM
Hi Rod, thanks for replying. I haven't talked to you for a while, and was not sure you still hung out here.

I seem to be getting better at 9-ball - I've won the Clicks weekly tournament a few times, and I'm now giving most of the other guys one on the wire. Not kidding myself any, though - it's obviously a small pond with few sharks. But I think I'd probably be an "8" now if your friend Rick re-rated me. How's he doing these days?

Surprisingly, at least to me, is the fact that I seem to be winning a lot of games on early 9-balls. I contrast that with the pro videos I watch, where they usually seem to end the game by completely clearing the table. Do you notice this as a trend, higher-level players running out more than average, while intermediates combo or carom the 9-ball a little more often? I'm not talking about luck or "giving it a ride", but planned and aimed early nines.\

Maybe I'll start another thread with this question.

SpiderMan

MAC
09-09-2008, 10:21 AM
I try to have someone stop by the house after work atleast once of not two or three times a week to shoot pool and wind down a little after working all day. We always play 8 ball and 9 ball, race to seven in each. This is the only time I play 9 ball and I have found it helps me out with my position play with the cueball.

DickLeonard
09-09-2008, 10:28 AM
Spiderman I usually don't post over here but I will tell this story. I played Toby Sweet nineball in a room in Troy I wanted to play him straight pool but he wouldn't play me. We went around and around finally I said I am not playing you nineball.

I went to the counter and ordered a coffee and the nite club owner from next door wanted to see some pool action, he had never seen a pool game for money. Come I'll back you he said I just want to see the action. The game was on thirty dollars a game. Toby's break was dominate he was putting the nineball in on the break and I wasn't making a ball.

Finally when I won a game I played a safe break leaving the cueball on the end rail and the one hidden. One shot shoot out so I had the choice of the shot. If I gave Toby the shot he still had to run nine balls in the lower half of the table. Now instead of playing him nineball I was playing him straight pool. This method overcame his strong break. When the game broke up I was down 12 games. Mainly due to his 9,9 balls on the break.

Most nineball players are used to playing a spread out game, confine to a short space and it is a different story.####

JJFSTAR
09-09-2008, 11:07 AM
I am probably preaching to the choir here because from what I have read most people on this board who post a lot are at least as skilled as I am if not more. 9B is the game that I see played the worst out of all games that are commonly played. In 8B I have seen some pretty mediocre players play some nice safeties and beautiful break shots.

In contrast 9B is played pretty stupidly by a great many players who tout themselves as experts. 9B has a beauty that is all its own just like my 3 other favorite pool games that I like equally, the others being 8B, Strait and One Pocket.

9B in particular I see more fantastic shots and blown runs than in any other game. Even some guy’s who are experts reduce the poor game to what I call “try to run the table” and that is a better game than “try to make to OB” but it is not good pool. This usually happens to sharks after they have had a few beers and are playing 9B everything is try to run out or sink that game ball.

So will 9B hurt your game? Well yes if you don’t walk around the table, use your full pre-shot routine and look at it with the same deep and objective analysis that you do any other rack. If you “play it right” it should improve your control of the CB when lots of traveling is required and shouldn’t damage any other aspect of your game. But if you “play it wrong” well you will find that it will torpedo your game almost immediately.

This isn’t to say that you guy’s are playing it wrong as a matter of fact this post isn’t really addressed to guy’s like Bambu and Spiderman more to the guy’s who are within their first 5 or 10 years of competitive play.

Rod
09-10-2008, 02:46 AM
Marty, I cruise by once in a while. Ricks doing fine as far as I know (haven't seen him for a while)and owns a bar now.

Yes the trend would be as you say. IMO most higher rated players know combination's can be missed. As opposed to running out a wide open table. If they miss an equal player either pockets the jawed 9, runs out or has control of the table. If a table is tied up it may favor taking the combination.

At an intermediate level players may not be sure they can run out, so they tend to take more combination's. Another factor is if they miss they may still get back to the table.

In either case it boils down to player confidence and I think percentages. If I think say 9 out of ten I'll make the combination or run out I'll take the combination. If I think say 7 of ten on the combination and 9 of ten on the run out then you know which direction I'll take. I know there is more doubt on the combination rather than the run out. You just have to weigh the factors involved, no matter the level, to make the smartest choice.

Rod

Chopstick
09-11-2008, 08:50 AM
You just aren't used to it. Keep playing. It will even out after a while. In the APA power league here they play the US Amateur format. Half 8 ball and half 9 ball. I do notice a difference in some players where they will be much better at one or the other. I think it has a lot to do with attitude. My preference is to be tough at both. Just go knock all the balls off and don't worry about it.

Sid_Vicious
09-11-2008, 01:32 PM
Actually Dee, you are correct in this, meaning that an A+ here compared to your rated A+ crew at Derby City ain't the same. I also concede another point, and that is that many of the tainted strokes I've seen coming off of the 9 fooyers in 1P, to a league match, are somewhat "learning 1-P players." I suppose this relates to Spiderman's original question about strategy with different games. Much of 1-P is shooting AT YOUR HOLE rather than for the ball to drop, and a tedious amount of defense of your half of the table. Some similiarities to 8B, hardy any to 9B IMO, plus there is the shortened stroke style in 1P since the work is mostly around the end where the two holes reside, and controlling the CB is mainly a stop shot lots of times after clearing out a hole.

I don't totally disagree with you on the veteran 1P players between different games. It is just something that I notice when a locally talented 8B or 9B player picks up 1P, that they stagger, miss, and hang balls they never would, had they played 8/9B for the past 4 hours instead of the new addiction of learning/honing skills in 1P.

Like I said, the "talent pool" for A+, A, B, and even C players is a lot different between areas of the country, certainly Derby City, We're just country folk down here ;-), but several'a dez boys can play about any game without any hitches...sid

Sid_Vicious
09-11-2008, 01:45 PM
"You just aren't used to it."

There is more to this statement than what's on the surface. I know Spiderman a little, he can be really protective of his 8B skills, almost to the point of being a little tunnel-visioned against 9B. A lot of the deal is in the attitude ahead of time for both games. If I move from a session of 9B to then playing 8B, it's easy for me to gear down the speed and read the walls for safeties, find the trouble balls, early and then play differently. 9B skills mostly help in the switch by giving me a more natural talent for playing 2-way shots in 8B, since I'm used to playing shape on a particular ball following a made ball.

Nuff of my soap box speeches, it is really all about your mindset of being against(protective), rather than neutral, about a different game such as 9B. This could possibly hurt an intense 8B player's strategy, where there's a lot of importance on small motions and working progressive patterns. In my opinion, it is minimal if at all...sid

supergreenman
09-12-2008, 04:28 PM
I have to agree with you on this. 9 ball can hurt your 8ball game. I think the major reason is with 8ball you have to play tighter position a lot of times especially if you're a table runner. 9 ball is more zone position so the tendency is to hit the CB harder.

Ball by numbers takes away the ceribal part of picking your patterns because you're limited on the number of routes you can take to your next ball.

I'm sure others will disagree with me but that's how I see it.