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skin
09-05-2008, 09:39 PM
So, here's your situation.

You have just lined up a shot and are down in the pre-shot aiming. Suddenly, the bright idea crosses your mind to change the shot. Do you?

A. Ignore the idea and keep with your original plan
B. Stand up and re-evaluate
C. Make an adjustment while you are down and shoot the new shot


I know what happens when you chose C. It costs me everytime I do it.

JoeW
09-05-2008, 09:54 PM
Depends on where the idea comes from.

The subconscious mind has a better ability to determine that what you want to do may have a low probability of success.

If the "idea" is a feeling in your gut that this isn't quite what you expected then you should stand up and re-evaluate.

That fuzzy, quasy feeling is that someone inside you, you know the guy you can't lie to, telling you that this will not work or there is better way.

Some people have learned to be sensitive to the idea that a shot is more difficult than it appears and they get another kind of "idea." So it depends on how in tune you are with your own sub-conscious.

Men tend to think that "intuition" is a feminine quality -- it isn't. It is well known that some of the best corporate executives use their intuitition a great deal, for many things.

skin
09-05-2008, 10:24 PM
I agree, JoeW. The best course of action is to stand up and re-evaluate. Could be that intuition was correct the first time and it needs to be confirmed. Or, not.

Adjusting to a new plan while down is a bad idea. I think it accounts for a lot of missed shots.

zombiemodder
09-05-2008, 10:35 PM
I would have to say B thats what i always hear "iF YOU HAVE ANY DOUBT STAND UP AND THINK IT OVER"

Rich R.
09-06-2008, 06:44 AM
The best choice is, "B. Stand up and re-evaluate"

Now I have to train myself to make the best choice more often. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cry.gif

BigRigTom
09-06-2008, 09:06 AM
B is the correct choice...thus my mantra.
Think before you shoot and then shoot without thinking.

If you suddenly start thinking while you should be shooting you need to stand up and re-evaluate.

Now the hard part is to realize when that is happening and be able to actually stand back up......instead of taking a shot anyway.

bataisbest
09-06-2008, 12:13 PM
B. Stand up and look everything over again to make sure the new shot is what you really want to go for. I've done C before and yes, it does cost you when you do that.

JJFSTAR
09-06-2008, 12:57 PM
This question is as old as the hills and I agree with JoeW’s line of thinking on this one but I would take it a bit further. I used to just have the stock answer of B!!! of course! This is however been under review by me and my own game because today I have lots of tournament experience under my belt and so my 1st intuition is usually better than my second, meaning a second idea that comes up during the execution phase of the shot.

This “go with your first plan” has been working really well for me lately and also secondary ideas are one of the things that prevent me from going on autopilot meaning the shift into dead stroke.

To sum it all up without getting too complicated the decision as to which to do A (I would modify A and say “stand up and purge the idea and resume your execution phase afresh”) or B is circumstance sensitive. The “who, what, where and when” all come into play there and need to be considered, I like to do a secondary chalking of my stick when this happens to me. As for C if I had done less C in my 20’s I would be a better pool player than I am today. It is a mistake that we all make and that we rarely if ever get rid of completely. I have seen tens of thousands of dollars lost because of that single mistake.

Pro’s are not free of this either. Here is what I say about the separation between analysis and execution I wrote this many years ago so you will see it is my aforementioned “stock” answer B!!! but today I am doing more and more of a modified “A”. I wrote this in 1993. I have come so far as a teacher since then but hey they are good words for the intermediate player.

A pool shot has two parts: analysis and execution. DO NOT DO BOTH AT ONCE!!! Analyze IN A STANDING POSITION so that you have a birds eye view of the table. In the analysis stage, you observe the layout of the table and make a plan. The execution stage starts when you bend over the table and take that first address stroke. THE ANALYSIS STAGE IS OVER! If you catch yourself analyzing when you're executing stand up and start over.
This is an advanced mistake right up to the professional level. Do you best to separate the 2 stages.

1poolfan
09-07-2008, 09:46 AM
I would say it depends how often you are doing this.

If this is a rare occurrence then the answer is to take another look because you have nothing to lose.

But if this occurs often, then I would say your pre-shot routine is not working properly because you are probably rushing it. The answer then would be to work on your pre-shot routine as this would have nothing to do with any 'bright' ideas but has to do with second guessing yourself.

Qtec
09-07-2008, 11:39 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: skin</div><div class="ubbcode-body">So, here's your situation.

You have just lined up a shot and are down in the pre-shot aiming. Suddenly, the bright idea crosses your mind to change the shot. Do you?

A. Ignore the idea and keep with your original plan
B. Stand up and re-evaluate
C. Make an adjustment while you are down and shoot the new shot


I know what happens when you chose C. It costs me everytime I do it.
</div></div>

B is the only option. To play the shot with 100% conviction you have to have made a decision.

ie,
You decide what shot you will play.[ how hard and where you will strike the QB = spin]
You visualize yourself playing the shot and most important FEEL the shot, try and FEEL the way you are going to strike the QB.
Then you get down and just pot the ball.
The shape of the QB is already determined and if you hit it right, the QB can't go anywhere else than where you want it to go.

Qtec