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TomBrooklyn
08-14-2002, 04:31 PM
If one is properly addressing a shot, down, set and ready to shoot.... should they be able to close their eyes and make the shot?

If the shot goes off, does that mean one was not standing, positioned, or balanced properly, or not stroking properly?

08-14-2002, 05:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: TomBrooklyn:</font><hr> If one is properly addressing a shot, down, set and ready to shoot.... should they be able to close their eyes and make the shot?

If the shot goes wild, does that mean they were not standing, positioned, or balanced properly? <hr></blockquote>

Can't think why you would ask this, but if the persons stroke is solid; perfected through repetition, there's no reason to miss the shot. You should draw the cue back and forth as usual, even with your eyes closed. Of course the better the player, the more likely they are to make the shot.

Tom_In_Cincy
08-14-2002, 05:21 PM
You mean you are suppose to have them open?

I have often shot like I did have my eyes closed.. and have lined up a shot, and turned my head away.. looking in another direction and made a ball.. but never tried just closing them on purpose.. I'll try it out tonite, and let you know..

Karatemom
08-14-2002, 05:26 PM
IMO, yes. Chris had me do just this when I started shooting again. He said that it is muscle memory. If you are set with your stance, aim, etc., closing your eyes should not make a difference.

JMHO,

Heide

Doctor_D
08-14-2002, 05:29 PM
Good evening Tom:

This is a routine I use regularly with my practice drills. I align my shot, close my eyes taking Two (2) practice strokes and then shoot. If I am in-line and in-stroke, the shot will pocket.

Dr. D.

TonyM
08-14-2002, 10:28 PM
Tom asks:

"If one is properly addressing a shot, down, set and ready to shoot.... should they be able to close their eyes and make the shot?"

In a word, yes. When I am having a problem with my potting, I often will try and make the shot with my eyes closed. The result of this exercise tells me something valuable about what I am doing.

Consider:

Suppose you set-up a shot and are struggling to make it. Generally, the reasons for missing can be lumped into two basic categories:

1) you do not have the correct aim line
2) you have the correct aim line, but cannot deliver the cueball accurately

But how do you know which is which?

The basic answer is observation. I watch the cueball for any errant unintentional sidespin. I also watch the path to see if it curves, or squirts (unless that is what I wanted).

I also will experiment with looking at the cueball last. If I can make the shot by looking at the cueball last, then I likely have the correct line, but I'm not "trusting" it, or my head position is a little off and giving me a skewed perspective.

I'll use the eyes closed test to also tell me if my initial line was correct, and if I am stroking the ball straight.

If I can make the ball with my eyes closed, but not with my eyes open (it happens, and it is frustrating), then I know that my stroke is good, and that my line was likely o.k. to begin with.

Now if I miss the ball with my eyes closed, then I am either stroking funny, or my initial line was flawed. That's when I use the cueball last test. This tells me if my line was correct. If I miss the ball with a cueball last approach, then I am not likely lining up correctly to begin with.

I might line up the shot with one eye closed, and then open both eyes and see if the view changed. Or adjust my head position slightly left or right. Basically I make a small adjustment until the initial line up allows the ball to go into the hole.

"If the shot goes wild, does that mean they were not standing, positioned, or balanced properly?"

It could mean 1 of 2 things. Either you were not aligned to the shot correctly to begin with, or you did not stroke in a straight line.

To find out which, try the same shot with a cueball last approach (see above for explanation).

Many fine players have a hard time with making a shot with their eyes closed. They have got into the habit of making a last minute correction of the cue line "on the fly". By closing their eyes, they cannot do this, and so miss the shot.

A periodical check with your eyes closed can help prevent this bad habit from becomming ingrained.

Good luck!

Tony

08-15-2002, 10:19 AM
1)yes
2)yes
I first tried this when I first got my table at home and my kids were searching for an appropriate handicap. Except for long, thin cut shots I managed to do really well. I can close my eyes on the way down before my bridge hand hits the table. Next to a smooth, straight stroke I think addressing the the CB is the most important component of a shot.

Tom_In_Cincy
08-15-2002, 06:12 PM
Well I tried it last nite and didn't miss a ball. I did this after playing 4 sets of races to 5.

The guy I was playing commented that I must really "trust" what I am doing. That is exactly one of my pre-shot routine thoughts.. Trust what I am doing, Accept the results.. and make sure I use my pre-shot routine.

Good exercise.. I like it..