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Bob Janzen
12-03-2009, 04:35 PM
Probably been asked many times before.... but what do you prefer in the way of a cue cleaner, cue conditioner, etc.? I presume it would be different if you have a wood shaft vs. like a Cuetec (plastic?) shaft. And how often do you use said cleaner?

Cue silk? Q-glide? .....?
or just a paper towel or .... ?

Rich R.
12-03-2009, 08:29 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bob Janzen</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Probably been asked many times before.... but what do you prefer in the way of a cue cleaner, cue conditioner, etc.? I presume it would be different if you have a wood shaft vs. like a Cuetec (plastic?) shaft. And how often do you use said cleaner?

Cue silk? Q-glide? .....?
or just a paper towel or .... ? </div></div>
I prefer not to use any of the commercial cue cleaners or conditioners. Some contain silicone and silicone, although it may give the desired affect, is not really good for the wood.

IMHO, the best thing you can do for your cue is wipe it down with a damp paper towel, followed by a dry paper towel after each use. Chances are that you will still get some chalk build up over time. No more than twice per year I clean the shaft with the Mr. Clean Magic Eraser dampened with a minimum of water. Some prefer to use alcohol instead of the water. After cleaning with the Magic Eraser, I follow with a damp paper towel to remove any residue and then with a dry paper towel.

After cleaning, I use a Q-Whiz to smooth and burnish the shaft.

There are many other ways to keep your cue clean and smooth. This is just my method and it works for me. I'm sure others will have many other suggestions.

Bambu
12-03-2009, 08:34 PM
Rich, why only twice a year with the magic eraser? I have been using them probably every couple of weeks with no problems.

Paul_Mon
12-04-2009, 07:01 AM
Same here Rich. I burnish with leather and waxed paper after Mr. Clean.

regards........Paul

Lest we forget. We all owe Tommy T for first to use Mr. Clean.

JoeW
12-04-2009, 09:31 AM
I think if someone were to take a poll that Mr Clean has become the leading shaft cleaner by a wide margin.

After cleaning the polishing/ burnishing thing is more a matter of preference with many opinions pro and con.

I use it whenever the shafts are dirty. Around this time of year with many of my family home for the holidays that is every few weeks. Later in the year they get cleaned about every other month. I continue to have the odd person come to the house who has not used Mr Clean. I often clean their shaft for them and have an instant convert to the "new way."

Personally, I like to use a little alcohol after Mr Clean. Seems to take out any possible water that was left and leaves a slick surface.

However, It seems to me that I should use some sort of wax or something after the alcohol as the shaft appear to get dirty more quickly. Perhaps it is only the contrast between the Mr Clean, clean and the dirty. I don't know.

What do others use to "seal" the clean shaft? Is it needed? Does sealing keep that clean state for longer? Inquiring minds want to know.

Season's Greetings to all.

pooltchr
12-04-2009, 11:39 AM
Magic Eraser is a very mild abrasive, and does put microscopic scratches in the shaft. That's why the seem to start turning blue so quickly.

Steve

Rich R.
12-04-2009, 10:47 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Rich, why only twice a year with the magic eraser? I have been using them probably every couple of weeks with no problems. </div></div>
I really hate using any type of chemical on my cue shafts. When it comes to cleaning, I guess I'm a minimalist and I'm not one that needs a pristine shaft all of the time. I find that the use of the damp paper towel after playing keeps the shaft clean enough for me for quite a while. When the blue builds up, I break down and use the Magic Eraser.

Rich R.
12-04-2009, 11:07 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Paul_Mon</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Same here Rich. I burnish with leather and waxed paper after Mr. Clean.

regards........Paul

Lest we forget. We all owe Tommy T for first to use Mr. Clean. </div></div>
Paul, I really shy away from using any type of wax, including wax paper, on my cue shafts. IMHO, it is the wax that becomes sticky during use. When I obtain a new cue, I usually use a very light abrassive to remove any finish from the surface of the shaft that the maker may have applied. I believe enough finish remains in the pores of the wood to act as a sealer. After that, Ii never apply any type of wax.

Paul_Mon
12-05-2009, 03:01 PM
I don't seem to experience any problem using the waxed paper. First saw Dennis Hatch do it, But he used dollar billl and brown paper bag too. I wet my Mr. Clean with denatured alcohol. My ferrules don't come that clean, 314 shafts have very soft ferrule material. But the ferrule is not sliding in my hand either.

regards........Paul

Bambu
12-05-2009, 11:22 PM
I took a better look at it today. You're right Rich, its kinda blue and scratchy looking. I dont care so much though, as long as its smooth, not dirty.

Rich R.
12-06-2009, 09:37 AM
Bambu, it's all a matter of personal preference. Some like that pristine look of a new shaft. I've never been in that camp and I don't mind if my cue looks like it has been used.

Also, keep in mind that mine is not the only method. Some do not like to use any water on their shafts because it will tend to raise the grain a little and require more burnishing. Some prefer to us alcohol because it will not raise the grain. I have also heard of others using lighter fluid with good results, but I have never tried that and I don't plan on it.

Hopefully others will chime in with methods that they have been successful with and we may learn something new.

BillyJack
12-06-2009, 10:03 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Magic Eraser is a very mild abrasive, and does put microscopic scratches in the shaft. That's why the seem to start turning blue so quickly.

Steve </div></div>
Agreed. ME is a great cleaner since its microscopic "hooks" dig all the garbage out of the pores and irregularities of the wood, but without a reseal, they'll just attract more dirt and chalk.
Here's my method:
Clean thoroughly with a dampened ME pad. Wipe with 90% alcohol to dry. Wipe on two thin coats of either shellac-based sanding sealer, or thinned shellac, sanding between coats with 1000 grit paper or 2000 grit micro-mesh. Finish-sand with 2500 paper or 4000 micro-mesh. Follow with a polishing of brown bag paper. Weekly maintenance is just an alcohol wipe followed by polishing with brown paper. My shafts stay silky-smooth, nice and white with no blueing. I'll redo the ME and seal process when it seems the alcohol is not cleaning well enough, which is generally about 12-18 months, depending on frequency of use. Another good shaft cleaner is mechanic's hand cleaner with pumice. Not as thorough as ME, but good for removing light blueing quickly.

Bill

JoeW
12-06-2009, 01:50 PM
Thanks Billy Jack, sounds like a plan. I appreciate the help.

How much do you thin the shellac? I would guess 50% of so -- right?

BillyJack
12-06-2009, 04:33 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
How much do you thin the shellac? I would guess 50% of so -- right? </div></div>
If I'm using sanding sealer, I go full strength. With shellac, I thin 1:1 with denatured alcohol. Fold a paper towel to a pad,about 2 in. wide. Soak the towel, and wipe lengthwise from joint to tip. You can coat the ferrule as well. Work fast, as shellac dries almost instantly. After at least an hour of drying time, sand lightly, preferably under a strong light until the surface is uniformly dull. Wipe with a tack rag and repeat. Once dry, polish to your satisfaction. I've seen posters on AZ who were afraid of cleaning a shellacked shaft with alcohol for fear of melting the shellac. I've been doing this for years without incident.
Let me know what you think, Joe, once you use my method. I've tried many others, including Butcher's Wax as well as the specialty cue preparations. My homebrew process is my favorite of all. My shafts stay white almost forever, with a consistency of feel that lasts a long time.

Bill

JoeW
12-06-2009, 05:21 PM
I will pick up some shellac and let you know how it works out. Thanks again.

Bob Janzen
12-08-2009, 01:11 PM
Here is a quote from http://www.predatorcues.com:

SHAFT MAINTENANCE. To clean your Predator shaft, use a towel slightly dampened with rubbing alcohol. After cleaning, use a leather burnisher or similar material to seal the shaft. Using a Carnuba wax may also help to seal the shaft and protect it from moisture damage. To avoid damage, do not sand the shaft; no abrasive is necessary. Do not expose the shaft to excessive moisture and do not steam it to remove dings. Do not use a water-based cleaner.