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griffith_d
08-15-2002, 08:09 PM
I have a Meucci with an 5/16 X 18 joint. I have a Uni-Loc on my Pred BK. I know Uni-Loc has another joint, the Radial Pin.

Then there is the 5/16 X 14 and 3/8 X 10 and I am sure there are some more that are custom made.

I am thinking of getting a custom cue, for playing, and I am very unsure if which would be the best joint.

I am open to suggestions and comments through other experiences. Also the material, stainless, wood to wood (to me this would not last), aluminum,...etc.

Griff

BLACKHEART
08-15-2002, 10:30 PM
Don't sell the 3/8-10 joint short. I've been making Qs with this joint, since 1986 & I have yet to have one of my Qs come back with a stripped out thread in the shaft. The advantage of this thread, is that the screw makes contact with the wood in the shaft & gives you the most feed back from the tip to the hand. In short you get MORE FEEL with this joint. It also has the effect of a SOFTER hit. IT'S ANYTHING BUT FRAGILE...JER

Cueless Joey
08-16-2002, 01:56 AM
Jer,
Why not switch to the radial or the SW type pin?
Acme or radial threads last longer, don't they?
The radial and SW pins also have a unthreaded "wall" that keeps it straighter and more concentric than the regular 3/8 10 which is threaded from end to end.

clarence
08-16-2002, 03:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: BLACKHEART:</font><hr> Don't sell the 3/8-10 joint short. I've been making Qs with this joint, since 1986 &amp; I have yet to have one of my Qs come back with a stripped out thread in the shaft. The advantage of this thread, is that the screw makes contact with the wood in the shaft &amp; gives you the most feed back from the tip to the hand. In short you get MORE FEEL with this joint. It also has the effect of a SOFTER hit. IT'S ANYTHING BUT FRAGILE...JER <hr></blockquote>

Does a 3/8 x 10 gives more feedback compared to Uniloc or radial pin ?

PQQLK9
08-16-2002, 06:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: clarence:</font><hr> Does a 3/8 x 10 gives more feedback compared to Uniloc or radial pin ? <hr></blockquote>

Does to me ...I use them both and the 3/8 x 10 feels the best to me...(both the regular Mc Dermott and Predator shaft)

08-16-2002, 10:52 AM
BLACKHEART, You stated this joint provides the most feedback and a softer hit. Does this joint type produce a solid hit while at the same time a soft hit? If so, GREAT!

Thanks,

JayCee

08-16-2002, 11:50 AM
I think that if you are looking for a certain type of play out of a cue, you first have to look at the shaft taper, ferrule, and tip. The joint does have play some roll in how a cue hits.

I was told this by a wise collector once... he said he would cover 10 cues in paper and let me hit with all of them and if I could guess what joint was on each one correctly that I could have them. I never pursued that bet any further, it is impossible to tell. Think of the joint as nothing more than a fastening system, what is behind is the balance, and what is in front is the play.

BLACKHEART
08-16-2002, 12:57 PM
The 3/8-10 joint screw has large, course deep threads much like a wood screw, only not tapered. You wouldn't think of trying to hold two pieces of wood together with a FINE threaded screw. The courser threaded screw has more surface area &amp; much deeper thread. In other words it has more holding power in wood. I like this screw because it's simple to install, less chance to get things off center than if you were useing a 2 or 3 step prosses like when you use a bushing.
The Southwest screw has 11 threads to the inch, which is finer &amp; not as deep. It also is not as available as the more common 3/8-10. I think that Acme threads would work well for pool Qs, but again Acme srcews are not as commonly available. I have to admit, that I have not tryed the radial screw system, because I think it's more expensive, more complicated &amp; I just plain don't see why I want to change what ain't broke.
Any joint system, that holds the 2 pieces tightly together works well for pool Qs. Steel jointed Qs tend to be more front heavy, which I personally don't like as well as a more balanced feel.
If you screw a Q together with a fine threaded screw(with a bushing), &amp; a 3/8-10 joint you'll notice something right away. When the fine threaded one is 1/2 turn away from being tight, its very floppy &amp; loose. On the other hand the 3/8-10 at the same distance is firm &amp; with less play. I have experimented with lots of different joint systems &amp; this is what works for me. I get, what my customers call a firm, solid hit yet easy to draw the ball, with control. Part of this is due to the joint &amp; partly to the shaft taper &amp; ferrule. If I changed any part of the equation I would be making something other than a BLACK HEART...JER

griffith_d
08-16-2002, 01:10 PM
Well I have the shaft picked out, the 314, I have the tip picked out (Moori probably), the butt is going to be Cocobola with four points (still working on the rest of the butt, maybe some ebony), the butt cap probably ivory, the ferrule (don't know, which does not have many choices, maybe ivory).

I have thought about some ivory in the joint,....so you see where I am at.

I am still unsure of who I will choose to make it,...so many choices.

Griff

TomBrooklyn
08-16-2002, 01:29 PM
I have a sneaky pete made by Hank Thompson with a 3/8-10 screw. I don't feel any difference in the solidity of the hit between it and a one piece cue. -TB-

SpiderMan
08-16-2002, 04:23 PM
A piece of ivory large enough for a butt cap is very expensive. Be sure you pick out a maker with enough of a "name" that your cue will have a numismatic value to match the cost of materials!!!!

If you are willing to spend this much on materials, I'd suggest contacting Bill Schick about the cue. He's famous for his work in ivory, and has an amazing stock of the material. Also, he hand-finishes all of his inlay pockets with an X-acto blade, so that everything comes to a razor-sharp point. I shudder to think of a cue as expensive as what you are proposing, with inlay pockets just cut by a router bit.

SpiderMan

griffith_d
08-16-2002, 07:21 PM
I have roughly priced this cue with a couple of cuemakers. Yes, I know it is a little pricey, roughly $1000 to $1200. But I am a woodworker and really enjoy fine wood, just to look at it: it would be cool to actually use it for something too. If the cost gets too high I could cut out one thing or two,...

here is one that is roughly priced, not exactly what I want, but close.

http://www.barringercues.com/4poincuewitv.html

See what you think,...I value you comments SpiderMan, you seem to know what you are talking about.

I think I have heard of Bill Schick.

Griff

griffith_d
08-16-2002, 07:39 PM
Here is what I am talking about,...build your own. This is their pricing for ivory,..

http://order.store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/wg-order?unique=da875&amp;catalog=barringercustomcues&amp;et= 3d5daf7d&amp;basket=5Cd0e188d80179133d5da6f5442f7d0e18 8d85748bbd0ac5dd41533847c6c99e9

Not too bad,...it gives me something to go by and it will not be CNC.

Griff

SpiderMan
08-20-2002, 01:31 PM
Barringer does have an impressive web site, and their online information implies that they really know what they are doing. I have a friend in St Mary, one of these days when I visit him we're going to take a trip down to Barringer's.

The cue you pointed me to looks really nice. I did notice that to add ivory joint, ferrule, and butt cap was about an extra $300.

I just received my McDermott Prestige from Playpool.com, and am in the process of evaluating and reviewing it. I'll hopefully get a post up this weekend on it.

SpiderMan

griffith_d
08-20-2002, 02:29 PM
Their site is a good rule of thumb for pricing and what to expect in the way of woods and ivory and points and such.

Not a hard a fast rule.

Didn't I read that you had a lathe? I saw one for about $1700 on the internet for cue work.

If so, what is yours and what did you pay for it and where did you get it.

Griff

Cueless Joey
08-20-2002, 02:34 PM
Thanks Jer.
Jer, have you checked Barringer's site out? I was wondering why they place the joint pin INSIDE the forearm instead of the handle ( joint pin for handle and forearm).
I was wondering if you think this would kill the reasonance of the forearm and might cause buzzing later on.

SpiderMan
08-20-2002, 03:07 PM
When I click on the link you provided, it just takes me to a page that says "your shopping cart is empty". Can you check the URL?

SpiderMan

SpiderMan
08-20-2002, 03:15 PM
Griffith,

My lathe is a fairly standard metalworking lathe, made by Atlas around 1938. I bought it used but in very good condition (new bed and quick-change gearbox) for $700, and had to drive to St Louis to pick it up. I found it on the internet newsgroup rec.crafts.metalworking.

It is not a lathe made specifically for cue work, but most people who work on cues use this type of standard lathe also. All you really need to do regarding modifications is come up with a way of holding and centering that portion of a cue or shaft that hangs out to the left of the spindle bore. I use a set of bushings, others often mount a second three-jaw chuck.

It's nice to have a regular lathe around, as I use mine for all sorts of miscellaneous repair/modificaton chores on guns, motorcycles, and miscellaneous machinery (and cues).

SpiderMan
&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: griffith_d:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; Their site is a good rule of thumb for pricing and what to expect in the way of woods and ivory and points and such.

Not a hard a fast rule.

Didn't I read that you had a lathe? I saw one for about $1700 on the internet for cue work.

If so, what is yours and what did you pay for it and where did you get it.

Griff &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;