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schood85
12-30-2009, 12:45 PM
I'm trying to get some more information on what is the best path to become a professional. I'd say I'm an intermediate player (I'm a woman). I played a ton in college but now graduated and live in a town with no pool hall and I don't have a table. I'll get one as soon as I can afford it.

I really love playing pool and I'm wondering what to do next. Should I join one of the local leagues? They are only in bars here however. I went to the WPBA website but there is not much there on how to get started competing.

pooltchr
12-30-2009, 01:25 PM
The best way to start competing is to just jump in. Join a league. It's the easiest way to get into regular competition. Find any tournaments in your area and play in them. Test yourself to find out what your strengths and weaknesses are.

For the fast track to improving your game, find a qualified instructor who can work with you. A good instructor can help you see the good and weak parts of your game, and help you develop a stronger, more consistent game.

You don't say where you are located, but if you will let us know (you can PM if you like) I might be able to recommend one in your area.

Good Luck!

Steve

BCA Master Instr
12-30-2009, 03:57 PM
Good advice....

Rich R.
12-30-2009, 04:32 PM
I agree with everything Steve said but let me add that you may want to look for a regional women's tour close to you, especially one that is associated with the WPBA. You may be able to earn your way into the WPBA though a regional tour. In the meantime you will be able to see how you measure up to the other ladies trying to get onto the WPBA tour.

Billy_Bob
12-31-2009, 09:09 AM
Just start playing in tournaments.

Join every pool league you can find.

Then bars will have pool tournaments open to anyone. These are not well advertised. You can even go to a bar in the morning and ask a bartender if they have a pool tournament there and the bartender will say no! But it will turn out they do have one in the evening - the morning bartender does not know about it because it is not during his/her shift!

The best way to find out about these small local tournaments is to ask other pool players. Keep asking. If you find one tournament, ask the best players there if they know of other tournaments. Then when you go to those tournaments, ask 3 people there, etc.

Eventually you will learn of all the pool tournaments in your area.

The best thing is to have a different tournament to go to every night.

If there are nearby cities, these may have tournaments as well.

Also there are regional pool publications which list tournaments. Some of these listings are outdated and the place will no longer have a tournament or they may have changed the time a year ago! So call before going.

Then if you get to where you frequently win at a certain tournament, stop going to that tournament. Find a more difficult tournament with better players where you can't win. This will keep you working on improving your game.

Scott Lee
12-31-2009, 11:56 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: schood85</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I'm trying to get some more information on what is the best path to become a professional. I'd say I'm an intermediate player (I'm a woman). I played a ton in college but now graduated and live in a town with no pool hall and I don't have a table. I'll get one as soon as I can afford it.

I really love playing pool and I'm wondering what to do next. Should I join one of the local leagues? They are only in bars here however. I went to the WPBA website but there is not much there on how to get started competing. </div></div>

schood85...Several WPBA pros got started by playing in various leagues. I agree with others who suggested getting some evaluation from a qualified instructor (one who uses video review). If you let us know where you're located, we can probably recommend someone, and steer you to some regional women's events too! Good luck with your goal!

Scott Lee

schood85
01-01-2010, 02:04 AM
Thanks everyone! I will definitely try to get into some leagues here. I didn't even think of joining more than one but that's a good idea. I'm in Bullhead City, AZ. There's not much around here but it is an hour and a half from Las Vegas.

BCA Master Instr
01-01-2010, 09:21 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: schood85</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Thanks everyone! I will definitely try to get into some leagues here. I didn't even think of joining more than one but that's a good idea. I'm in Bullhead City, AZ. There's not much around here but it is an hour and a half from Las Vegas. </div></div>

I will be spending a week in Bullhead City this March. If you would like to meet socially or work on your game, either way just let me know....

Cornerman
01-01-2010, 01:48 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: schood85</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I'm trying to get some more information on what is the best path to become a professional. I'd say I'm an intermediate player (I'm a woman). I played a ton in college but now graduated and live in a town with no pool hall and I don't have a table. I'll get one as soon as I can afford it.

I really love playing pool and I'm wondering what to do next. Should I join one of the local leagues? They are only in bars here however. I went to the WPBA website but there is not much there on how to get started competing. </div></div>What area of the country? Some areas have more to offer for women than others.

{edit: I see you answered already!!} The Arizona Women's Billiard Tour I think just finished up their season and is making tour scheduling for next season.

http://www.awbt.net/

Fred

Billy_Bob
01-01-2010, 03:49 PM
I live in a small town too. I am at a disadvantage when having to drive 2 hours to a large city.

One tournament was a 2 day tournament with started at 8:00 am. So I get up at 5:00 am, and leave at 6 to get to the tournament at 8...

Then at 12:00 midnight I was still in the tournament and playing my last game. I wanted to LOSE that game! Otherwise I would have had to drive home 2 hours, sleep for a couple of hours, drive back 2 hours, and the tournament started again the next day at 10:00.

Or sleep in my car (I wouldn't sleep well).

Or get a hotel room which was VERY expensive in that area.

Now the locals just go home, get a good nights rest, then return the next day! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/mad.gif

Anyway there is a financial consideration to going to tournaments far away. And some bar tournaments don't pay very much. If your buying drinks and food for many hours, it can add up! (+ gas to get there.)

pooltchr
01-01-2010, 04:37 PM
I don't think I have ever been in a tournament and wanted to lose!
If you aren't entering to win, don't go.

Steve

Billy_Bob
01-02-2010, 08:30 AM
I was exhausted! There was no way I could make it back the next day and play any sort of decent game. Also I didn't know the tournament would go that late.

And I have not been back to that tournament. If I was to go again, I would get a hotel room the night before.

1Time
01-03-2010, 12:58 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: schood85</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I'm trying to get some more information on what is the best path to become a professional. I'd say I'm an intermediate player (I'm a woman). I played a ton in college but now graduated and live in a town with no pool hall and I don't have a table. I'll get one as soon as I can afford it.

I really love playing pool and I'm wondering what to do next. Should I join one of the local leagues? They are only in bars here however. I went to the WPBA website but there is not much there on how to get started competing. </div></div>

I'm an advanced male player, not a pro. I know how most better players get better at pool. And that's the first thing you should focus on. You're an intermediate player, and you need to play MUCH, MUCH better.

The SINGLE BEST way to do that is to hang with, watch, and shoot with better players. THAT is what you should do next. Don't waste your time in a league or around mediocre players. Go to the pool hall (not bars), and hang with the better players. Don't ever play for money, except in tourneys that you think you have a good shot of winning more than your entry fee. Focus on your goal of going pro - not gambling - not hustling - just tourney play for the $$.

Getting your own table isn't as important. Getting a limited amount of instruction isn't as important. Viewing / studying pool media isn't as important. Playing in tournaments or other competition isn't as important. Yes, of course, these things should be done. But to answer your question of what to do next - see SINGLE BEST above.

You'll very likely need to go at this full time. If you're not prepared to do so, I suggest re-evaluating your goal of going pro.

Scott Lee
01-04-2010, 12:06 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1Time</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: schood85</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I'm trying to get some more information on what is the best path to become a professional. I'd say I'm an intermediate player (I'm a woman). I played a ton in college but now graduated and live in a town with no pool hall and I don't have a table. I'll get one as soon as I can afford it.

I really love playing pool and I'm wondering what to do next. Should I join one of the local leagues? They are only in bars here however. I went to the WPBA website but there is not much there on how to get started competing. </div></div>

I'm an advanced male player, not a pro. I know how most better players get better at pool. And that's the first thing you should focus on. You're an intermediate player, and you need to play MUCH, MUCH better.

The SINGLE BEST way to do that is to hang with, watch, and shoot with better players. THAT is what you should do next. Don't waste your time in a league or around mediocre players. Go to the pool hall (not bars), and hang with the better players. Don't ever play for money, except in tourneys that you think you have a good shot of winning more than your entry fee. Focus on your goal of going pro - not gambling - not hustling - just tourney play for the $$.

Getting your own table isn't as important. Getting a limited amount of instruction isn't as important. Viewing / studying pool media isn't as important. Playing in tournaments or other competition isn't as important. Yes, of course, these things should be done. But to answer your question of what to do next - see SINGLE BEST above.

You'll very likely need to go at this full time. If you're not prepared to do so, I suggest re-evaluating your goal of going pro. </div></div>

Once again, more "sage" advice from 1-Time! DO NOT listen to him. Play in leagues, play in tournaments, get some quality instruction (you can't do better than randyg...aka BCA Master Instructor...he's the best in the U.S.A.). If you have time and money, do follow his advice to hang around and watch expert players. The rest of it is total b.s.

Scott Lee

1Time
01-04-2010, 03:13 AM
That's pretty sound advice I just posted. But I understand your need to save face. You need to look good to the readers because you make a living instructing pool. No problem.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Scott Lee</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Once again, more "sage" advice from 1-Time! DO NOT listen to him. Play in leagues, play in tournaments, get some quality instruction (you can't do better than randyg...aka BCA Master Instructor...he's the best in the U.S.A.). If you have time and money, do follow his advice to hang around and watch expert players. The rest of it is total b.s.

Scott Lee </div></div>

pooltchr
01-04-2010, 07:00 AM
[quote=1Time

I'm an advanced male player, not a pro. I know how most better players get better at pool. And that's the first thing you should focus on. You're an intermediate player, and you need to play MUCH, MUCH better. <span style="color: #FF0000">I don't believe she ever said what level player she is. How did you come to this conclusion? How do you know how much better she needs to become. I know a few players on the WPBA tour who are what I would call "intermediate" players. That doesn't stop them from competing and working to improve while they do. </span>

The SINGLE BEST way to do that is to hang with, watch, and shoot with better players. THAT is what you should do next. <span style="color: #FF0000">Good advice if you want to become a professional rail bird. To play competitively, you have to compete. </span> Don't waste your time in a league <span style="color: #FF0000">Leagues are one of the best ways to get into competition. You learn to ignore the distractions of a group of people watching every shot you make, and it doesn't matter how good your opponent is...you bring your best game to the table every time. </span> or around mediocre players. <span style="color: #FF0000">You might be surprised at how much you can learn from "medicore" (sp) players. I teach students of the game from all levels from beginner to pro...and it is rare that I don't learn something every time I teach. </span> Go to the pool hall (not bars), and hang with the better players. <span style="color: #FF0000">While there are some very good players as some pool halls, there are also many who have no idea what they are doing at the table. They may make some good shots, may win some matches, but are not doing things correctly. As RG says, a great shot make with a poor stroke is just an accident. </span> Don't ever play for money, except in tourneys that you think you have a good shot of winning more than your entry fee. <span style="color: #FF0000">Why limit yourself to only tournaments you think you can win? You are telling her on one hand to hang out and play with better players, but don't play in tournaments you can't win???? I think she should be playing in every tournament she can get in. The experience alone is worth it, whether or not you get in the money. </span> Focus on your goal of going pro - not gambling - not hustling - just tourney play for the $$. <span style="color: #FF0000"> I agree, but for a different reason. It's not about the money, it's about the experience</span>

Getting your own table isn't as important. <span style="color: #FF0000"> It is if you don't have convenient access to a pool room </span> Getting a limited amount of instruction isn't as important. <span style="color: #FF0000">There are very few successful pros who haven't had some instruction at one point or another. The really good ones are always trying to learn everything they can learn. </span> Viewing / studying pool media isn't as important. <span style="color: #FF0000">It can be, if it is done with a critical eye </span> Playing in tournaments or other competition isn't as important. <span style="color: #FF0000"> What??? You said above that she should play in tournaments she could win. If playing on the WPBA is her ultimate goal, how can you even suggest that playing in tournaments ins't important?</span> Yes, of course, these things should be done. But to answer your question of what to do next - see SINGLE BEST above. (I think the single best, would be to ignore the biggest part of your comments

You'll very likely need to go at this full time. If you're not prepared to do so, I suggest re-evaluating your goal of going pro. [/quote]
<span style="color: #FF0000"> There are plenty of players on the WPBA tour who hold down full time jobs. You have to be committed to your goal, you have to have a plan on how you are going to get there, you have to have mini goals along the way, and it doesn't hurt to have someone who can provide good valid advice to help you get there.
Steve</span>

Billy_Bob
01-04-2010, 07:21 AM
It sounds like 1Time is not wanting to take your money, so no conflict of interest with his advice! Thus good...

BTW 1Time, are there any pool halls in Las Vegas? Regular tournaments?

pooltchr
01-04-2010, 05:57 PM
Whether there is a conflict of interest or not, doesn't mean the advice was good.

Steve

Rich R.
01-05-2010, 08:23 AM
Good post Steve. I agree with just about everything you stated.

schood85
01-05-2010, 09:16 PM
Thanks everyone for their opinions. I was simply asking how do I get better without a pool table and without a pool hall. I wanted to know what the path to become a pro was. I know I need to get a lot better lol

BCA Master Instr
01-06-2010, 07:59 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: schood85</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Thanks everyone for their opinions. I was simply asking how do I get better without a pool table and without a pool hall. I wanted to know what the path to become a pro was. I know I need to get a lot better lol </div></div>

With out a table, it sounds a little bleak. There are not very many tables in Bullhead City that's for sure....Good luck!

Where there's a will, there's a way....SPF=randyg

wolfdancer
01-06-2010, 04:07 PM
It's like trying to learn how to hit a baseball, without a bat.
You could pick up some great tips though by reading "The Science Of Hitting" by the best batter, ever...the Splendid Splinter.
Bar pool leagues are fun, and i like the idea of getting to the table 6 times each game with an open shot....lol, but since she already is an accomplished player, I think she should play more on 9 ft'rs and play more against the men....it forces you to "tighten up", while staying loose.
Seems having a qualified instructor checking out her game and working out a "game plan" for her game.....first hand instruction, instead of the second hand, hand me down...you'll get from many league players. I remember Jeanette Lee having to brush off well intended tips from players she could give the 6 ball to.

Rich R.
01-06-2010, 08:02 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Bar pool leagues are fun, and i like the idea of getting to the table 6 times each game with an open shot....lol, but since she already is an accomplished player, I think she should play more on 9 ft'rs and play more against the men....it forces you to "tighten up", while staying loose.
</div></div>
Although most bar leagues are played on small tables, don't discount all leagues. I have been playing in the APA for 7 years and I have played in 3 different leagues. Everyone of them has been an in house league played on 9' tables. My current league is played on Diamond Pro tables. I know these leagues may be rare in some areas, but she may just have to search for the right league near her.

wolfdancer
01-07-2010, 01:59 AM
Rich, I've seen few 9 ft'rs in bars, and my reply was only meant for playing on the bar box.

Rich R.
01-07-2010, 05:16 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Rich, I've seen few 9 ft'rs in bars, and my reply was only meant for playing on the bar box. </div></div>
Wolf, I totally agree with you. Bars normally don't have 9' tables. That is why I said this young lady will have to search for a good league with 9' tables. Although I know of at least 6 of these leagues within reasonable driving distance from me, I know they are not common everywhere. Hopefully she will find one near her.

BTW, of the three APA leagues I have played in, only the current one is in an alcohol free house. The prior two were in sports bars/pool rooms that had very healthy bar businesses.

jjinfla
01-07-2010, 10:08 AM
Sounds like she asked what time it is and you guys started building her a clock and then got into a debate on what kind of clock. LOL

Nothing changes.

Listen to Byrne - run away from the game of pool.

Jake

Rich R.
01-08-2010, 12:09 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jjinfla</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Sounds like she asked what time it is and you guys started building her a clock and then got into a debate on what kind of clock. LOL

Nothing changes.

Listen to Byrne - run away from the game of pool.

Jake </div></div>
We all offered some suggestions with good intentions.
As always Jake, you just criticize and offer nothing.

"Nothing changes."

wolfdancer
01-08-2010, 12:27 AM
when I was involved with pool rooms, the thought was that you needed to get 40% of your gross from table rental, 40% from alcohol and other beverages, 20% from food and other sales.
In the town some 20 miles from here, where pool is really big, a room opened as a family room, no alcohol. Few came on opening day, and it was closed a week later....one week.
Now another place about 40 miles from here has pool tables, may still have a weekly tournament, and also has nude female strippers, that are known to walk thru the crowd.
It's a distraction when you are on the match winning shot, and face to face with the proof that she is a natural blond.

1Time
01-08-2010, 02:28 AM
No pool table, no pool hall, and no clue. You're not going to get it done in Kingman. Let me know when you've moved to Vegas or a major city and established yourself as a regular at a pool hall. The Cue Club is where the better players shoot in Vegas.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: schood85</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Thanks everyone for their opinions. I was simply asking how do I get better without a pool table and without a pool hall. I wanted to know what the path to become a pro was. I know I need to get a lot better lol </div></div>

Rich R.
01-08-2010, 05:47 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">when I was involved with pool rooms, the thought was that you needed to get 40% of your gross from table rental, 40% from alcohol and other beverages, 20% from food and other sales.
In the town some 20 miles from here, where pool is really big, a room opened as a family room, no alcohol. Few came on opening day, and it was closed a week later....one week.
Now another place about 40 miles from here has pool tables, may still have a weekly tournament, and also has nude female strippers, that are known to walk thru the crowd.
It's a distraction when you are on the match winning shot, and face to face with the proof that she is a natural blond. </div></div>
I've never been involved in the financial end of running a pool room so I will accept your breakdown of the income. It seems reasonable.
The room I have been playing at recently must be an exception to the rule. They have no alcohol and only minimal food. It is just a well run pool room with good equipment. They have had their troubles in this bad economy, like all other businesses, but they seem to be making it through. They seem to be proving that you can still make a go of it with a pool room without alcohol, or strippers. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/blush.gif