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wolfdancer
02-19-2010, 02:56 AM
The MLK/Browning holiday honoring Dr. King who met his maker after being gunned down, and a gun maker, Sam Browning
It all makes sense in Utah though as:
Supporters of the idea say Browning's inventions, which included the most sophisticated automatic and semi-automatic weaponry of the early 20th Century, were instrumental in U.S. wars against tyranny and partially responsible for the continued freedom that allowed King to do his work.
See,without the semi automatic weapons of Browning's, to back him up....Dr. King could not have spoken out against the use of firearms.....
Maybe California will come up with an RFK/Sirhan holiday, and Texas a JFK/Oswald holiday

cushioncrawler
02-21-2010, 07:10 AM
Woolfy -- the modern usofa system iz certainly anti'anti'tyranny.
madmac.

Historical forms (wiki)
In ancient Greece, tyrants were influential opportunists that came to power by securing the support of different factions of a deme. The word "tyrannos" then carried no ethical censure; it simply referred to anyone, good or bad, who obtained executive power in a polis by unconventional means. Support for the tyrants came from the growing middle class and from the peasants who had no land or were in debt to the wealthy land owners. It is true that they had no legal right to rule, but the people preferred them over kings or the aristocracy. The Greek tyrants stayed in power by using mercenary soldiers from outside of their respective city-state.

Cypselus, the first tyrant of Corinth in the 7th century BC, managed to bequeath his position to his son, Periander. Tyrants seldom succeeded in establishing an untroubled line of succession. In Athens, the inhabitants first gave the title to Peisistratus in 560 BC, followed by his sons, and with the subsequent growth of Athenian democracy, the title "tyrant" took on its familiar negative connotations. The murder of the tyrant Hipparchus by Aristogeiton and Harmodios in Athens in 514 BC marked the beginning of the so-called "cult of the tyrannicides" (i.e., of killers of tyrants). Contempt for tyranny characterised this cult movement. The attitude became especially prevalent in Athens after 508 BC, when Cleisthenes reformed the political system so that it resembled demokratia (ancient participant democracy as opposed to the modern representative democracy).

The Thirty Tyrants whom the Spartans imposed on a defeated Attica in 404 BC wouldn't be classified as tyrants in the usual sense.

wolfdancer
02-21-2010, 01:27 PM
Mac, an interesting history lesson, but at my age....it just sounds Greek to me

JohnnyD
02-21-2010, 08:42 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The MLK/Browning holiday honoring Dr. King who met his maker after being gunned down, and a gun maker, Sam Browning
It all makes sense in Utah though as:
Supporters of the idea say Browning's inventions, which included the most sophisticated automatic and semi-automatic weaponry of the early 20th Century, were instrumental in U.S. wars against tyranny and partially responsible for the continued freedom that allowed King to do his work.
See,without the semi automatic weapons of Browning's, to back him up....Dr. King could not have spoken out against the use of firearms.....
Maybe California will come up with an RFK/Sirhan holiday, and Texas a JFK/Oswald holiday
</div></div>This is racist.