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Gayle in MD
03-05-2010, 05:15 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> A furious effort by Liz Cheney to label seven Justice Department lawyers who previously defended Guantanamo detainees as terrorist sympathizers appears so contrary to the American legal tradition that it puts her at odds with the man responsible for getting her father elected vice president.

Back in January 2007, Ted Olson -- then a lawyer in private practice but previously a lead counsel in Bush v. Gore and solicitor general of the United States -- co-authored a short article for Legal Times in which he called efforts to demonize detainee defense lawyers as antithetical to American values.

"The ethos of the bar is built on the idea that lawyers will represent both the popular and the unpopular, so that everyone has access to justice. Despite the horrible Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, this is still proudly held as a basic tenet of our profession," Olson wrote.

"When government officials are called 'war criminals' and when public-interest lawyers are called 'terrorist huggers,' it not only cheapens the discourse, it scrambles the dialogue. The best solutions to these difficult problems will emerge only when the best advocates, backed by weighty resources, bring their talents to bear. And the heavy work of creating solutions for these complicated issues can only move forward when the name-calling ceases."

Olson co-bylined the piece with Neal Katyal, now the Principal Deputy Solicitor General of the United States and himself a defender of Gitmo detainees' rights. Katyal won a key Supreme Court case challenging the legality of President Bush's military commissions.

The 2007 article specifically addressed remarks from a Pentagon official who, at the time, had called out firms by name for doing legal work on behalf of Gitmo detainees.


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By Sam Stein



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/03/04/liz-cheneys-attack-on-al_n_485329.html

llotter
03-05-2010, 07:02 AM
It the current Moron in Chief whose loyalty is in question. It is him and his DOJ that are making accusations and investigations into our own CIA and navy seals and is disarming our country while dissing our allies and apologizing to our enemies. One is left to wonder about the loyalty of those who continue to support such blatent unamerican actions.

Gayle in MD
03-05-2010, 09:40 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: llotter</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It the current Moron in Chief whose loyalty is in question. It is him and his DOJ that are making accusations and investigations into our own CIA and navy seals and is disarming our country while dissing our allies and apologizing to our enemies. One is left to wonder about the loyalty of those who continue to support such blatent unamerican actions. </div></div>

I already told you, the mmoron is gone!

One can only wonder how a moron, could recognize who is and isn't a moron. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif

Gayle in MD
03-05-2010, 02:00 PM
Update, the outcry against Liz Cheney the domestic terrorist, is growing.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The backlash is growing against Liz Cheney after she demonized Department of Justice attorneys as terrorist sympathizers for their past legal work defending Gitmo detainees -- and now it's coming from within deeply conservative legal circles.

On Friday, the conservative blog Power Line put up a post titled, "An Attack That Goes Too Far." Author Paul Mirengoff, called Cheney's effort to brand DoJ officials the "Al Qaeda 7," "vicious" and "unfounded" even if it was right to criticize defense lawyers for voluntarily doing work on behalf of Gitmo detainees.

Reached on the phone, Mirengoff offered an even sharper rebuke, contrasting what Cheney is doing to the anti-communist crusades launched by Sen. Joseph McCarthy and, in some respects, finding it worse.

"It could be worse than some of the assertions made by McCarthy, depending on some of the validity of those assertions," Mirengoff said, explaining that at least McCarthy was correct in pinpointing individuals as communist sympathizers. "It is just baseless to suggest that [these DoJ officials] share al Qaeda values... they didn't actually say it but I think it was a fair implication of what they were saying."

Mirengoff isn't alone among conservative legal theorists who think the ad campaign by Cheney's group, Keep America Safe, is distasteful. In a statement to the American Prospect, John Bellinger III, a former legal adviser to Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice, called the effort "unfortunate."

"It reflects the politicization and the polarization of terrorism issues," Bellinger said. "Neither Republicans nor Democrats should be attacking officials in each other's administrations based solely on the clients they have represented in the past."

Likewise, the Huffington Post reported on Thursday that back in 2007, Ted Olson -- who served as a lead counsel in Bush v. Gore and solicitor general of the United States -- co-authored an article for Legal Times in which he said that efforts to demonize detainee defense lawyers are antithetical to American values.

"When government officials are called 'war criminals' and when public-interest lawyers are called 'terrorist huggers,' it not only cheapens the discourse, it scrambles the dialogue," Olson wrote, along with Neal Katyal, currently a DoJ Deputy Solicitor General and one of the lawyers who represented Gitmo detainees. "The best solutions to these difficult problems will emerge only when the best advocates, backed by weighty resources, bring their talents to bear. And the heavy work of creating solutions for these complicated issues can only move forward when the name-calling ceases."

Cheney, for her part, shows no signs of relenting. Hours after her organization was able to browbeat the DoJ into releasing the names of the seven officials who previously represented detainees, it put out a statement demanding even more disclosure.

"We regret that they still refuse to tell the American people whether any of these lawyers are currently working on detainee issues inside the Department," said Aaron Harison, the executive director of Keep America Safe. "The American people have a right to know whether lawyers who voluntarily flocked to Guantanamo to take up the cause of the terrorists are currently working on detainee issues in President Obama's Justice Department."


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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Another Bush Official Defends Smeared DoJ Lawyers.

John Bellinger III, a former legal adviser to Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice and currently a partner at the law firm of Arnold and Porter, defended the nine Department of Justice lawyers who have been accused of being terrorist sympathizers by Liz Cheney's group, Keep America Safe.

“I think it’s unfortunate that these individuals are being criticized for their past representation. It reflects the politicization and the polarization of terrorism issues," Bellinger said. "Neither Republicans nor Democrats should be attacking officials in each other’s administrations based solely on the clients they have represented in the past.”

“We’ve had a long-standing tradition in our country for lawyers to represent unpopular causes, and they shouldn’t be attacked for doing so," Bellinger added.

Earlier today Peter D. Keisler, who was head of the Civil Division of the Justice Department under the Bush administration, also defended the so-called al-Qaeda Seven in an interview with The New York Times.

-- A. Serwer

Posted by Adam Serwer on March 4, 2010 5:47 PM
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http://www.prospect.org/csnc/blogs/tappe...fficial_defends (http://www.prospect.org/csnc/blogs/tapped_archive?month=03&year=2010&base_name=another_bush_official_defends)



<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">March 4, 2010, 4:26 pm
Bush Official Defends Lawyers Under Attack for Detainee Work
By CHARLIE SAVAGE
6:37 p.m. | Updated A former Justice Department official who led the Bush administration’s courtroom defense against lawsuits filed by Guantanamo detainees is denouncing attacks on Obama administration appointees who previously helped such prisoners challenge their indefinite detention without trial.

Peter D. Keisler, who was assistant attorney general for the civil division in the Bush administration, said in an interview that it was “wrong” to attack lawyers who volunteered to help such lawsuits before joining the Justice Department.

“There is a longstanding and very honorable tradition of lawyers representing unpopular or controversial clients,” Mr. Keisler said. “The fact that someone has acted within that tradition, as many lawyers, civilian and military, have done with respect to people who are accused of terrorism – that should never be a basis for suggesting that they are unfit in any way to serve in the Department of Justice.”

Mr. Keisler spoke out one day after the Justice Department confirmed a Fox News report naming nine political appointees who had worked on detainee litigation before to joining the government. The department had declined to identify seven of those officials in response to a request by congressional Republicans.


This week, the conservative group Keep American Safe, which is led in part by Liz Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, and by Bill Kristol of the Weekly Standard, had released a political video attacking the Obama administration for concealing the identity of those it called the “Al Qaeda Seven.”


“Whose values do they share?” a voice asks over images of seven silhouettes superimposed on Al Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden. “Americans have a right to know the identities of the Al Qaeda Seven.”

The Keep America Safe video led to widespread discussion in the blogosphere, with some critics likening it to McCarthyism. Mr. Keisler did not use that term. But he strongly defended the lawyers who were once his opponents in litigation.

As volunteer lawyers for the detainees, he said, “they were asserting the position that there should be more judicial review of the circumstances of that detention – a position the Supreme Court ultimately agreed with. And it’s wrong to suggest that people who took that position are somehow sympathetic to Al Qaeda.”

There have been periodic political attacks on lawyers representing detainees. Although the lawyers tend to be espousing civil libertarian views, their critics have tried to impute to them sympathy for the terrorist causes.

In 2007, the Bush administration’s top detainee affairs official, Charles “Cully” Stimson, resigned over remarks he made on a radio show suggesting that corporations should stop hiring law firms that provided pro bono legal assistance to detainees. According to the Justice Department, at least 34 of the nation’s 50 largest firms have either represented detainees or filed amicus briefs on their behalf.

The current dispute traces back several months to an oversight hearing at which Senator Charles Grassley, Republican of Iowa, asked Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. to disclose which lawyers in the department had previously worked on lawsuits by detainees challenging their detention without trial at Guantanamo.

Last month, the department sent a letter to the Senate saying that there were nine political appointees who had been involved in detainee-related litigation before joining the department. It added that they were obeying ethics rules preventing conflicts of interest concerning specific cases they or their former firms have worked on.

Two of the officials were known to Senator Grassley already: Principal Deputy Solicitor General Neal Katyal, who as a Georgetown University law professor had represented a detainee in a landmark Supreme Court decision striking down the Bush administration’s military commissions, and Jennifer Daskal, a national security division lawyer who previously worked for Human Rights Watch, which has advocated for detainees.

But the department didn’t identify the other seven.

Mr. Grassley called that response inadequate, saying people “want to know who is advising the president and the Attorney General, especially after it’s become very clear to Americans across the country that misguided decisions on terrorism policy are being made. An answer like I received today doesn’t live up to the transparency in government President Obama promised and doesn’t sit well with me or Iowans.”

But the dispute attracted little attention until Keep America Safe put out its political video this week. Then, on Wednesday, Fox News released a report identifying the seven, whose names appear on various court briefs that are in the public record.

The seven were Jonathan Cedarbaum, Eric Columbus, Karl Thompson, Joseph Guerra, Tali Farhadian, Beth Brinkmann, and Tony West. Their names were confirmed by Justice Department spokesman Matt Miller, who said it was “offensive that their patriotism is being questioned.”

Mr. Miller added that “politics has overtaken facts and reality” in the controversy, saying the names have been readily available to anyone who could use a search engine, but that the department had not produced it for the senators because, “We will not participate in an attempt to drag people’s names through the mud for political purposes.”

Keep America Safe posted links to the Fox News report on its Web site, under the headline “Meet the Al Qaeda Nine.”

The Fox News report also noted that the Bush administration had hired at least three lawyers who had previously helped represent detainees: Pratik Shah, Trisha Anderson and Varda Hussein.

Keep America Safe shows no sign that it intends to stop putting a spotlight on the Justice Department attorneys who formerly worked on detainee-related litigation, even though their names are now public.

The Justice Department has declined to disclose the specific issues each attorney has worked on, but Aaron Harison, the executive director of Keep America Safe, said the group wants to know that, too.

“We’re asking for transparency from the Obama Administration,” Mr. Harison said in a statement. “The American people have a right to know whether lawyers who used to represent terrorists, including advocating for their immediate release, are now working on detainee issues inside the Department of Justice.”

Mr. Harison also defended his group’s attacks against charges of McCarthyism, saying that it is asking legitimate questions about whether attorneys who “chose to spend their pro bono hours defending terrorists, many of whom killed Americans,” are appropriate for their positions.

In an interview, Debra Burlingame, another board member of the group, also called into question the judgment of lawyers who worked to help free detainees. Her brother was the pilot of American Airlines flight 77, which Al Qaeda hijackers crashed into the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001.

“I’m not saying that what they’ve been doing is criminal, not saying what they are doing is outside the law, or that they should be sanctioned or disbarred – none of that,” she said. “What we’re saying is who are they, what have they done, and are they in policy positions in the Department of Justice?”


This week, the conservative group Keep American Safe, which is led in part by Liz Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, and by Bill Kristol of the Weekly Standard, had released a political video attacking the Obama administration for concealing the identity of those it called the “Al Qaeda Seven.”


“Whose values do they share?” a voice asks over images of seven silhouettes superimposed on Al Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden. “Americans have a right to know the identities of the Al Qaeda Seven.”

The Keep America Safe video led to widespread discussion in the blogosphere, with some critics likening it to McCarthyism. Mr. Keisler did not use that term. But he strongly defended the lawyers who were once his opponents in litigation.

As volunteer lawyers for the detainees, he said, “they were asserting the position that there should be more judicial review of the circumstances of that detention – a position the Supreme Court ultimately agreed with. And it’s wrong to suggest that people who took that position are somehow sympathetic to Al Qaeda.”

There have been periodic political attacks on lawyers representing detainees. Although the lawyers tend to be espousing civil libertarian views, their critics have tried to impute to them sympathy for the terrorist causes.

In 2007, the Bush administration’s top detainee affairs official, Charles “Cully” Stimson, resigned over remarks he made on a radio show suggesting that corporations should stop hiring law firms that provided pro bono legal assistance to detainees. According to the Justice Department, at least 34 of the nation’s 50 largest firms have either represented detainees or filed amicus briefs on their behalf.

The current dispute traces back several months to an oversight hearing at which Senator Charles Grassley, Republican of Iowa, asked Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. to disclose which lawyers in the department had previously worked on lawsuits by detainees challenging their detention without trial at Guantanamo.

Last month, the department sent a letter to the Senate saying that there were nine political appointees who had been involved in detainee-related litigation before joining the department. It added that they were obeying ethics rules preventing conflicts of interest concerning specific cases they or their former firms have worked on.

Two of the officials were known to Senator Grassley already: Principal Deputy Solicitor General Neal Katyal, who as a Georgetown University law professor had represented a detainee in a landmark Supreme Court decision striking down the Bush administration’s military commissions, and Jennifer Daskal, a national security division lawyer who previously worked for Human Rights Watch, which has advocated for detainees.

But the department didn’t identify the other seven.

Mr. Grassley called that response inadequate, saying people “want to know who is advising the president and the Attorney General, especially after it’s become very clear to Americans across the country that misguided decisions on terrorism policy are being made. An answer like I received today doesn’t live up to the transparency in government President Obama promised and doesn’t sit well with me or Iowans.”

But the dispute attracted little attention until Keep America Safe put out its political video this week. Then, on Wednesday, Fox News released a report identifying the seven, whose names appear on various court briefs that are in the public record.

The seven were Jonathan Cedarbaum, Eric Columbus, Karl Thompson, Joseph Guerra, Tali Farhadian, Beth Brinkmann, and Tony West. Their names were confirmed by Justice Department spokesman Matt Miller, who said it was “offensive that their patriotism is being questioned.”

Mr. Miller added that “politics has overtaken facts and reality” in the controversy, saying the names have been readily available to anyone who could use a search engine, but that the department had not produced it for the senators because, “We will not participate in an attempt to drag people’s names through the mud for political purposes.”

Keep America Safe posted links to the Fox News report on its Web site, under the headline “Meet the Al Qaeda Nine.”

The Fox News report also noted that the Bush administration had hired at least three lawyers who had previously helped represent detainees: Pratik Shah, Trisha Anderson and Varda Hussein.

Keep America Safe shows no sign that it intends to stop putting a spotlight on the Justice Department attorneys who formerly worked on detainee-related litigation, even though their names are now public.

The Justice Department has declined to disclose the specific issues each attorney has worked on, but Aaron Harison, the executive director of Keep America Safe, said the group wants to know that, too.

“We’re asking for transparency from the Obama Administration,” Mr. Harison said in a statement. “The American people have a right to know whether lawyers who used to represent terrorists, including advocating for their immediate release, are now working on detainee issues inside the Department of Justice.”

Mr. Harison also defended his group’s attacks against charges of McCarthyism, saying that it is asking legitimate questions about whether attorneys who “chose to spend their pro bono hours defending terrorists, many of whom killed Americans,” are appropriate for their positions.

In an interview, Debra Burlingame, another board member of the group, also called into question the judgment of lawyers who worked to help free detainees. Her brother was the pilot of American Airlines flight 77, which Al Qaeda hijackers crashed into the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001.

“I’m not saying that what they’ve been doing is criminal, not saying what they are doing is outside the law, or that they should be sanctioned or disbarred – none of that,” she said. “What we’re saying is who are they, what have they done, and are they in policy positions in the Department of Justice?”
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Gee, guess Liz would think John Adams was a terrorist lover.

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Deeman3
03-05-2010, 02:14 PM
Go Liz! Perhaps we have another politician in the making. The more far left sites call her names the more popular she will become.

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Gayle in MD
03-05-2010, 02:31 PM
You know, Deeman, your efforts have long since lost their impact on me.

There was a time when I'll admit you irritated the **** out of me, but back then I was still in a state of shock over what comprises Americans voters, and their flaws.

These days, I've read enough on the internet, to understand the nature of the animal, and much as I know it will disappoint you, since you started out admitting that I was your favorite person to go after, I am now a breast cancer survivor, and silliness like yours is about as effective these days, and a little bird sh** on my windshield.

Have at it, though, since you get so pleased with yourself about it. I've grown to rather like you, and just think I'm saving your wife from a very unpleasant evening. Happy to serve a good cause.
/forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
G.

LWW
03-07-2010, 08:53 AM
Yes ... just because these attorneys represent terrorists doesn't mean that these attorneys represent terrorists.

LWW