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Bambu
03-23-2010, 08:20 AM
We have all felt the same feeling at one time or another. Heart racing, sweaty palms, jumbled thoughts in your head. When this happens, I always try to calm myself down. Sometimes it works, other times not.

The strange thing I can't really figure out is, sometimes I can get this to work in my favor. Sure I can choke it too, but other times I can step it up. I'd like to say the more important the match the better I play, but thats not always the case. I can't always control my game, or my thoughts.

In trying to make sense of it all, I can't. The best I can say is that there seems to be a fine line between negative and positive adrenaline(if there is such a thing).

Or, when I think I am getting "it" to work....am I merely playing well despite the nervousness? Does this all boil down to our simple fight or flight mechanism? I am starting to think so. Adrenaline from fear will drain your energy(flight). Adrenaline caused by a sense of urgency, can spark your will to succeed(fight).

gabeski
03-23-2010, 09:03 AM
Funny how things like that can happen. Last night we played one of the best teams in our league (4 person ACS format) 3 A level players and a B level (in my rating) normally these guys rattle me bad and I loose to them. Last night I shook through the entire match, but was able to focus that nervous energy and calm down before each shot. I BEAT all but One of them, ADRENALINE I guess and WOW!

03-23-2010, 04:57 PM
Adrenaline is something that has to be dealt with, no way around it.

IMO, I think this is what separates champions from also-rans. You have to embrace the adrenaline. It has to be something that you force yourself to enjoy.

I used to begin practice with a big cup of coffee. If anything, I was trying to teach myself to deal with teh big rush and to play well with it. Basically, trying to simulate nerves from a big match.

I'm sure there are some that deal wit hthe adrenaline rush better than others. Those are probably the ones who win in most sports.


Eric

Bambu
03-24-2010, 07:59 AM
The thing is, most people are taught to remain calm and cool whenever possible, to take breaks when the pressure begins to mount, to try to relax, and shake it off. I always got the feeling that pros took their game in stride; they know how to tune errors out. But, not all of them do.

Have they learned to shake the butterflies, or harness their power? Perhaps it's a matter of personality type. We have the laid back, emotionless type. Nothing seems to bother these players, they have nerves of steel(Efren Reyes). Then you have the tenacious type, such as Karen Corr. Karen plays with pure energy, she lives for the moment.

Perhaps its best that we decide where we individually fit in, and adapt to our own emotional strengths and weaknesses.

Fran Crimi
03-24-2010, 09:36 AM
Bambu, If you get a chance do some research on two chemicals our body produces: One is choline and the other is catecholamine. The first one is an essential B nutrient that decreases as stress increases and the second one is the fight or flight hormone, which we know as adrenaline.

Adrenaline is one thing, but when we are extremely stressed, our bodies become drained of important nutrients, such as choline. I think that maybe that's when things start to go bad for us ---- once our body becomes deprived of those nutrients. I bet that's what you mean when describing when good adrenaline starts to turn bad.

bradb
03-24-2010, 04:35 PM
I think we can define adrenalin as a product of anxiety (fear.) I have high anxiety from my early years as a kid. Sometimes its so bad I need medication, but lately I have been taking B12 and it helps to some degree.

When we are nervous or tense or just plain hyper it is different from high anxiety.
With the adrenilin produced by anxiety you cannot function. Your heart races, your chest feels like its going to explode and you feel like you have to run like a wild animal, certainly not good conditions for playing pool.

With increased awareness under pressure situations you have the shakes, your nerves are on edge and your heart may increase a bit but you can still have control. But with adrenalin pumping maybe its good for a physical sport like tackling a full back, but its not good for a precision game, and even then you can be prone to injury or will make mental errors. -Brad

Bambu
03-25-2010, 07:57 AM
Thanks Fran, very interesting. Yes, this is what I have suspected.....seemingly good adrenaline can turn bad. So would you say that "some" adrenaline is good? Or, should it be avoided whenever possible? Is a little adrenaline only beneficial to those who feel they can control it? Do seasoned pros still get nervous during crunch time, or is it just another game to them? If and when they do feel nervous, do they shake it off....or just go with it? I dont mean for you to answer every question, but I am interested in any further input you could add.<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Fran Crimi</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Bambu, If you get a chance do some research on two chemicals our body produces: One is choline and the other is catecholamine. The first one is an essential B nutrient that decreases as stress increases and the second one is the fight or flight hormone, which we know as adrenaline.

Adrenaline is one thing, but when we are extremely stressed, our bodies become drained of important nutrients, such as choline. I think that maybe that's when things start to go bad for us ---- once our body becomes deprived of those nutrients. I bet that's what you mean when describing when good adrenaline starts to turn bad.</div></div>

Bambu
03-25-2010, 08:13 AM
Thats what I used to think too, leave the baseball mentality at home. But now, I'm thinking a little of that can be a good thing.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: bradb</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I think we can define adrenalin as a product of anxiety (fear.) I have high anxiety from my early years as a kid. Sometimes its so bad I need medication, but lately I have been taking B12 and it helps to some degree.

When we are nervous or tense or just plain hyper it is different from high anxiety.
With the adrenilin produced by anxiety you cannot function. Your heart races, your chest feels like its going to explode and you feel like you have to run like a wild animal, certainly not good conditions for playing pool.

With increased awareness under pressure situations you have the shakes, your nerves are on edge and your heart may increase a bit but you can still have control. But with adrenalin pumping maybe its good for a physical sport like tackling a full back, but its not good for a precision game, and even then you can be prone to injury or will make mental errors. -Brad</div></div>

Fran Crimi
03-25-2010, 01:05 PM
Bambu, I'm nowhere near an expert at this but from my own studies on the subject, I would think that yes, adrenaline can be good until your body starts to become depleted of important nutrients. I think we can tell when that starts to happen when we start to feel too jittery. I think Brad's comments about taking a B vitamin fix runs right along with this, as that's coincidentally the same vitamin family that cortisol is in.

Fran

Bambu
03-26-2010, 06:24 AM
Excellent, thank you Fran!

Sid_Vicious
03-26-2010, 06:52 AM
I'm not so sure about this nutrient deficiency ideas. I have watched, and I also have played personally, where during regulated matches of competition, the stress and adrenaline obviously killed a performer. The quicksand just kept getting worse and worse. THEN after the matches, players, including me, move onto gambling sets and BAM! the game comes back in grand fashion! Nutrients don't leave, and then come back like that. IMO, if you start to nit pick your nutrient levels to lower adrenaline, you are over thinking, which creates adrenaline by itself. sid

Gayle in MD
03-26-2010, 07:57 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sid_Vicious</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I'm not so sure about this nutrient deficiency ideas. I have watched, and I also have played personally, where during regulated matches of competition, the stress and adrenaline obviously killed a performer. The quicksand just kept getting worse and worse. THEN after the matches, players, including me, move onto gambling sets and BAM! the game comes back in grand fashion! Nutrients don't leave, and then come back like that. IMO, if you start to nit pick your nutrient levels to lower adrenaline, you are over thinking, which creates adrenaline by itself. sid </div></div>

I've seen plenty of that, too, Martin, and up close...especially when I'm playing on a team, and everything is hanging on my match! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif

Here's one I wish I could understand.

One night I was having a problem with my neck, got a pinched nerve that acts up when I've been doing a lot of heavy work in my gardens, and so I took a pain killer, as soon as I arrived, thinking it would be worn off before I had to drive home, and MAN! I played great!

Made a solemn promise to myself though, that I would NOT take one the next week! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif And didn't.

I would just like to know, though, why I played so fantastically well that night. One would think that being on morphine would have dulled my senses, and ruined my game. Nope, just the opposite.

I find under normal circumstances, just one beer, relaxes me just enough, but only one, I've learned, and only when I feel pressured, like in a play off situation.



Disclaimer: Not a good idea to ever use a pain pill...just to win, I'd say... /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

cushioncrawler
03-26-2010, 02:59 PM
I reckon that i play better when my body iz tired. I used to play 36 holes of golf before driving in to melbourne to play billiards.
But of course no one can play well when their eyes are tired and not talking to eech other.
But some players can play ok after a few beers.
madMac.

bradb
03-26-2010, 03:19 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD [/quote</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

One night I was having a problem with my neck, got a pinched nerve that acts up when I've been doing a lot of heavy work in my gardens, and so I took a pain killer, as soon as I arrived, thinking it would be worn off before I had to drive home, and MAN! I played great!

Made a solemn promise to myself though, that I would NOT take one the next week! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif And didn't.

I would just like to know, though, why I played so fantastically well that night. One would think that being on morphine would have dulled my senses, and ruined my game. Nope, just the opposite.

I find under normal circumstances, just one beer, relaxes me just enough, but only one, I've learned, and only when I feel pressured, like in a play off situation.

Disclaimer: Not a good idea to ever use a pain pill...just to win, I'd say... /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif </div></div>

I used medication for my anxiety and it made my game worse, I don't beleive in chemical meds, I like natural if you can find what works best for you.

As for the playing well after a pain killer it was proibably just a coincidence, I 've had nights where I'm shooting great and there seems to be no reason for it other than karma. Brad

Gayle in MD
03-26-2010, 03:33 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: bradb</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD </div></div>

One night I was having a problem with my neck, got a pinched nerve that acts up when I've been doing a lot of heavy work in my gardens, and so I took a pain killer, as soon as I arrived, thinking it would be worn off before I had to drive home, and MAN! I played great!

Made a solemn promise to myself though, that I would NOT take one the next week! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif And didn't.

I would just like to know, though, why I played so fantastically well that night. One would think that being on morphine would have dulled my senses, and ruined my game. Nope, just the opposite.

I find under normal circumstances, just one beer, relaxes me just enough, but only one, I've learned, and only when I feel pressured, like in a play off situation.

Disclaimer: Not a good idea to ever use a pain pill...just to win, I'd say... /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif [/quote</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

I used medication for my anxiety and it made my game worse, I don't beleive in chemical meds, I like natural if you can find what works best for you.

As for the playing well after a pain killer it was proibably just a coincidence, I 've had nights where I'm shooting great and there seems to be no reason for it other than karma. Brad </div></div>

I have always been very afraid of medicine, and pain killers. I try to avoid taking anything at all, even if it is just an over the counter medication.

I guess it might have been a coincidence, but it didn't seem that way, although I do get "High" on life pretty regularly, so maybe that was it. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif

Gayle in MD
03-26-2010, 03:34 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I reckon that i play better when my body iz tired. I used to play 36 holes of golf before driving in to melbourne to play billiards.
But of course no one can play well when their eyes are tired and not talking to eech other.
But some players can play ok after a few beers.
madMac. </div></div>

That's interesting Mac. I can't shoot a lick when I'm tired.... /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/tired.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

cushioncrawler
03-26-2010, 04:47 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I reckon that i play better when my body iz tired. I used to play 36 holes of golf before driving in to melbourne to play billiards. But of course no one can play well when their eyes are tired and not talking to eech other.
But some players can play ok after a few beers. madMac.</div></div><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">That's interesting Mac. I can't shoot a lick when I'm tired.... /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/tired.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif</div></div>I think that when tired both the brain and the body arent so jumpy -- and its an effort to do anything -- things seem to happen in slower motion.

Anger -- anger iz the best thing -- anger at yourself of course -- for missing eezy shots etc -- anxiety iz replaced with anger, and u kum back from the dead and win.
Now, if only u kood get that anger going early -- ie without having to firstly miss eezy shots etc and looking like a loozer.
Iz there a drug that makes u angry???????? Or perhaps a pikture of someone that u hate????????
madMac.

Qtec
03-27-2010, 06:01 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Eric</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Adrenaline is something that has to be dealt with, no way around it.

IMO, I think this is what separates champions from also-rans. You have to embrace the adrenaline. It has to be something that you force yourself to enjoy.

I used to begin practice with a big cup of coffee. If anything, I was trying to teach myself to deal with teh big rush and to play well with it. Basically, trying to simulate nerves from a big match.

I'm sure there are some that deal wit hthe adrenaline rush better than others. Those are probably the ones who win in most sports.


Eric </div></div>

I agree.
Here is a classic hill-hill game, Hendry v White. After 2 days play it comes down to this frame. Jimmy looks to have it all sewn up and misses frame ball really. Hendry gets a chance and clears up. link (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Fm3yIi5gfA)
When you watch him it looks like he is super cool but later he admitted he could hardly stand up because his legs were shaking so badly but he played every ball perfectly never losing shape/position once.
I think that pressure and adrenaline is what top players use to raise their game.

Qtec

Fran Crimi
03-27-2010, 07:11 AM
<span style="color: #000099">Correction: In the post above I accidentally wrote the word 'cortisol' instead of 'choline'. Choline is the b-Vitamin, cortisol is another type of stress hormone. I cut and pasted an article below on Cortisol: </span>

Alan D. Garely, MD, FACOG
Stress Ads
Stress

Cortisol Ria

Cortisol Function

How to Reduce Stress

Symptoms Cortisol
Cortisol is an important hormone in the body, secreted by the adrenal glands and involved in the following functions and more:

Proper glucose metabolism
Regulation of blood pressure
Insulin release for blood sugar maintanence
Immune function
Inflammatory response
Normally, it’s present in the body at higher levels in the morning, and at its lowest at night. Although stress isn’t the only reason that cortisol is secreted into the bloodstream, it has been termed “the stress hormone” because it’s also secreted in higher levels during the body’s ‘fight or flight’ response to stress, and is responsible for several stress-related changes in the body. Small increases of cortisol have some positive effects:


A quick burst of energy for survival reasons
Heightened memory functions
A burst of increased immunity
Lower sensitivity to pain
Helps maintain homeostasis in the body
While cortisol is an important and helpful part of the body’s response to stress, it’s important that the body’s relaxation response to be activated so the body’s functions can return to normal following a stressful event. Unfortunately, in our current high-stress culture, the body’s stress response is activated so often that the body doesn’t always have a chance to return to normal, resulting in a state of chronic stress.

Higher and more prolonged levels of cortisol in the bloodstream (like those associated with chronic stress) have been shown to have negative effects, such as:


Impaired cognitive performance
Suppressed thyroid function
Blood sugar imbalances such as hyperglycemia
Decreased bone density
Decrease in muscle tissue
Higher blood pressure
Lowered immunity and inflammatory responses in the body, slowed wound healing, and other health consequences
Increased abdominal fat, which is associated with a greater amount of health problems than fat deposited in other areas of the body. Some of the health problems associated with increased stomach fat are heart attacks, strokes, the development of metabolic syndrome, higher levels of “bad” cholesterol (LDL) and lower levels of “good” cholesterol (HDL), which can lead to other health problems!
To keep cortisol levels healthy and under control, the body’s relaxation response should be activated after the fight or flight response occurs. You can learn to relax your body with various stress management techniques, and you can make lifestyle changes in order to keep your body from reacting to stress in the first place.

Sid_Vicious
03-27-2010, 01:01 PM
I have to ask something here. Are some of these nutrients/drugs/etc. simulated in illicit drug use? Do the speed/coke users who play pool and make the bathroom jaunt get fake performance because of this nutrient ghosting for that time when they are "cruising?" sid

Fran Crimi
03-29-2010, 07:01 AM
It's an interesting question but I think one would have to be or know a chemist to get the answer to that. There are probably some studies out there regarding performance-enhancing drugs that you could possibly research.

LWW
03-29-2010, 01:12 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Fran Crimi</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Bambu, I'm nowhere near an expert at this but from my own studies on the subject, I would think that yes, adrenaline can be good until your body starts to become depleted of important nutrients. I think we can tell when that starts to happen when we start to feel too jittery. I think Brad's comments about taking a B vitamin fix runs right along with this, as that's coincidentally the same vitamin family that <s>cortisol</s> choline is in.

Fran </div></div>

A good B complex and choline dose is a great idea, along with other good vitamins.

Another good idea is a reasonably high fiber diet as this slows the release of glucose into your system and levels out the sugar rush and crash cycle.

LWW

LAMas
03-30-2010, 12:20 AM
Whole fruit is a good source of natural sugar for it is delivered along with fiber whereas fruit juice sans fiber will result in a sugar high. A good example would be sugar cane which is loaded with fiber. Also remember to eat the whole fruit skin and all.

Stay away from high fructose corn syrup in soft drinks etc when shooting pool.

http://www.organicauthority.com/blog/org...rse-than-sugar/ (http://www.organicauthority.com/blog/organic/organic-food/high-fructose-corn-syrup-is-worse-than-sugar/)

cushioncrawler
03-30-2010, 03:47 PM
I reckon one should stay away from fruit. An apple a day duznt keep the doctor away -- a big apple a day can giv u diabetes. When i had a look the best fruit for lower fructose woz apricots -- unfortunately bananas are az bad az the rest (fructose), but i eat bananas anyhow -- and of course all of your pooofy gay flavourless fruits (that i dont like) are very low in fructose.
Nuts -- stick to nuts.
madMac.

Bambu
03-30-2010, 03:58 PM
Where ya gonna get a vitamin or piece of fruit during a pool match anyway? Lucky if I can sneak in a cigarette and a cup of coffee.

LAMas
03-30-2010, 04:29 PM
Apricots has fiber - thanks.
Fructose in fruits along with fiber is better than cane sugar sucrose.

Refined Sugar - The Sweetest poison of All...
Why Sugar Is Toxic To The Body
In 1957, Dr. William Coda Martin tried to answer the question: When is a food a food and when is it a poison? His working definition of "poison" was: "Medically: Any substance applied to the body, ingested or developed within the body, which causes or may cause disease. Physically: Any substance which inhibits the activity of a catalyst which is a minor substance, chemical or enzyme that activates a reaction."1 The dictionary gives an even broader definition for "poison": "to exert a harmful influence on, or to pervert".

Dr. Martin classified refined sugar as a poison because it has been depleted of its life forces, vitamins and minerals. "What is left consists of pure, refined carbohydrates. The body cannot utilize this refined starch and carbohydrate unless the depleted proteins, vitamins and minerals are present. Nature supplies these elements in each plant in quantities sufficient to metabolize the carbohydrate in that particular plant. There is no excess for other added carbohydrates. Incomplete carbohydrate metabolism results in the formation of 'toxic metabolite' such as pyruvic acid and abnormal sugars containing five carbon atoms. Pyruvic acid accumulates in the brain and nervous system and the abnormal sugars in the red blood cells. These toxic metabolites interfere with the respiration of the cells. They cannot get sufficient oxygen to survive and function normally. In time, some of the cells die. This interferes with the function of a part of the body and is the beginning of degenerative disease."2

Refined sugar is lethal when ingested by humans because it provides only that which nutritionists describe as "empty" or "naked" calories. It lacks the natural minerals which are present in the sugar beet or cane.

Alfie
03-30-2010, 07:31 PM
vitamin B, blood sugar...
Here are two links for the diabetics out there.

http://diabetes.webmd.com/news/20090608/metformin-linked-to-b12-deficiency

http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/Bl...b12_deficiency/ (http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/Blog/Amy-Campbell/metformin_and_risk_for_vitamin_b12_deficiency/)

LAMas
03-30-2010, 09:06 PM
True.
My wife takes B12 pills with her Metformin.

Fran Crimi
03-31-2010, 06:59 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Where ya gonna get a vitamin or piece of fruit during a pool match anyway? Lucky if I can sneak in a cigarette and a cup of coffee.</div></div>

/forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif

cushioncrawler
03-31-2010, 02:39 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Where ya gonna get a vitamin or piece of fruit during a pool match anyway? Lucky if I can sneak in a cigarette and a cup of coffee.</div></div>I hav a cup of tea for brekky (1/2 spoon of sugar) -- ditto for lunch -- and a big (uzually late) dinner.
This iz the exact opposite of what dieticians say -- they say brekky should be the main meal -- plus that u should hav 3 small meals not one big one -- plus that eating before bed iz bad.
Silly dieticians.
madMac.

Stretch
03-31-2010, 11:22 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Fran Crimi</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Where ya gonna get a vitamin or piece of fruit during a pool match anyway? Lucky if I can sneak in a cigarette and a cup of coffee.</div></div>

/forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif </div></div>

Hi Sis!! Hugz. It's been a while for sure. Didn't reolize you were posting. YEAH!

Still hitting them sweete with the cue and the advice i see. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif As a long time victom of adrenalin i can say that a good chew of gum does wonders. There were some studies that concluded that the jaw muscles actually dicipate stress and anxiaty significantly. It even lowered blood pressure. I see all kinds of atholetes chewing, there must be something to it. St.

Fran Crimi
04-01-2010, 06:32 PM
Stretch! Hey little brother ---- Nice to see you too. Good one about the gum. I didn't know that. Nick Varner was notorious for his gum-chewing.

JoeW
04-03-2010, 04:58 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">We have all felt the same feeling at one time or another. Heart racing, sweaty palms, jumbled thoughts in your head. When this happens, I always try to calm myself down. Sometimes it works, other times not.

The strange thing I can't really figure out is, sometimes I can get this to work in my favor. Sure I can choke it too, but other times I can step it up. I'd like to say the more important the match the better I play, but thats not always the case. I can't always control my game, or my thoughts.

In trying to make sense of it all, I can't. The best I can say is that there seems to be a fine line between negative and positive adrenaline(if there is such a thing).

Or, when I think I am getting "it" to work....am I merely playing well despite the nervousness? Does this all boil down to our simple fight or flight mechanism? I am starting to think so. Adrenaline from fear will drain your energy(flight). Adrenaline caused by a sense of urgency, can spark your will to succeed(fight).

</div></div>

Schachter and Singer (1962) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_factor_theory_of_emotion demonstrated in the 1960s that adrenaline enhances the emotions of unaware subjects. If the subject is angry they became more angry. If the subject was elated they became more so. Apparently the effect of adrenaline is to magnify whatever emotion is being displayed. These studies were done with mild levels of the chemical introduced and I do not know what the effect would be with a massive injection, though I suppose it would be similar.

The conclusion is that emotions follow behavior. If you act angry you will become more angry with the introduction of these types of chemicals. I conclude, from my own behavior and experience, that if you act intense (enhanced concentration) that you become more intense and this helps my game.

I think that we have all met people who can drop into a high state of concentration and others who find it difficult to get into that state. I think it is more a matter of training one's self to be able to intensely focus on command. This is not an easy traing assignment and needs to be re-trained on a periodic basis. I find that I do not play nearly as well in a casual game as in a competitive situation.

It seems to me that those who say there is a need for much tournament experience are really saying that there is a need for training in how to concentrate on command. When this is learned (and the irrelevent emtions are shed) one plays their best under any circumstances because adrenaline will assist one's play.

That ought to get a rise out of some people !

A reasonable introduction to the complexity of this topic can be found here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotion

Dollr
04-04-2010, 04:50 PM
Got to say, Adrenaline is my enemy at the table. I've done wonders over the years to control it from twittering my game out. With myself, any substantial rush of adrenaline causes my balance and stroke to go off the deep end. Often leaving my cue control in precise situations to be off an inch or two--as we all know can be disastrous. Bottom line, keep the adrenaline for the octagon and stay cool on the slate.

Qtec
04-06-2010, 01:35 AM
Interesting post Joe. I agree with much you have said but do you really think <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">emotions follow behavior. </div></div>?

Do you cry and then get sad?
Do you laugh and then think its funny?
Do you punch some one and then get angry?

Q.........BTW, this is my favourite subject and I have more to say on this.! I will be back. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

Great post. Lots to think about.

JoeW
04-06-2010, 09:31 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Interesting post Joe. I agree with much you have said but do you really think <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">emotions follow behavior. </div></div>?

Do you cry and then get sad?
Do you laugh and then think its funny?
Do you punch some one and then get angry?

Q.........BTW, this is my favourite subject and I have more to say on this.! I will be back. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

Great post. Lots to think about. </div></div>

Because emotions can follow behavior does not mean that emotions always follow behavior. I think that at times we find ourselves running and then have an emotional response that is consistent with the behavior. I also think that we can (at times) induce various emtions by exhibiting the associated behavior.

For the pool player this suggests a training procedure in which we associate an emotion with a behavior and this can be used to improve our game.

KellyStick
04-21-2010, 11:27 AM
I say it's your friend. My favorite place to be is where my heart rate is up a bit, my head starts to feel a little pressure and my eyes and brain get focused. I don't sit down and I don't take my eyes or brain off the game when my opponent is shooting. I don't want to talk to anyone. There is no time for being nervous because all of me is focused on the game. I am not thinking of the outcome of the game other than how am I going to beat my opponent. Note the difference between thinking ultimate outcome vs what do I need to do now to win. In other words not concerned with winning or losing but rather only with playing the game and doing what I have to do to win.

Some games are tough where you have a lousy lie and your opponent has an easier one. In the state above is when I have the best chance of coming up with the right strategy to turn the table and put me in the drivers seat.

This is a great feeling. When it's all over it takes a good 15-30 minutes to come down from this sort of high and at least an hour before I could think about sleeping.

ratta
04-28-2010, 11:32 AM
A bit adrenaline is for sure helpful- then you ll pay for sure the attention each shot needs! Even if you re a bit nervous- both will force you to pay maximum concentration to your game.

lg from overseas
Ingo