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View Full Version : LMAO! Repubs Changing Repeal Tune Already???



Gayle in MD
03-31-2010, 04:42 AM
<span style="color: #000066">Gee, guess they finally had someone look up the law. </span> /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">WASHINGTON — Top Republicans are increasingly worried that GOP candidates this fall might be burned by a fire that's roaring through the conservative base: demand for the repeal of President Barack Obama's new health care law.

It's fine to criticize the health law and the way Democrats pushed it through Congress without a single GOP vote, these party leaders say. But focusing on its outright repeal carries two big risks.

Repeal is politically and legally unlikely, and grass-roots activists may feel disillusioned by a failed crusade. More important, say strategists from both parties, a fiercely repeal-the-bill stance might prove far less popular in a general election than in a conservative-dominated GOP primary, especially in states such as Illinois and California.

Democrats are counting on that scenario. They say more Americans will learn of the new law's benefits over time and anger over its messy legislative pedigree will fade. For months, Democrats have eagerly catalogued Republican congressional candidates who pledge to repeal the health care law, vowing to make them pay in November.

<span style='font-size: 26pt'>Republican leaders are stepping cautiously, wary of angering staunchly conservative voters bent on repealing the new law. In recent public comments, they have quietly played down the notion of repealing the law while emphasizing claims that it will hurt jobs, the economy and the deficit.</span>Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, who chairs the committee responsible for electing GOP senators this fall, said in an interview, "The focus really should be on the misplaced priorities of the administration" and Congress' Democratic leaders.

"The No. 1 concern of the public is jobs and people losing their homes," he said. "The administration has been obsessing on this health care bill."

Asked if he advises Republican Senate candidates to call for repealing the law, Cornyn said:<span style='font-size: 26pt'> "Candidates are going to test the winds in their own states. ... In some places, the health care bill is more popular than others."</span>On Tuesday, Cornyn issued a 1,280-word campaign memo that mentioned "repeal" only once. It did not advocate repeal but noted that in a recent poll, "46 percent of respondents support a full repeal" of the health law.

<span style='font-size: 26pt'>Three weeks ago, Cornyn told reporters he thought GOP Senate candidates would and should run on a platform of repealing the legislation.</span>Cornyn and others increasingly are focused on several corporations' claims that a provision of the new law that cancels a tax benefit will hurt profits and hiring. This approach places a greater premium on pivoting to the economy instead of dwelling on the legalistic process of trying to repeal the complex law.

"The health care debate provides a natural segue into talking about the economy and jobs," said Nicklaus Simpson, spokesman for the Senate Republican Conference, a policy group.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which strongly opposed the health bill's passage, said Tuesday, "While some discuss repeal, the U.S. Chamber believes a more effective approach is to work through all available and appropriate avenues – regulatory, legislative, legal and political – to fix the bill's flaws and minimize its harmful impacts."

Obama said last week he would relish a Republican bid to repeal the new law.

"My attitude is, go for it," Obama said in Iowa on Friday. "If these congressmen in Washington want to come here in Iowa and tell small-business owners that they plan to take away their tax credits and essentially raise their taxes, be my guest."

Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey, who chairs the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, said in an interview that his team began months ago pressing Republican candidates to state whether they support repeal of the health care legislation. Most of them have, and Democrats predict such support will prove unpopular this fall.

<span style='font-size: 26pt'>"We believe the issue of repeal is one that puts the Republicans in a pretty sticky place," Menendez said. "You never want to wage a campaign telling voters you want to take something away from them."</span>
In Illinois, where there's a spirited battle to fill the Senate seat Obama once held, Democrats seem to have hit a nerve by attacking Republican nominee Mark Kirk's pledge to try to repeal the health law. Two weeks ago, Kirk said he would <span style='font-size: 17pt'>"lead the effort" to repeal the measure.</span>
On Tuesday, when asked repeatedly by reporters whether he still wants it repealed, Kirk would say only that he opposes the new taxes and Medicare cuts associated with the law.

Republican strategist Kevin Madden said the repeal message is "a call to action" that excites many conservative voters, who will be important in November. But the risk of talking only about repeal, he said, "is you only define your position by what you're against."

Madden said GOP candidates should advocate "repeal and reform," which will let them discuss alternative ways to control health care expenses, quality and access. <span style='font-size: 26pt'>Because an actual repeal is unlikely, he said, candidates should not get bogged down in the mechanics of how it might work, and focus instead on issues such as costs.</span>
"The legislative track is largely finished," Madden said.

<span style='font-size: 20pt'>Menendez said Democrats in many states will ask their GOP opponents why they want to restore insurance companies' ability to deny coverage to people with medical problems and to young adults who otherwise can stay on their parents' health plans until age 26.</span>
<span style='font-size: 20pt'>Candidates seeking the GOP nominations in many states, Menendez said, "are facing tremendous pressure from the tea party, from the party base" to embrace a position that could hurt them when more independent and moderate voters go to the polls in the general election.</span>
<span style='font-size: 14pt'>But several conservative groups are adamant about trying to repeal the new law, and they have attacked GOP candidates who refuse to join them. The Club for Growth launched a "Repeal It" campaign in January, and is urging supporters to back only those candidates who make the pledge.</span>
Many Republicans facing competitive Senate primaries have signed up, even if they might confront a far more moderate electorate in the general election.

"I've taken the pledge to repeal the law and replace it with true reform that will increase quality and lower costs," said Carly Fiorina, vying for the GOP nomination to challenge Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer in California.

</div></div>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/03/31/health-care-repeal-campai_n_519642.html


<span style="color: #000066">LMAO....whatcha call painted into a corner! BWA HA HA HA.... </span>

LWW
03-31-2010, 05:11 AM
So your point is the republicans are cowards.

I agree.

LWW

Sev
03-31-2010, 07:04 AM
Actually another strategy is to not fund the bill.

However as more and more unintended consequences of the bill are revealed there may very well be a ground swell against the legislation.

Its telling that Washington is attempting to intimidate John Deere, Caterpillar, AT&T, Verizon, Valero, A-K Steel and others that have expressed their findings of what the legislation will cost them.

They have fired a warning shot. "You may see production move over seas."

Imagine the fallout from those layoffs.

pooltchr
03-31-2010, 08:46 AM
In addition, the insurance industry has already assured everyone that the law is going to result in rate increases for the public.

I don't think repeal is the answer, but we must get people into Washington as quickly as possible who will actually fix this horrible law.

Steve

cushioncrawler
03-31-2010, 02:47 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">.....Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, who chairs the committee responsible for electing GOP senators this fall, said in an interview, "The focus really should be on the misplaced priorities of the administration" and Congress' Democratic leaders.
"The No. 1 concern of the public is jobs and people losing their homes," he said. "The administration has been obsessing on this health care bill."</div></div>Hmmmmmm -- I would hav thort that in good times the No1 reason for loozing your home woz medical bills.
madMac.

llotter
03-31-2010, 03:27 PM
Well, in a free society citizens have no right to healthcare or a home so no rights lost.

pooltchr
03-31-2010, 03:37 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hmmmmmm -- I would hav thort that in good times the No1 reason for loozing your home woz medical bills.
madMac. </div></div>

But we are NOT in good times, and the huge increase in people losing their homes is not because of healthcare...it's UNEMPLOYMENT.

So why has the number one priority for the past 14 months been healthcare, and not jobs???

Seems as if this administration has a serious problem with misplaced priorities.

Steve

pooltchr
03-31-2010, 03:41 PM
For that matter, I wonder why their number one priority has been to spend more money that any president in history, rather than doing the one thing that could help the economy the most, and cut their own spending, downsize the federal government, and get back to doing what they are supposed to do..

Our homeland security is more concerned about going after a christian militia group,, that they are about stopping the murder of our citizens by illegal aliens along the boarder.

Steve

Sev
03-31-2010, 07:44 PM
If they wanted to fix the cost of health care it would not have taken 3000 pages to do it. And they would not be sneaking in things like the student loan program.

LAMas
04-01-2010, 12:47 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">In addition, the insurance industry has already assured everyone that the law is going to result in rate increases for the public.

I don't think repeal is the answer, but we must get people into Washington as quickly as possible who will actually fix this horrible law.

Steve </div></div>

Maybe the Doctors have a better idea:

Doctors Sue to Overturn the Health Care Bill
March 29th, 2010 The Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS) became the first medical society to sue to overturn the newly enacted health care bill, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). AAPS sued Friday in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia (AAPS v. Sebelius et al.).
“If the PPACA goes unchallenged, then it spells the end of freedom in medicine as we know it,” observed Jane Orient, M.D., the Executive Director of AAPS. “Courts should not allow this massive intrusion into the practice of medicine and the rights of patients.”

“There will be a dire shortage of physicians if the PPACA becomes effective and is not overturned by the courts.”

The PPACA requires most Americans to buy government-approved insurance starting in 2014, or face stiff penalties. Insurance company executives will be enriched by this requirement, but it violates the Fifth Amendment protection against the government forcing one person to pay cash to another. AAPS is the first to assert this important constitutional claim.

The PPACA also violates the Tenth Amendment, the Commerce Clause, and the provisions authorizing taxation. The Taxing and Spending power cannot be invoked, as the premiums go to private insurance companies. The traditional sovereignty of the States over the practice of medicine is destroyed by the PPACA.

AAPS notes that in scoring the proposal the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) was bound by assumptions imposed by Congress, including the ability to “save” $500 billion in Medicare, and to redirect $50 billion from Social Security. HHS Secretary Sebelius stated that PPACA would reduce the federal deficit, knowing the opposite to be true if these assumptions are unrealistic.

AAPS asks the Court to enjoin the government from promulgating or enforcing insurance mandates and require HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and Social Security Commissioner Michael Astrue to provide the Court with an accounting of Medicare and Social Security solvency.

Congress recognized that PPACA cannot be funded without the insurance mandates, and will become unenforceable without them.

Court action is necessary “to preserve individual liberty” and “to prevent PPACA from bankrupting the United States generally and Medicare and Social Security specifically,” AAPS stated.

AAPS is a voice for patient and physician independence since 1943. The complaint and more information about the suit are posted at http://www.aapsonline.org/hhslawsuit

LAMas
04-01-2010, 12:54 AM
Quote from below:

"Over 50% of physicians who responded predict that a health reform would cause the quality of medical care to deteriorate in America."

Doctors to quit in droves if and when this health care bill is passed
March 17, 1:58 Survey Conducted By The Medicus Firm
These are findings of The Medicus Firm, a national physician search firm, that surveyed 1000 doctors in order to get their feelings on the proposed health care reform that is now before the House. If House Democrats push this legislation through, what might happen to the pool of available doctors? These are some of the results, courtesy of The Medicus Firm:

"24.7% of physicians stated that they would "retire early" if a public option is implemented";

"An additional 21.0% of respondents stated that they would quit practicing medicine, even though they are nowhere near retirement":

The total was 45.7% of respondents indicating they would leave the practice of medicine if a public option is enacted. If no public option were involved in a final version, the 45.7% would drop to ONLY 33%.

"Over 50% of physicians who responded predict that a health reform would cause the quality of medical care to deteriorate in America."

Finally, Kevin Perpetua, Managing Partner for The Medicus Firm's Atlanta division says "Many physicians feel that they cannot continue to practice if patient loads increase while pay decreases. The overwhelming prediction from physicians is that health reform, if implemented inappropriately, could create a detrimental combination of circumstances, and result in an environment in which it is not possible for most physicians to continue practicing medicine. With an average debt of $140,000, and many graduates approaching a quarter of a million dollars in school loans, being a doctor is becoming less and less feasible..."

Gayle in MD
04-01-2010, 05:05 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">.....Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, who chairs the committee responsible for electing GOP senators this fall, said in an interview, "The focus really should be on the misplaced priorities of the administration" and Congress' Democratic leaders.
"The No. 1 concern of the public is jobs and people losing their homes," he said. "The administration has been obsessing on this health care bill."</div></div>Hmmmmmm -- I would hav thort that in good times the No1 reason for loozing your home woz medical bills.
madMac. </div></div>

<span style="color: #000066">You're exactly right, Max, since 62% of the foreclosures were a result of people becoming ill, and being dropped by their health insurance provider, or not getting the promised coverage....or one spouse lost a job, and the whole family lost health cares, bottom line, health care costs, and the insurance industry's unfair practices.

Now, believe it or not, Republicans are indicating that they are going to fight against tighter regulations on the banks, and against consumer protection reforms!

The right still does not get it. Our Middle Class is being smothered out because of Republican Tax policies, that favor the wealthy, Republicans failing to address oil, insurance, banking, health and phramaceutical industries gouging the public, while taking millions upon millions in CEO bonuses and salaries.

Economic charts prove this is alwasy the result of Republican Administrations. They are government charts.

A free market that does not protect the consumer against fraud, is not a free market at all, it's a racket.

I hope Republicans run on this absurd promise os repealing the Health Care Bill. Over the summer, as more Americans are aided by some of the great reforms, Republicans pseudo promise will become more and more unpopular.

Students, retirees, and millions of families in our country are going to finally be supported against unfair business practices by the insurance, pharmaceutical and health industries...BTW, did you know that it is a fact that in clinics owned by doctors who own the diagnostic equipment, have approximatly 30 to 40% more diagnostic tests? The hypochondriac wealthy patients on cadillac plans, who want non stop testing, were being subsidized by all of the rest of us. The irresponsible, who didn't bother to get health coverage at all, were also on our tab....

The reforms are good, more coverage, and cheaper prices. Insurance has already backed down on their threats....just two days ago.

Good!

G.</span>

pooltchr
04-01-2010, 07:50 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
The reforms are good, more coverage, and cheaper prices.
Good!

G. </div></div>

Don't forget.....fewer doctors which means less availability for all those newly covered people!
And you be sure to let us know how those "cheaper prices" actually work out!

Steve

cushioncrawler
04-01-2010, 04:15 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">....A free market that does not protect the consumer against fraud, is not a free market at all, it's a racket......</div></div>Gayle -- yes, the usofa suppozed free enterprize system iz a racket -- even with suppozed lawz. Free enterprize iz the last thing that big-bizness wants. Free gov too. Free people too. Free speech too.
madMac.

pooltchr
04-01-2010, 04:35 PM
You've inspired me to coin a new word...cushienomics...the totally off the wall economic theories that have no relevence whatsoever!

Steve

Gayle in MD
04-03-2010, 06:52 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">....A free market that does not protect the consumer against fraud, is not a free market at all, it's a racket......</div></div>Gayle -- yes, the usofa suppozed free enterprize system iz a racket -- even with suppozed lawz. Free enterprize iz the last thing that big-bizness wants. Free gov too. Free people too. Free speech too.
madMac. </div></div>

You are quite correct, Mac. And the whiners we are hearing are the same economic geniuses who wrote that debts didn't matter under Goerge Bush!

They touted "The Free Market" while Bush was subsidizing corporations which outsourced American Jobs, and accused me of protectionism while I was bashing him for it.

Gross ignorance to whine when a President like president Obama spends money to rebuild a completely collapsed economy left over from Bush, invests in green jobs which cannot be outsourced, spends money to prevent the on-going of corporate theft, and predatory practices by insurance and banking, which were already going up on fees at an outlandish rate, and intended to continue gouging the American public.

Yet here they all are, the Bush supporters, who insutled all of us who warned that he would ruin our economy with his tax cuts during war time, and his appointing of incompetents, to economic oversight, of the wars, and of the banking and insurance industries.

They can't stand their own history! Just like Rove, who turned red when I made a fool of him on national television!

He lost it!!!


LMAO!

G.

Irrelevance personified!

G.

cushioncrawler
04-03-2010, 08:10 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You've inspired me to coin a new word ...cushienomics... the totally off the wall economic theories that have no relevence whatsoever! Steve</div></div>Steve -- I hav developed most of my ekonomix ideas out by myself. But i did get a bit of help from keynes and hitler and samuelson, mostly hitler.
U are korrekt -- good ekonomix needs a new name to keep it well clear of krappynomix (which stinx).
My ekonomix iz based on full kontrol of most prices and most wages etc by gov. And it iz based on full employment. And free enterprize. And good efficiency. And good rewards. And small gov.
..... Goodynomix.
..... Kontrolenomix.
..... Hitlernomix.
madMac.

sack316
04-03-2010, 08:21 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You've inspired me to coin a new word ...cushienomics... the totally off the wall economic theories that have no relevence whatsoever! Steve</div></div>Steve -- I hav developed most of my ekonomix ideas out by myself. But i did get a bit of help from keynes and hitler and samuelson, mostly hitler.
U are korrekt -- good ekonomix needs a new name to keep it well clear of krappynomix (which stinx).
My ekonomix iz based on <span style='font-size: 14pt'><u>full kontrol of most prices and most wages etc by gov.</u></span> And it iz based on full employment. <span style='font-size: 14pt'><u>And free enterprize.</u></span> And good efficiency. And good rewards. And small gov.
..... Goodynomix.
..... Kontrolenomix.
..... Hitlernomix.
madMac.


</div></div>

Contradictory?

Sack

cushioncrawler
04-04-2010, 02:27 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: sack316</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Contradictory?</div></div>Sack -- No so. Imagine how well free enterprise would work if we got rid of unions and the associated wastage etc.
Bizness would be free to lower prices, ie az efficiency grows.
Oh, i nearly forgot -- zero imports would be the goal.
And zero population growth. No. A say -1% growth.
If only i were King.
MacRex.

sack316
04-04-2010, 08:08 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Sack -- No so. Imagine how well free enterprise would work if we got rid of unions and the associated wastage etc.</div></div>

Now that part I could go for!

Sack