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Gayle in MD
03-31-2010, 12:08 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">March 29, 2010, 4:14 pm
From Rage to Relief: View From a Nurse’s Station
By THERESA BROWN, R.N.

Several weeks ago on the hospital floor where I’m a nurse, we had a V.I.P. patient whose spouse expected, and got, the red-carpet treatment. The patient’s spouse made many demands, but what struck most of us as particularly galling was the meal service both received. Day after day, meal after meal, a hospital employee wheeled a china-laden cart into that patient’s room. It looked like room service at a fancy hotel.

Each time one of these splendid repasts came to the floor, work would stop while we watched the cart roll past the large metal service container stacked with trays that held the other patients’ meals.

“I find that really distasteful,” I found myself muttering as the cart went by.

Another staff member who overheard me said, “You’re not the only one who feels that way.”

The rage felt by the nurses on the floor was palpable. “Remember Mr. So-and-So who had no money at all — his wife couldn’t get a free meal,” one remarked.

Designating certain patients as V.I.P.’s is common enough in many hospitals, and typically people don’t pay extra for it. But no one liked the idea that one patient, as a result of connections and wealth, would be treated so much better than the others. And yet, as nurses we also know that the health insurance system we have lived with for years apportions medical care in just the same way.

Some patients can afford the best insurance, while others cannot afford any at all, or are denied insurance because of pre-existing medical conditions, or lose insurance coverage when their cap on benefits is reached. And while the new health care legislation will not erase all inequalities, many more people will now be able to afford insurance, or find better and less expensive insurance from insurance exchanges, and ultimately get better care.

Patients like the woman who faced a $600 co-pay each time she came to our hospital and, because she had leukemia, she had to come often. It was money she didn’t have. “We have lousy insurance,” she told me.

Another patient had to have CT scans done off site, where it was less expensive, because he was paying for the scans himself.

In the months of debate leading to the vote on health care, we heard these stories over and over, along with the even more tragic stories of seriously ill patients dropped by their insurance companies, or the people who died for lack of insurance to pay for treatments.

These vast disparities in health care coverage trouble me because they compromise, in a subtle but real way, my ability to do my best work as a nurse.

The most important job of any nurse is to be a patient advocate. If physicians are known by the phrase, “First, do no harm,” nursing might be characterized as “Above all, do good.” If the best care possible, or at times any care beyond the emergency room, is out of reach for some patients because they have inadequate insurance, or none, then the nurse’s role as patient advocate becomes a sham.

The American Nurses Association strongly supported the health care overhaul effort because, as the organization’s president, Rebecca M. Patton, explained, “I have all the conviction in my heart and in my brain that what was passed will improve health care for all.”

Crucial provisions of the bill provide money for the education of advanced practice nurses, guaranteeing that more patients in need of primary care will benefit from nurse-oriented holistic care.

Of course, the bill is not perfect, and many of the nurses I work with do not think it’s a good thing. They worry that involving government in our private health insurance system will create even worse problems than we have now.

We’ll have to see how it plays out. But for me, working on the front lines of health care, passage of this bill feels like a relief. Relief that a patient will not have to worry about affording the treatment needed to stop her cancer. Relief that medication decisions will be based on effectiveness and not cost. Relief that I can educate patients about the drugs they need without fretting that they won’t take them if they can’t afford them.

Because here’s the bottom line: All patients are very important people, and they deserve the best modern health care. In the current system, some patients eat elegantly prepared food off china dishes, while others get nothing at all. I’m a nurse; I want to know that all my patients get a decent meal.
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Under
03-31-2010, 12:58 PM
Nice sad story, signifying nothing.

So a VIP can afford to pay extra. That is a definition of a VIP. Look at actors they do this all the time. So do Canadian Politicans who are checking in for an operation they cannot get in Canada.

A family member would certainly want something to eat that was comparrable to what they normally eat.

The hospital, is in the food business. But, you already knew that.

LWW
03-31-2010, 01:14 PM
WOW!

People paid for fancy meals and got them.

OH, THE HUMANITY!

LWW

pooltchr
03-31-2010, 01:53 PM
Personally, I'm outraged when I eat dinner at McDonalds and see people across the street eating at Ruth's Chris! It's just not <span style='font-size: 17pt'>fair!</span>

Steve

Bobbyrx
03-31-2010, 01:53 PM
Not trying to pick the article apart, because I don't really know what the health care bill will do, especially to me, owning a pharmacy. That's why I havn't gotten into this debate too much. I just wish we didn't have to wait until 2014 to find out. Anyway, this paragraph got my attention:
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Crucial provisions of the bill provide money for the education of advanced practice nurses, guaranteeing that more patients in need of primary care will benefit from nurse-oriented holistic care.
</div></div>

I didn't know what nurse-oriented holistic care was so I of course googled and got this explanation from the AHNA:
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Holistic Nursing is defined as all nursing practice that has healing the whole person as its goal. (American Holistic Nurses' Association, 1998, Description of Holistic Nursing). Holistic Nursing is further defined as practice that draws on nursing knowledge, theories, expertise and intuition to guide nurses in becoming therapeutic partners with clients in strengthening clients' response to facilitate the healing process and achieve wholeness. The practice of Holistic Nursing is grounded in nursing theory -- fully recognizing that there are two views in the profession regarding holism (the view that defines the whole in terms of component parts -- bio-psych-social-spiritual -- believing that the whole is greater than these parts; and the view that defines the whole as an irreducible unit). Different from other nursing practice, the practice of Holistic Nursing requires the nurse to integrate self-care and self-responsibility into his or her own life and to strive for an awareness of the interconnectedness of individuals to the human and global community. Thus, Holistic Nursing as a Specialty gives voice and a context to a specialty identified by the philosophy and practices of the nurse

</div></div>

I still don't know what it means...... /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif

Under
03-31-2010, 02:00 PM
They will not be in the normally known sense nursing.

They will be doing all the other feel good advise and family council when their dearest one is shielded from actual medical care. Look up death council.

pooltchr
03-31-2010, 02:00 PM
What it means is when someone isn't able to get to see a doctor, there will be a nurse there to teach them how to take care of themselves!

Steve

sack316
03-31-2010, 05:26 PM
I got another view from a nurses station. An ex gf who is a lab tech that just lost her job cuz the doc is shutting down the practice. I'll leave "why" to the imagination.

Sack

pooltchr
03-31-2010, 05:32 PM
Couldn't be due to the HC law...we've been told right here that every doctor thinks it's a great thing.

/forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

Steve

LWW
03-31-2010, 05:48 PM
My wife's doc is also retiring after the passage of this bill.

LWW

Gayle in MD
04-01-2010, 06:10 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bobbyrx</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Not trying to pick the article apart, because I don't really know what the health care bill will do, especially to me, owning a pharmacy. That's why I havn't gotten into this debate too much. I just wish we didn't have to wait until 2014 to find out. Anyway, this paragraph got my attention:
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Crucial provisions of the bill provide money for the education of advanced practice nurses, guaranteeing that more patients in need of primary care will benefit from nurse-oriented holistic care.
</div></div>

<span style="color: #000066">What it means is that along with primary care, holistic care is provided. Holistic medicine is very important for some patients. Teaching meditation, for example, can bring a person's blood pressure back to normal, as has been proven, when one meditates daily, (see studies included in the book, The Relaxation Response and thereby preventing the need for expensive medications, for example. The same is true for people like myself, living with a pinched nerve in the neck area, and having been taught meditation, and stretching exercises, transcendental therapy, all allow me to live my life using almost no pain killers when my neck acts up.

These therapies are ancient therapies, and very valuable in aiding many health problems. There is a great deal of research available on the subject. These are just a few examples, I'm giving, in general, though, the holistic approach is a whole body, mind approach to wellness. My aunt, studied mediataion, and was able to get entirely off her blood pressure medication, by simply learning meditation.

Hope this helps....

G.</span>

I didn't know what nurse-oriented holistic care was so I of course googled and got this explanation from the AHNA:
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Holistic Nursing is defined as all nursing practice that has healing the whole person as its goal. (American Holistic Nurses' Association, 1998, Description of Holistic Nursing). Holistic Nursing is further defined as practice that draws on nursing knowledge, theories, expertise and intuition to guide nurses in becoming therapeutic partners with clients in strengthening clients' response to facilitate the healing process and achieve wholeness. The practice of Holistic Nursing is grounded in nursing theory -- fully recognizing that there are two views in the profession regarding holism (the view that defines the whole in terms of component parts -- bio-psych-social-spiritual -- believing that the whole is greater than these parts; and the view that defines the whole as an irreducible unit). Different from other nursing practice, the practice of Holistic Nursing requires the nurse to integrate self-care and self-responsibility into his or her own life and to strive for an awareness of the interconnectedness of individuals to the human and global community. Thus, Holistic Nursing as a Specialty gives voice and a context to a specialty identified by the philosophy and practices of the nurse

</div></div>

I still don't know what it means...... /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif </div></div>

Under
04-01-2010, 06:26 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Ruth Chris.

Steak so good, it will make a cowboy cry. </div></div>

It is outstanding. Break out that Franklin or Grant and on occasion walk across the street.

You might rub elbows with the VIP's from the Hospital.