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View Full Version : A demokook in congress expresses their fear.



LWW
04-01-2010, 03:52 PM
I have to hand it to the demokooks ... people of this intellectual caliber are incredibly rare.

If you are short on time, move the video to 0:45 and listen trough 1:20 ... and I warn you, do not be drinking anything you don't want to spew on your monitor with laughter when you hear their concern:

>>>CLICK HERE AND PREPARE TO BE AMAZED<<< (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsFsn8ekyhw&feature=player_embedded#at=59)

LWW

pooltchr
04-01-2010, 04:31 PM
If anyone could do it, it would be 8,000 marines...but even they would need some major intervention from God to accomplish it! LOL

I'm more interested in what kind of idiots actually voted for this guy. He can't speak, obviously can't think very well, and seems to be pretty much clueless. And these are our elected leaders.

I have a better idea....let's send 8,000 marines to the capital in DC and put his theory to a test!!!!

Steve

cushioncrawler
04-01-2010, 05:34 PM
Hank Johnson (D-Fulcrum) explains his comments about Guam & U.S. Marines
April 1, 2010 14:08 pm

by Pete Randall · 14 comments

It was all a metaphor, you see.

In an e-mail to 11Alive News, Johnson’s office said the statement was a metaphor to describe Guam’s ecosystem.

“I wasn’t suggesting that the island of Guam would literally tip over,” Johnson said in the e-mailed statement. “I was using a metaphor to say that with the addition of 8,000 Marines and their dependents – an additional 80,000 people during peak construction on the tiny island with a population of 180,000 – could be a tipping point which could adversely affect the island’s fragile ecosystem and could overburden its overstressed infrastructure.”

“Having traveled to Guam last year, I saw firsthand how this beautiful – but vulnerable island – could easily become overburdened, and I was simply voicing my concerns that the addition of that many people could tip the delicate balance and do permanent harm to Guam,” Johnson said.

Johnson then presented gripping video evidence he had recently personally filmed of how “climate change” can adversely affect humanity.

pooltchr
04-01-2010, 05:43 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hank Johnson (D-Fulcrum) explains his comments about Guam & U.S. Marines
April 1, 2010 14:08 pm

by Pete Randall · 14 comments

It was all a metaphor, you see.

In an e-mail to 11Alive News, Johnson’s office said the statement was a metaphor to describe Guam’s ecosystem.

“I wasn’t suggesting that the island of Guam would literally tip over,” Johnson said in the e-mailed statement. “I was using a metaphor to say that with the addition of 8,000 Marines and their dependents – an additional 80,000 people during peak construction on the tiny island with a population of 180,000 – could be a tipping point which could adversely affect the island’s fragile ecosystem and could overburden its overstressed infrastructure.”

“Having traveled to Guam last year, I saw firsthand how this beautiful – but vulnerable island – could easily become overburdened, and I was simply voicing my concerns that the addition of that many people could tip the delicate balance and do permanent harm to Guam,” Johnson said.

Johnson then presented gripping video evidence he had recently personally filmed of how “climate change” can adversely affect humanity.
</div></div>

After having listened to this guy speak, I have serious doubts that he actually wrote the above words himself. He doesn't seem to have enough command of the English language to use that many multi-sylable words in one paragraph.

This is what you get, when you have people who say they will not vote for a member of one party under any circumstances...or that are just stupid enough to vote straight party without knowing what or who they are voting for.

Steve

Under
04-01-2010, 05:49 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Congressman Hank Johnson, while turning his body side at a 45 degree angle with the ground, to help the Admiral understand what tipping over would look like.
The fear is the island will tip over and capsize. </div></div>
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Admiral
We don't anticipate that. </div></div>

The situation presents a tough choice. After much sole searching, I will side with the Admiral.

Hank is another reason we should tip him over along with the other ignorant b*stards who populate Washington.

Look at it again. Amazing that a person with that level of intelligence could survive to middle age.

cushioncrawler
04-01-2010, 05:59 PM
Sōka Gakkai (創価学会?) ("Value-Creation Society") is a lay Buddhist organization, derived from Nichiren Buddhism. Founding President Tsunesaburo Makiguchi first used the term Sōka Kyoiku Gakkai (Value Creation Educational Society) in 1930 when he published his book The Theory of Value-Creating Pedagogy. He asserted that the purpose of education should not be mere training for workers for Japan’s growing industrial machine, but the development of the human ability to create “value” (i.e., gain, beauty and social good) in their daily lives. His humanistic, student-centered views and defense of religious freedom often brought him into conflict with authority. Arrested with other top Sōka Gakkai leaders in 1943 as a “thought criminal” for his unyielding opposition to the militarist regime and its forced imposition of state-sponsored religion, Makiguchi died in prison at the age of 73 in November 1944.

Makiguchi’s close disciple, Josei Toda, survived the ordeal and was released from a Tokyo prison just weeks before the world’s first use of the atomic bomb in July 1945. Determined to rebuild the Sōka Gakkai, Toda set about to develop its membership from less than 3,000 families when he assumed the presidency in 1951 to more than 750,000 before his death in 1958, thereby spreading the movement across Japan and throughout society. The Sōka Gakkai’s remarkable growth stemmed from its commitment to help people overcome their suffering in the postwar chaos.

On May 3, 1960, Daisaku Ikeda became the third president. Within six months, he established chapters in the United States and South American countries, followed a year later by organizations in nine European countries. He continues to provide leadership for the global SGI organization, which now includes members in more than 190 countries and territories. Ikeda has founded a number of educational and cultural institutions that seek to foster the values of peace, culture and education.

Sōka Gakkai International (SGI), the umbrella organization, was founded in 1975 and characterizes its organization as both a support network for practitioners of Nichiren Buddhism and as a global movement for peace, education, and cultural exchange.

The SGI is based on the teachings and philosophy of Nichiren Buddhism, which places the highest emphasis on the sanctity of life. Members seek, through their practice of Buddhism, to develop the ability to live with confidence, to create value in any circumstance and to contribute to the well-being of friends, family and community.

Their philosophy is rooted in the concept of "human revolution," a process of inner transformation through Buddhist practice. They believe that it is a process that leads one to develop their character and to act not only for our personal fulfillment but also for the betterment of society.

They believe that happiness is being able to experience profound joy that comes from never being defeated by any problem in life.

The SGI-USA is the American branch of the SGI network, with more than 2,600 neighborhood discussion groups and nearly 100 SGI-USA centers throughout the country.

The core activity for all SGI-USA members is the neighborhood discussion meeting. These informal gatherings bring people together for Buddhist prayer, study, sharing and discussion of ways Buddhism can be applied to the challenges of daily living.

cushioncrawler
04-01-2010, 06:00 PM
Personal life
Johnson graduated from Clark College (now Clark Atlanta University) in 1976, was a member of Omega Psi Phi Kappa Alpha Alpha Chapter, Decatur, GA, and Texas Southern University's Thurgood Marshall School of Law in Houston in 1979; he practiced law in Decatur, Georgia for more than 25 years.

He was elected to the DeKalb County Commission in 2000 and served two terms. Prior to his service on the Commission, he worked as an Associate Magistrate Judge for ten years.[4]

Johnson's wife, Mereda Davis Johnson, is also an attorney; they have two children.

Johnson grew up in Washington, D.C. His father worked for the Bureau of Prisons and was the director of classifications and paroles, up to that time, the highest ranking African American in the bureau.[5]

In December of 2009, Johnson revealed that he had been battling Hepatitis C for over a decade. He said that he had been declared free of the virus, but his liver suffered damage which has resulted in long-term health issues.[6]

Johnson is a practicing Buddhist and is a member of Soka Gakkai International.

cushioncrawler
04-01-2010, 06:03 PM
The 4th is one of the most Democratic districts in the South, and among Georgia districts, only the neighboring 5th is considered more Democratic. It is so heavily Democratic that Johnson's primary victory all but assured him of becoming the district's third congressman (it was created as the 11th in 1993 and renumbered the 4th in 1997). In November, he trounced the Republican candidate, Catherine Davis, with 76% of the vote — one of the largest percentages for a Democrat in a contested election, and the largest in the history of the district. He was unopposed for reelection in 2008; given the 4th's heavy Democratic tilt it is not likely he will face serious Republican opposition in the foreseeable future.

On October 6, 2006, Congressional Quarterly's "On Their Way," which features promising candidates soon-to-arrive in Washington, featured Johnson.[9]

Online presence
Johnson's aggressive use of the internet to court supporters and attract national attention to the 2006 race in which he challenged and defeated Cynthia McKinney was noted by national political media. The National Journal wrote that of all Congressional candidates nationwide in 2006, "Johnson had the most unique blog strategy by far."[10]

The National Journal ranked Johnson's use of the internet to defeat McKinney -- and the broader trend of challengers using the blogosphere to challenge entrenched incumbents -- as the third most significant blog-related story of 2006.[11]

Johnson was the first Congressional candidate invited to blog for The Hill's Congress Blog, typically reserved for Members of Congress.[12] "I'm tremendously excited about the opportunity to use this unique medium to strengthen democracy by increasing open interaction between constituents and candidates," Johnson wrote. "I hope to provide you with an inside view of this hotly-contested, high stakes runoff."

Congressional career
On January 25, 2007, Johnson responded to U.S. President George W. Bush's State of the Union address by criticizing the war in Iraq, saying "This war has proven to be one of the gravest missteps in the recent history of our country. It is time for President Bush to face the music and respond to the urgent demands of a frustrated country."[13]

On February 8, 2007, Johnson introduced his first bill: a resolution requesting that the Secretary of Defense Robert Gates take U.S. troops off of street patrol duty in Iraq. "There is no military solution for the civil war in Iraq," said Johnson, "It is time for Iraqi troops, who have been trained, to assume responsibility for patrolling their own streets. Clearly, deploying our troops this way has only escalated the number of U.S. casualties, and this must stop."[14] According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Johnson's resolution was "interesting in that it goes beyond broad directives and proposes something very specific."[15]

On March 23, 2007, Johnson voted to pass H.R. 1591, "The U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans’ Health, and Iraq Accountability Act."[16] This bill provided $124 billion for military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and required that President George W. Bush withdraw American forces from Iraq by mid-2008. Johnson attracted attention by blogging about his decision to vote for the bill.[17]

On May 24, 2007, Johnson voted to cut funding for the Iraq War that did not include binding requirements of the Iraqi government and made no provisions for the redeployment of American armed forces from Iraq.[18].

Johnson voted against the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) bailout bill in November, 2008.

He voted in favor of the Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the stimulus package supported by Democrats in Congress and President Barack Obama.

In 2007, Johnson's H.Con.Res.80, a resolution calling for peaceful resolution to the Ugandan civil war between the Government of Uganda and the Lord's Resistance Army, unanimously passed the House and Senate. Johnson's first successful piece of legislation, it was jointly introduced in the Senate by Democratic Senator Russ Feingold and Republican Senator Sam Brownback.

In 2009, Johnson demanded censure of Rep. Joe Wilson's "you lie" remark, arguing that the comment had an unseen racial undertone and that, if Wilson was not formally rebuked, "We will have people with white hoods running through the countryside again." [19]

cushioncrawler
04-01-2010, 06:16 PM
April 1, 2010 "The subtle humor of this obviously metaphorical reference to a ship capsizing illustrated my concern about the impact of the planned military buildup on this small tropical island."

But hank's aktual words were......
"Did u see the look on the Ad's face -- sheeet -- hizgottabethinkun -- we aint got 180,000 life vests on dat island, and we aint got nuff life boats".
madMac.

cushioncrawler
04-01-2010, 06:26 PM
The Ad iz in trouble here, and iz backpedalling -- he sounds az if he iz hiding something -- he karnt answer hank's direkt questions -- this needs follow up.
madMac.
TRANSCRIPT: Admiral Robert F. Willard, USN, and the Honorable Henry C. "Hank" Johnson Jr., D-GA
C-SPAN via YouTube ^ | March 25, 2010 | Johnson & Willard

Posted on Friday, 2 April 2010 2:44:54 AM by Special Agent Anthony DiNozzo

THE HONORABLE HENRY C. "HANK" JOHNSON JR, D-GA: This is a, ah, island that, at its bridest [sic] level, is what? 12 miles from shore to shore? And at its smallest level, ah, ah, oh, smallest, ah, aaahhhhh, location it's, ah, 7 miles, ah, ah, between one shore and the other. Is zat correct?

ADMIRAL ROBERT WILLARD, USN: I don't have the exact, ah, dimensions, but, ah, to your point, sir, I think Guam is a small island.

JOHNSON JR, D-GA: Very small island, and about 24 miles, if I recall, long. So twenty, twenty-fo' miles long, about 7 miles wide at the least widest [sic], ah, place on the island, and about twinny, about twelf' miles wide, ah, ah, on the widest part of da island. And, ahm, I don' know how many square miles that that is - do you happen to know?

WILLARD, USN: I don't have that, ah, figure with me, sir; I can certainly supply it to you if you'd like.

JOHNSON JR, D-GA: Yeah. Mah, mah fee-yuh is dat, ah, da whole island will, ah, become so overly populated dat it will tip ovah', an', ah, an' capsize.

WILLARD, USN: Ah, we don't anticipate that; the ah, the ah, Guam population I think currently about 175,000, and again with 8,000 Marines and their families it's an addition of about 25,000, ah, more, ah, into the population.

JOHNSON JR, D-GA: And, ah, and also, ah, things like the, ah, environment, ah, the sessitive [sic] areas of, ah, the environment - coral reefs and those kinds of things - and I know dat, you know, lots of people don't like to think about that, but, you know, when you think about global warming either [sic], and, ahhmmmm, now we do have to think about it, and so, ah, I'm concerned from an environmental standpoint, whether or not Guam is the, da', da' best place to do dis relocation, but it's axually [sic] the only place, is that correct?

WILLARD, USN: Ah, this is the best place, this is the farthest west U.S. territory that we own, and, ah, you know, I, this is part of our nation. Ah, and in re-addressing the forward presence and posture importance, ah, to Pacific Command, ah, Guam is, ah, vital to this decision

cushioncrawler
04-01-2010, 06:31 PM
Ahhaaaa -- i hav it. The Ad haz never been on a boat. The Ad duzzen know what a capsize feelz like. The Ad gets seasick if he hazta spend a day on a small island. This needz follow up.
madMac.
Navy Career
Willard is a Los Angeles native. In 1969, he graduated from East Longmeadow High School, East Longmeadow, Mass. He is 1973 graduate of the United States Naval Academy. He possesses a master’s degree in engineering management from Old Dominion University and is an MIT Seminar XXI alumnus. As the Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet, he is responsible for the world’s largest fleet command, encompassing 100 million square miles and more than 170 ships and submarines, 1,300 aircraft, and 122,000 Sailors, Reservists and civilians.

An F-14 naval aviator, Willard served consecutively in Fighter Squadron 24 (VF-24), Fighter Squadron 124 (VF-124), and Fighter Squadron 2 (VF-2) at NAS Miramar, deploying aboard USS Constellation (CV-64), USS Ranger (CV-61), and USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). He then joined Navy Fighter Weapons School Top Gun as Operations Officer and Executive Officer, as well as aerial coordinator for the Paramount movie Top Gun.

In 1987, Willard reported to Fighter Squadron 51 (VF-51), where he served as Executive Officer and Commanding Officer of the Screaming Eagles, embarked in USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70). He subsequently attended Navy Nuclear Power Training before rejoining Carl Vinson as Executive Officer. Willard then commanded the flagships USS Tripoli (LPH-10) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) in various operations including Somalia, and the Persian Gulf.

As a flag officer, Willard has served on the Joint Staff as Deputy Director for Operations (Current Readiness and Capabilities); Commander, Carrier Group Five embarked in USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63); Deputy and Chief of Staff, Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Commander, Seventh Fleet, embarked in USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19) in Yokosuka, Japan; and Director for Force Structure, Resources and Assessment (DJ8) on the Joint Chiefs of Staff. From March 2005 to April 2007, Willard was the 34th Vice Chief of Naval Operations. After, he was the commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet from May 8, 2007 until September 25, 2009 when he was relieved by Admiral Patrick M. Walsh.

[edit] Movie Career
Willard appeared in and was a consultant for the movie Top Gun. He pilots the Mig-28 that receives "the bird" from Goose and Maverick. His callsign is "Rat," and his podcast is called the Rat-Pac Report.