PDA

View Full Version : Morri tips



Kato
08-20-2002, 08:58 AM
I'm sure this has been gone over at length but how does one keep a Morri tip in shape? You can't tip pik it, what do I to keep some roughness to hold chalk? I find myself not miscuing but not really having a nice layer of chalk when I check my tip after shots or even after chalking. I only use Master's Blue and I never use old chalk.

Kato

08-20-2002, 09:01 AM

Tom_In_Cincy
08-20-2002, 09:06 AM
Kato,
Morri tips are famous for getting shinny.. and not holding chalk well. Williard's nickel or dime shapers can be used with a very light touch.. just enough to get the shinny dome to hold chalk.


IMO, Talisman Tips hold their shape and chalk much better than the Morri's.

08-20-2002, 09:19 AM
Broken record time again, "Do nothing, just study "chalk application 101" on every shot and forget about the shiny part." Deno Andrews gave me a Moori tip on one of his visits and told me then, "Don't worry about tinkering with tip shaping or scuffing, a piece of glass will hold chalk if you apply it right." He also convinced me that all this shaping to a dime or a perfect nickel upon the shape getting beaten down is more a placebo than anything. Your stroke will dictate the tip's natural contour, I believe that he's 100% right on all accounts. My personal analysis is that miscues are a resultant of improper stroke mechanics, so the answer is to chalk well and fix the stroke not attack the tip..sid~~~life is simpler not worrying about tip care, haven't scratched a tip with nuthin' but chalk
in years

MikeM
08-20-2002, 09:31 AM
Kato,

I just roll the knourled part of my tip tool over them once a month or so. And that's just to make me feel better, because I never have a problem with them holding chalk or losing shape. Even if they appear shiny they will still hold chalk just fine.

MM

Tom_In_Cincy
08-20-2002, 09:32 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote:</font><hr>My personal analysis is that miscues are a resultant of improper stroke mechanics, so the answer is to chalk well and fix the stroke not attack the tip..sid~~~life is simpler not worrying about tip care, haven't scratched a tip with nuthin' but chalk
in years <hr></blockquote>

Sid,
If you observation is correct, then why do you need chalk?

Rich R.
08-20-2002, 09:47 AM
I have only recently had a Moori tip put on my cue, so I can not speak from experience with Moori's, but a good tool to use for any tip is a Brad Scuffer.
Without knowing what the tool is, it is hard to explain. It is a round disk with a concave shape, with the inside made rough. Put it in the palm of your hand and place it at a slight angle on your tip. Then kind of roll your cue to knurl the tip. This is very similar to the technique used by some people (maybe Barbara) with a ba$tard file. With a little practice, you will be able to put a rough, but even, surface on your tip which will hold chaulk well. It also does not wear tips down too quickly.
This tool is easily carried in your pocket for quick touch ups while playing. No need to dig in the cue case.
Rich R.

08-20-2002, 10:00 AM

Rich R.
08-20-2002, 10:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: whitewolf:</font><hr> Charlie in Baltimore who installed my Moori said to NEVER NEVER NEVER use those things. They are not necessary. Just a tip-pic is all you should use. You will wear out your valuable Moori tip unnecessarily. <hr></blockquote>
If not used properly, it will wear out any tip. You can't use it the way most people do, scraping away the tip. That is why the rolling method works best. It does not wear the tip much at all.
In the past, many on this board have stated that you should not use the tip pick with any layered tip. I am just following their instructions. This is my first experience with a layered tip.
Rich R.

Kato
08-20-2002, 10:27 AM
I have no chalk thingy.

Kato

Kato
08-20-2002, 10:29 AM
Sid, I'm not miscuing, just worried about he lack of chalk on the tip is all. Lucky for me, I'm sure my stroke is screwed up just the same/ccboard/images/icons/tongue.gif.

Kato

TalismanTony
08-20-2002, 01:36 PM
Hi Kato,

I think that the shine you mention is compacted chalk embedded in the layers of the tip. This is only on the surface but when its shiny its hard to get a fresh application of chalk to stay on and cover the tip properly. This sometimes happens with Talisman tips (not as often as with Moori tips i am told) and I just suggest to customers, a gentle scuffing using a willard dome shaper, or one of the domes on the ulitmate 5in1 tip tool. Since we are are talking very gently scuffing anyway any build up of chalk, it can be done with a peice of sand paper. All you are trying to do is dislodge the embedded chalk, not reshape the tip.

Personally, I am not very keen on the the tip pick, this was designed to be used on single layer tips. If used sparingly and carefully they can be ok but used wrongly they can shred a layered tip. Imagine a sheet of paper and then start putting pin prick size holes in it for a few minutes and you're left with a tea bag. Its the same with layered tips, I believe that unless you can re-insert the pins of the pick into the same holes each time, then you will eventually cause the top layer(s) to breakdown or for a fibre of leather to breakaway (usually the top layer) when this start happening you will end up with a volcano tip (with a hole where the lop layer was). On top of this, I see many people use a tip pick and then twist it, this spells disaster for layered tips of all brands.

While I do not completely agree with Sid's policy of doing nothing to the tip (leave the shaping to be dictated by your style of play) I do agree that tip maintainence should be only done when needed (not very often) and should not be part of habit/ritual after each game.

Except for the gentle scuffing, leave them alone, you'll be amazed at how much longer they last. When you consider the longer lifespan, it makes the extra few bucks (in the case of Talisman) for a layered tip seem a reasonable investment.

kind regards,

Rod
08-20-2002, 05:26 PM
Right on Rich, I use a tip tapper, god I hate those two words! Anyway I just use light pressure. Hold the cue at an angle, abt 60 degrees and with my left hand roll the cue and with my right hand guide the file. It takes about three light passes adjusting the angle of the file to have a great surface for chalk and very even. No need to do the center of the tip. It does not take off material. I might do this before a long day at play or tournament. One word of caution, if it is a real sharp file it will cut a tip so light pressure is important. The tip tapper is not sharp, did I say I hated that word? It reminds me of someone pounding on a piece of meat trying to tenderize. Don't beat your meat! lol If it ain't broke, don't try to fix it.

Doctor_D
08-20-2002, 05:34 PM
Good evening:

I currently use Morri Medium Hard Tips, and have previously used Morri Medium Tips, and have used tip shaping tools and tip picks on each with no adverse effects.

Dr. D.

Rich R.
08-21-2002, 04:35 AM
Rod, I have also used the tip tapper and it does a fine job. You have, what I consider, the correct technique and I agree with the light pressure. The only difference between the tapper and the Brad Scuffer is mostly personal preference. I do find the tapper to be a little more coarse in texture and it may wear the tip a little more. They both will do the job.
Rich R.

SpiderMan
08-21-2002, 08:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Rod:</font><hr> The tip tapper is not sharp, did I say I hated that word? It reminds me of someone pounding on a piece of meat trying to tenderize. Don't beat your meat! lol If it ain't broke, don't try to fix it. <hr></blockquote>

And don't pound your Porper, you could go blind /ccboard/images/icons/wink.gif

SpiderMan

10-04-2002, 11:49 PM
I am glad to see that you took my advice and eliminated one of the biggest variables...bravo.

Deno J. Andrews