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View Full Version : What Makes an A, B, C Player?



Coroner
04-03-2010, 12:21 PM
I would like to hear opinions on what makes an A, B, or C player. I see these categories in books or magazines and don't really know what it means. Is there a table or something that categorizes play into each of these groups? Do they correspond to APA skill levels? Thanks.

JoeW
04-04-2010, 04:22 AM
Lots of opinions here. One starting place is something like this.

C = APA 5+ (run a rack occasionally)
B = APA 7+ (run a few racks consistently)
A = Regional tournament winner in open competition (not APA).
Pro = National tournament winner or similar.

Bambu
04-04-2010, 07:42 AM
In a universal way, even the A-D ranks are not reliable. Perhaps more accurate than the APA, but still inconsistent from tournament to tournament. Stronger fields of players equate to lower ranks, and vice versa. Throw in different tournament directors opinions, and the results vary even more.

For instance, I have seen many APA 7's who are still ranked as C's in tougher competition. In weaker fields, the same people would be B's(possibly even A's). Asking how good a B player is, is sort of like asking how good an apa 7 is. Some C's are considered bangers that can't run a rack on their best day. Other C's I know, are legit run out players. There is too much variance to classify accurately.

dr_dave
04-05-2010, 03:24 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Coroner</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I would like to hear opinions on what makes an A, B, or C player. I see these categories in books or magazines and don't really know what it means. Is there a table or something that categorizes play into each of these groups? Do they correspond to APA skill levels? Thanks. </div></div>FYI, the A-D and other playing rating systems are described in detail here:

http://billiards.colostate.edu/threads/ratings.html

Regards,
Dave

Coroner
04-06-2010, 07:55 AM
Thank you guys for the info - all of it good. Looks like most of the ratings are based on 9-ball skill which makes sense considering most tournaments are 9-ball tournaments and the skill ratings can/are used to handicap. At least now I know what they are talking about and where I stand. Thanks again.