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LWW
04-05-2010, 05:32 PM
For the last year, 370 days actually, I have been rigorously monitoring my vitals as well as maintaining a diet, vitamin, and exercise program.

For some background, on day #1 my weight was 221.5 pounds. My body mass index was 30.46. My body fat was around 33%. My blood pressure was 148/75 and I was taking 1 BP med and another med to help counteract the known side effects of the BP med for a total of 2 BP related meds. My resting pulse rate was 72 beats per minute. My fasting blood sugar level was 185 ... I had tested 285 once prompting a redo, by all appearances the 285 was a false number. I have checked it daily since.

In addition to the 2 BP meds I was taking 2 allergy meds along with 2 acne meds.

At 52.5 years of age I was on 6 prescription meds. My doc told me my heart was strong as a horse, but due to age and a more sedentary lifestyle in semi retirement I was heading for trouble if something didn't change. I was about to go onto diabetic prescriptions, but after hearing many bad things of the side effects my willpower kicked in and I refused to go down to the reaper without a fight. It's just part of who I am.

Even though I was physically feeling strong and able to do things as well as many people younger than I, I had to face reality.

My goal was to get my bodyfat to 15% and my weight down 45 pounds to 176.5 and to get my blood sugar average down to 110 or onder.

Today I weighed in at 175.5 pounds, and that is tied for my low weight since I started this.

My BP was 97/58 and my YTD average BP is 103.77/60.52. My bodyfat is down to 16.5%. My resting heart rate was 57 this AM ... it has been as low as 49, and my YTD average is 57.34.

My blood sugar was 95 this AM and my YTD average is 106 even.

Today, I take 1 scrip for acne and may be quitting it soon. For allergies I am now using a OTC product only. BP issues are a thing of the past. I feel strong as an ox again and can perform as well as I could at 25 at everything I'm interested in doing.

I don't know if these results are above or below average for someone following a similar regimen, but if there is interest I would be glad to share it with folks.

The process I followed was put together by me after consultation with my doctor and reading the books of Dr Julian Whitaker, along with the advice in a book called "SUGAR BUSTERS" ... with some minor modifications to make it fit me and my past health/injury history.

If you are middle aged and beginning to lose your health, I'm certainly not trying to gloat ... but I am willing to share my experiences and help any who have interests in regaining/retaining their health.

LWW

cushioncrawler
04-05-2010, 06:42 PM
Dubb -- Good going. 15 stone 11 lbs down to 12 stone 7 lbs iz huge. Now u havta stay there -- a big job too.
I woz happy and proud of going from 13 st 6 lb down to 11 st 7 lb. It felt good getting down to my wt when age 20 yrs. I did it once before in 1975. I will google Dr Whitaker.
madMac.

cushioncrawler
04-05-2010, 06:54 PM
Looked up sugar busters.
I think they dont say nuff about how bad sugars are, especially fructose.
They seem to think fruits are ok -- i dont agree.
And they are fairly happ with lots of sugary stuff -- i dont agree.
And they say potatoes are bad -- i dont agree.
And they say that fat iz bad -- i dont entirely agree.
But if it works it works.

Their main devil iz white flour etc -- this iz probly my own first commandment.
madMac.

Sev
04-05-2010, 07:17 PM
Congrats to both of you.

If I might suggest adding Goji juice or berries to your diets. Their nutritional value and antioxidant value are par non.
It was recomended to me by an 83 year old woman. She had been taking it at the time for over 6 years and had never been sick.
I have found as long as I dont run out I never get sick.

This is company that I use.
http://www.genesistoday.com/index1.html

I am taking the Total Goji100, Resveratrol and Cacao100

unfortunately it does not reverse hair loss. Ah well.

LWW
04-05-2010, 10:20 PM
Fruits are one of the keys ... although whole fruits, not processed/canned fruits.

Also, not all fruits.

In carbs you have simple carbs ... such as fructose corn syrup and cane sugar ... which are deadly.

You also have more complex carbs ... those with high fiber content along with them ... which break down slower.

Oranges, grapefruits, grapes, cherries, are all good fruits. Bananas and pineapples not so good fruits.

LWW

Sev
04-07-2010, 05:32 PM
Read up on Goji, Acai, Mangosteen and Noni.

cushioncrawler
04-07-2010, 06:17 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Fruits are one of the keys ... although whole fruits, not processed/canned fruits. Also, not all fruits. In carbs you have simple carbs ... such as fructose corn syrup and cane sugar ... which are deadly. You also have more complex carbs ... those with high fiber content along with them ... which break down slower. Oranges, grapefruits, grapes, cherries, are all good fruits. Bananas and pineapples not so good fruits.LWW </div></div>I had another google. Grapes and cherrys are very bad -- hi total sugars and bad fructose/glucose ratios.
Bananas are okish on both points -- good, i luvs bananas.
Fructose iz even more toxik if one haz an intolerance -- ie, allmost everyone.
madMac.

LWW
04-08-2010, 02:54 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Looked up sugar busters.
I think they dont say nuff about how bad sugars are, especially fructose.
They seem to think fruits are ok -- i dont agree.
And they are fairly happ with lots of sugary stuff -- i dont agree.
And they say potatoes are bad -- i dont agree.
And they say that fat iz bad -- i dont entirely agree.
But if it works it works.

Their main devil iz white flour etc -- this iz probly my own first commandment.
madMac. </div></div>

You obviously have the book confused with something else.

1 - The name of the book is "SUHAR BUSTERS" and is about how bad refined sugars are, especially fructose.

2 - You may disagree with whole fruits, but you would be at odds with dietary science. The problem with refined sugars is that the refining process strips outall the fiber and nutrients. Without the plant fiber, the sugar is a straight dump into the blood system ... causing it to be forced into the cells as stored fat by a corresponding insulin dump. This ultimately leads to insulin resistance which is the root cause of diabetes and high blood pressure.

With the plant fiber intact, the carb dump doesn't happen and the sugar is metabolized over several hours instead.

3 - They are not happy with lots of sugary stuff. They are happy with a proper balance of slow metabolizing sugars.

4 - Potatoes are among the worst.

5 - I don't recall them saying fat is bad. I recall them saying excess fat is bad.

6 - It doesn't work because I wanted it to work. It works because it works.

LWW

cushioncrawler
04-08-2010, 05:42 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">4 - Potatoes are among the worst.</div></div>I luvs spuds. I hates dieticians. Spuds spent years in the bad'book -- then they puttem in the good'book -- then back in the bad'book.
I can eat spuds all day.
I wish they made spud beer.
Spud fritters for desert -- with a dollop of Iced'spud.
But u karnt beat fish'n'chips -- with lots and lots of salt.
madMac.

Qtec
04-08-2010, 06:06 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">For the last year, 370 days actually, I have been rigorously monitoring my vitals as well as maintaining a diet, vitamin, and exercise program. </div></div>

...............and its affecting your sanity. Give it up.

Q

LWW
04-09-2010, 06:49 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">For the last year, 370 days actually, I have been rigorously monitoring my vitals as well as maintaining a diet, vitamin, and exercise program. </div></div>

...............and its affecting your sanity. Give it up.

Q </div></div>

Proof again ... there is no topic possible on this forum that the far left will not troll.

LWW

LAMas
04-10-2010, 12:54 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">4 - Potatoes are among the worst.</div></div>I luvs spuds. I hates dieticians. Spuds spent years in the bad'book -- then they puttem in the good'book -- then back in the bad'book.
I can eat spuds all day.
I wish they made spud beer.
Spud fritters for desert -- with a dollop of Iced'spud.
But u karnt beat fish'n'chips -- with lots and lots of salt.
madMac. </div></div>

I also likes my spuds in Vodka.

LAMas
04-10-2010, 12:56 AM
Sugar Cane is OK but you have to chew and consume all of the fiber.

cushioncrawler
04-10-2010, 04:56 AM
Poland Traditional Polish Vodka



Bracka Staropolska vodka in gun-shaped bottle




Siwucha - Traditional Polish Vodka (Polska Wódka)


Text & Images - Copyright © 2008 Kevin Hulsey

The making of traditional home-brewed vodka, known colloquially as siwucha (pronounced she-voo-ha, and meaning "moonshine"), has been a cottage industry in Poland for several hundred years. Known originally as aqua vitae, or "water of life," distilled spirits made there way to Poland and Russia between the 12th and 17th centuries, and by the early 1900s there were thousands of distilleries in Krakow, Poznan, Silesia and Gdansk, as well as an unknown number home-distillers. Today, distilleries produce most of the vodka consumed in poland, but there is still a thriving market for boutique, hand-made vodkas produced by home-distillers.





The name "vodka" is a diminutive of the Polish word woda and the Russian word voda, both meaning "water." Its first use dates back to 1405, when it was used to describe medicinal potions listed in court documents from the Sandomierz Voivodeship region in western Poland. In the 1600s, the distillation of vodka was documented in Jerzy Potanski's Wódka lub gorzala. In Russia, the medicinal use of distilled grain spirits was also referred to as vodka khlebnogo vina, or "vodka of bread wine."



Clear Vodka vs Flavored Vodka
Traditionally, the Poles like to flavor their vodka with wild grasses, flowers, or various root vegetables which can be similar to the horseradish root (Armoracia rusticana). These flavored vodkas are called wódka wytrawna, or "seasoned vodkas," and they tend to represent the flavor and smell of the particular region from which they originate. Pure, unflavored vodka is called wódki czyste, or "clean vodkas" (aka clear vodkas).




Home-Brewed Polish Vodka in Krakow - It tastes much better than it looks!


Don't mistake the term "flavored vodka" for the vanilla, lemon, cherry or orange flavored vodkas that are so popular today. This type or flavored vodka is called wódki smakowe, or "taste vodkas," and their flavoring agents (flavourants) are mere afterthoughts which are added as marketing gimmicks. Traditional Polish flavored vodkas can be very subtle, as their flavorings simply reflect the natural environment where they were created.



Rye & Grain vs Potato Vodka
The general consensus is that the smoothest and purest tasting vodka is now distilled from either potatoes, spelt (Triticum spelta) or rye (Secale cereale), with those made from common wheat (Triticum aestivum), barley malt (Hordeum vulgare) and corn being of a slightly lower stature. This is not to say that good tasting vodka cannot be made from lesser grains or sugars, and the distilling process itself (fermentation, charcoal filtration, etc.) can also play an important role in the taste of the final product.




Selection of Polish Vodka (Rozne Rodze Polskiej Wodki)


Although vodka can also be distilled from grapes, molasses, soy, sugar beets, sugar cane and whey, the term "traditional vodka" would typically refer to spirits made with either potatoes or grains from the Triticeae subfamily of grasses. This distinction has even led to legal challenges within the European Union, as several EU countries fight over the proper use of the term"vodka."

Up until the fall of the Soviet Union and the political reforms that followed, all vodka in Poland was produced by a state-run monopoly called Polmos, an acronym for "Polski Monopol Spirytusowy," or "Polish Spirit Monopoly." In 1990, Polmos was divided into several independant companies, most of which were privatized, with a hand full remaining under state ownership.



10 of the Best Polish Vodkas
There may be no other place on earth that has as many varieties and brands of vodka to choose from. Although there are literally hundreds of brands of Polish vodka, only a fraction are available within the United States. In recent years, the Polish producers Belvedere and Chopin have given stalwarts such as Stolichnaya, Smirnoff, Finlandia, Absolut and Grey Goose a run for their money. So which Polish vodka is the best? Here is a short list of some of the most notable premium vodkas.



Best Premium 'Luxury' Polish Vodkas (Wódki Czyste)
1. Pan Tadeusz
Rye grain vodka. Ultra smooth, pure, and delicate with no aftertaste. Very affordable.
Producer/Distiller: V&S Luksusowa, Zielona Góra S.A.
Proof: 80
Pronunciation: pan ta-day-oosh (named after the poem by Adam Mickiewicz)
http://www.vsluksusowa.pl

2. Chopin
Potato vodka which is very smooth and pure. Easy to find, but can be pricey.
Producer/Distiller: Podlaska Wytwórnia Wódek Polmos in Siedlce
Proof: 80
Pronunciation: show-pan (named after the Polish composer Frédéric Chopin)
http://www.polmos-siedlce.com.pl

3. Luksusowa
Potato vodka from Baltic coast region. Luksusowa is Polish word for "luxury." Very smooth.
Producer/Distiller: V&S Luksusowa Zielona Gora S.A.
Proof: 80
Pronunciation: look-su-sova
http://www.luksusowa.net

4. Belvedere
Rye grain vodka. Very smooth for a grain vodka. Common, and less expensive than Chopin.
Producer/Distiller: Podlaska Wytwórnia Wódek Polmos in Siedlce
Proof: 80
http://www.polmos-siedlce.com.pl

5. Siwucha
Grain vodka. Hints of spice & oak. Siwucha is Slavic for 'moonshine' or 'home-brew.'
Producer/Distiller: Polmos
Proof: 80
Pronunciation: she-voo-ha
http://www.polmos.torun.pl



Best Flavored Polish Vodkas (Wódki Wytrawna)
1. Dziegielówka
Grain vodka flavored with herbs & flowers. Delicate flavor of lavender, angelica, & oregano flower.
Serving Suggestion: Ice cold or room temp, straight up
Proof: 76
Pronunciation: djeo-gloof-ka
http://www.nisskosher.pl

2. Debowa Polska Oak Tree Vodka
Grain vodka flavored with black elder flowers, and seasoned in natural oak wood.
Producer/Distiller: Stanley Stawski Distributing Co.
Serving Suggestion: Ice cold or room temp, straight up
Proof: 76
Pronunciation: dao-bo-va
http://www.debowa.pl

3. Imbirowa Wódka
Grain vodka flavored with floral herbs and ginger.
Producer/Distiller: Polmos Bialystok
Serving Suggestion: Ice cold or room temp, straight up
Proof: 80
Pronunciation: eem-beer-ofka
http://www.polmos.bialystok.pl

4. Klosówka Wódka
Grain (rye) vodka flavored with Lebiodka pospolita (Origanum vulgare) and zbozowego rye husk.
Producer/Distiller: Bartex Bartol Sp.J., Nowy Tomysl
Serving Suggestion: Ice cold, straight up
Proof: 80
Pronunciation:
http://www.polmos-siedlce.com.pl

5. Zubrówka
Grain (rye) vodka heavily flavored with herbs and Bison grass. Can be an acquired taste.
Producer/Distiller: Polmos Bialystok
Serving Suggestion: Straight up, or mixed with apple juice
Proof: 80
Pronunciation: zhuh-broov-kah
http://www.bisonbrandvodka.net



Polish 'Special Occasion' Vodkas
Krzeska Wódka
Rye vodka flavored with herbs from Podlasie region. Very strong, spicy flavor of gozdzik (clove).
Producer/Distiller: Podlaska Wytwórnia Wódek Polmos in Siedlce
Serving Suggestion: Serve during the holidays - a winter beverage.
Proof: 80
Pronunciation: ker-shes-ka
http://www.polmos-siedlce.com.pl

Old Krupnik
Krupnik Polish 'Honey Liqueur' is a traditional sweet vodka
Producer/Distiller: Destylarnia Sobieski S.A., Polmos Starogard Gdanski
Serving Suggestion: Serve cold or room temp during the holidays
Proof: 80
Pronunciation: kroop'-nik
http://www.wodki.gda.pl



Within poland, vodkas are judged each year by the Wielkopolska Chamber of Handicraft, and Debowa Polska Oak Tree Vodka has been constantly awarded the top Dobre bo Polskie, or "Good because Polish" award.



Serving Polish Vodka
Although the preferred serving temperature for the wester palate is strait from the freezer, in Poland, vodka is consumed at room temperature, or with a slight chill. Polish vodka averages around 40% alcohol, so it can be stored in the freezer without expansion.




Selection of Flavored Polish Vodkas and Flavored Liqueurs


No traditional Polish meal would be complete without a liberal helping of traditional Polish vodka. When sharing vodka with friends in Poland, the traditional Polish toast is "nostrovia," or "good health," "to your health."





In addition to clear spirits such as vodka, there is a myriad of flavored liqueurs of varying potency. There are Polish honey liqueurs such as Old Krupnik (38% alcohol), which is traditional sweet vodka that dates back to ancient times.



Sliwowica
For something really different, try a Polish liquor called Sliwowica, (pronounced 'shlee-vo-vee-tsah') which is made from plums and plum brandy, and can be as strong as 150 proof (70%) or more! Sliwowica is so strong it is considered to be medicinal by many Poles, supposedly curing a host of respiratory ailments and malities.



Alcoholism in Poland
The consumption of alcoholic beverages has been an integral part of Polish social tradition, and according to the U.S. Library of Congress' Federal Research Division, per capita consumption in Poland, Russia and other Slavik countries is well above the European average. This trend began during the communist era, and steadily increased through the 1980s. In 1980 the average male Pole over sixteen years of age consumed the equivalent of 16.6 liters of pure alcohol per year (see: countrystudies.us).

Although consumption remains higher that the EU average, it is on a downward trajectory. According to a 2004 report in Medycyna Ogólna (B. Skretowicz and J. Schabowski) the mean consumption of alcohol beverages per capita was about 7 litres of 100% alcohol during the period between 1998-2000, with adults between the ages of 40 to 49 consume the greatest amount. In an effort to combat alcoholism, the Polish government has banned the advertising of hard liquor, and the Polish Ministry of Health is now seeking to limit the advertising of beer as well.

The consumption of vodka is an important part of the Polish culture, and an integral part of the "Polish experience." In moderation, and absent the presence of a motor vehicle, it is an essential part of any traditional Polish meal, but remember to always drink responsibly, and never mix drinking and driving! See: madd.org

cushioncrawler
04-10-2010, 05:01 AM
I remember when very young -- vodka used to hit my tongue -- i kood stand up ok -- but my tongue just lay in the bottom of my mouth and refused to make any sense.

Dad used to make hiz own honey liquor -- krupnik?? -- him and hiz mates would sit around hiz still on a sunday -- the sweet juice dripping slowly from a coil into a small glass. I had a nip one day -- even tho i kood drink vodka ok -- this stuff burnt me all the way down.
We had 22 bee-hives on our block in the middle of town -- and we had a room full of honey that woz going off.
madMac.

LAMas
04-10-2010, 02:41 PM
So many forms of liquid spuds and so little time.
Thanks.