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LWW
04-07-2010, 03:07 AM
Meanwhile, as the parties true Uncle Tom's ... such as Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, and even dearest leader himself ... continue to treat the black voter as chattel, a new awakening is occurring across the nation as blacks, hispanics, and poor whites realize the destruction wrought upon them by the welfare state:

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><u>Black conservative tea party backers take heat</u>
Apr 6 06:07 PM US/Eastern
By VALERIE BAUMAN
Associated Press Writer

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - They've been called Oreos, traitors and Uncle Toms, and are used to having to defend their values. Now black conservatives are really taking heat for their involvement in the mostly white tea party movement—and for having the audacity to oppose the policies of the nation's first black president.
"I've been told I hate myself. I've been called an Uncle Tom. I've been told I'm a spook at the door," said Timothy F. Johnson, chairman of the Frederick Douglass Foundation, a group of black conservatives who support free market principles and limited government.


"Black Republicans find themselves always having to prove who they are. Because the assumption is the Republican Party is for whites and the Democratic Party is for blacks," he said.

Johnson and other black conservatives say they were drawn to the tea party movement because of what they consider its commonsense fiscal values of controlled spending, less taxes and smaller government. The fact that they're black—or that most tea partyers are white—should have nothing to do with it, they say.

"You have to be honest and true to yourself. What am I supposed to do, vote Democratic just to be popular? Just to fit in?" asked Clifton Bazar, a 45-year-old New Jersey freelance photographer and conservative blogger.

Opponents have branded the tea party as a group of racists hiding behind economic concerns—and reports that some tea partyers were lobbing racist slurs at black congressmen during last month's heated health care vote give them ammunition.

But these black conservatives don't consider racism representative of the movement as a whole—or race a reason to support it.

Angela McGlowan, a black congressional candidate from Mississippi, said her tea party involvement is "not about a black or white issue."

"It's not even about Republican or Democrat, from my standpoint," she told The Associated Press. "All of us are taxed too much."

Still, she's in the minority. As a nascent grassroots movement with no registration or formal structure, there are no racial demographics available for the tea party movement; it's believed to include only a small number of blacks and Hispanics.

Some black conservatives credit President Barack Obama's election—and their distaste for his policies—with inspiring them and motivating dozens of black Republicans to plan political runs in November.

For black candidates like McGlowan, tea party events are a way to reach out to voters of all races with her conservative message.

"I'm so proud to be a part of this movement! I want to tell you that a lot of people underestimate you guys," the former national political commentator for Fox News told the cheering crowd at a tea party rally in Nashville, Tenn., in February.

Tea party voters represent a new model for these black conservatives—away from the black, liberal Democratic base located primarily in cities, and toward a black and white conservative base that extends into the suburbs.

Black voters have overwhelmingly backed Democratic candidates, support that has only grown in recent years. In 2004, presidential candidate Sen. John Kerry won 88 percent of the black vote; four years later, 95 percent of black voters cast ballots for Obama.

Black conservatives don't want to have to apologize for their divergent views.

"I've gotten the statement, 'How can you not support the brother?'" said David Webb, an organizer of New York City's Tea Party 365, Inc. movement and a conservative radio personality.

Since Obama's election, Webb said some black conservatives have even resorted to hiding their political views.

"I know of people who would play the (liberal) role publicly, but have their private opinions," he said. "They don't agree with the policy but they have to work, live and exist in the community ... Why can't we speak openly and honestly if we disagree?"

Among the 37 black Republicans running for U.S. House and Senate seats in November is Charles Lollar of Maryland's 5th District.

A tea party supporter running against House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., Lollar says he's finding support in unexpected places.

The 38-year-old U.S. Marine Corps reservist recently walked into a bar in southern Maryland decorated with a Confederate flag. It gave his wife Rosha pause.

"I said, 'You know what, honey? Many, many of our Southern citizens came together under that flag for the purpose of keeping their family and their state together,'" Lollar recalled. "The flag is not what you're to fear. It's the stupidity behind the flag that is a problem. I don't think we'll find that in here. Let's go ahead in."

Once inside, they were treated to a pig roast, a motorcycle rally—and presented with $5,000 in contributions for his campaign.

McGlowan, one of three GOP candidates in north Mississippi's 1st District primary, seeks a seat held since 2008 by Democrat Travis Childers. The National Republican Congressional Committee has supported Alan Nunnelee, chairman of the state Senate Appropriations Committee, who is also pursuing tea party voters.

McGlowan believes the tea party movement has been unfairly portrayed as monolithically white, male and middle-aged, though she acknowledged blacks and Hispanics are a minority at most events.

Racist protest signs at some tea party rallies and recent reports by U.S. Reps. John Lewis, D-Ga., and Barney Frank, D-Mass., that tea partyers shouted racial and anti-gay slurs at them have raised allegations of racism in the tea party movement.

Black members of the movement say it is not inherently racist, and some question the reported slurs. "You would think—something that offensive—you would think someone got video of it," Bazar, the conservative blogger, said.

"Just because you have one nut case, it doesn't automatically equate that you've got an organization that espouses (racism) as a sane belief," Johnson said.

Hilary Shelton, director of the Washington bureau of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, suggested a bit of caution.

"I'm sure the reason that (black conservatives) are involved is that from an ideological perspective, they agree," said Shelton. "But when those kinds of things happen, it is very important to be careful of the company that you keep." </div></div>

&gt;&gt;&gt;OH DEAR&lt;&lt;&lt; (http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D9ETR1380&show_article=1)

LWW

cushioncrawler
04-07-2010, 04:44 PM
Dubb -- When u beleev the destruktion, u will see it.
Or----- U wont see the destruktion untill u beleev it.
But i woz thinking.
How duz one recognize destruktion wrought upon them by the welfare state ??????????
Duz it look or feel or smell different to other types of destruktion.
What shood the poor-blacks and poor-hispaniks and poor-whites be looking for ???????????
madMac.

Sev
04-07-2010, 04:56 PM
The same thing Gettocrawlers in Australia are looking for.
Escape from their current conditions. That is if they are inspired to want to escape in the first place.

LWW
04-07-2010, 06:04 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">What shood the poor-blacks and poor-hispaniks and poor-whites be looking for ???????????
madMac.</div></div>

An end to the welfare state ... an end to the demokooks acting as if the black vote was "OWNED" by them ... an end to government policies which promote fatherless households ... an end to a justice system which excuses and coddles young criminals and thereby aids and abets them becoming serious and lifetime criminals ... an end to an educational system that teaches children from ag3 5 that they are inferior citizens who can't possibly fend on their own unless the gubmint man intercedes.

That would be a nice start.

LWWW

cushioncrawler
04-07-2010, 06:28 PM
"Eve of Destruction" is a protest song written by P. F. Sloan in 1965. Several artists have recorded it, but the best-known recording was by Barry McGuire. This recording was made between July 12 and July 15, 1965 and released by Dunhill Records. The accompanying musicians were top-tier LA session men: P.F. Sloan on guitar, Hal Blaine (of Phil Spector's "Wrecking Crew") on drums, and Larry Knechtel on bass. The vocal track was thrown on as a rough mix and was not intended to be the final version, but a copy of the recording "leaked" out to a DJ, who began playing it.[1] The song was an instant hit and as a result the more polished vocal track that was at first envisioned was never recorded.

Contents [hide]
1 Background
2 Lyrical references
3 Other
4 References
5 External links

[edit] Background
In the first week of its release, the single was at number 103 on the Billboard charts. By August 12, Dunhill released the LP, "Nick Featuring Eve of Destruction". The LP reached its peak of number thirty-seven on the Billboard album chart during the week ending September 25. That same day the single went to number one on the chart, and repeated the feat on the Cashbox chart, where it had debuted at number thirty. McGuire was never again to break into the top forty of the Billboard Hot 100.

The song had initially been presented to The Byrds as a Dylanesque potential single, but they rejected it. The Turtles, another LA group who often recorded The Byrds' discarded or rejected material, recorded a version instead. Their version was issued as an album track shortly before McGuire's version was cut. It eventually hit number 100 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1970.

The song is a grave warning of imminent apocalypse, and considered by some to be the epitome of a protest song. It expressed the frustrations and fears of young people in the age of the Cold War, Vietnam, the nuclear arms race, and the civil rights movement.

The American media helped popularize the song by using it as an example of everything that was wrong with the youth of that time.[2] The song also drew flak from conservatives. A group called The Spokesmen released an answer record entitled "The Dawn of Correction". A few months later, Green Beret medic Sgt. Barry Sadler released the patriotic "Ballad of the Green Berets". Johnny Sea's spoken word recording, "Day For Decision", was also a response to the song. The Temptations' song "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)" mentions the song title.

In the late 1970s, Los Angeles punk band The Dickies recorded a cover of "Eve of Destruction". New Wave group Red Rockers covered the song in their 1984 album Schizoprenic Circus. Johnny Thunders recorded it in the "Hurt Me" album and also frequently covered the song in concert, while veteran Canadian punk outfit D.O.A. also covered the song on their 2004 album Live Free Or Die. The song has also been covered by Australian band Screaming Jets on their 1997 album World Gone Crazy. Left-wing Christian punk band Crashdog also covered it on their album Cashists, Fascists, and Other Fungus. Post-Industrial psychedelic rock outfit Psychic TV released "Eve Ov Destruction" as a limited edition single in the late 1980s. In 2003, the reggae singer Luciano recorded a version of the song. The band Bishop Allen also released a song titled "Eve of Destruction" on their 2003 album, "Charm School" which takes it's chorus from this song.

The song was briefly featured on Stephen King's 1994 miniseries The Stand. With a burning Des Moines, Iowa as a backdrop, Larry Underwood sits atop the hood of a car, belting out the song to amuse himself until interrupted by another survivor of the superflu. It also appeared in The Simpsons episode GABF16, "The Girl Who Slept Too Little," and was also featured in Michael Winterbottom's 1997 film Welcome to Sarajevo. A Joey Scarbury cover was played repeatedly in the original airing of The Greatest American Hero episode "Operation Spoil Sport" to encourage the hero to prevent an automated nuclear strike being triggered by a renegade U.S. general (the aliens who provided the hero's super-powers commandeered his car radio and tuned it to stations playing the song). Due to rights issues, the song does not appear in the DVD version of the episode. A French translation is used in the closing credits of Michael Moore's film Sicko. An Italian version, "Questo vecchio pazzo mondo" ("This old crazy world"), was recorded by Gino Santercole in 1967; a 1984 recording by Adriano Celentano was included in his album I miei americani (a collection of US hits translated into Italian).This song also makes an appearance in "The Doors"(directed by Oliver Stone), as the opening act performs it before the Doors take the stage in Miami.

Though he's now known primarily as a singer of contemporary Christian songs, Barry McGuire has continued to sing "Eve Of Destruction" in recent years, often updating the lyrics to refer to such events as the Columbine High School massacre.

The song was banned by some radio stations in the USA[3] as well as by the BBC[4] and Radio Scotland[5].

The song, like many other popular songs of the day, gave its name to a gun truck used by United States Army Transportation Corps forces during the Vietnam war. The truck is on display at the U.S. Army Transportation Museum and is believed to be the only surviving example of a Vietnam era gun truck.[6]

The song is featured in the fourth level of the Vietnam War Video game Men of Valor. While the song is playing, the main character's lieutenant is dying of his wound on the battlefield.

Barry McGuire became a born-again Christian, and as a result renounced the song for many years, refusing to perform it.

Barry McGuire updated the lyrics when he performed at a reunion of folksingers, with the line "Selma, Alabama", replaced by the words "Columbine Colorado", referring to the student massacre of 1999.

On March 12, 2008, Barry McGuire appeared on the Australian Music Comedy/Game Show Spicks and Specks, performing an updated version of "Eve of Destruction", with new lines such as "You're old enough to kill/ you just started voting" and "...can live for ten years in space". The reference to "Red China" was also removed.

McGuire also mentioned that "Eve of Destruction" was recorded in one take on a Thursday morning (from words scrawled on a crumpled piece of paper), and he got a call from the record company at 7:00 the following Monday morning, telling him to turn on the radio - his song was playing. The recording includes an "ahhh" where McGuire couldn't read the words.

[edit] Lyrical references
"You’re old enough to kill, but not for votin’" refers to the fact that in the United States, men were subject to the draft at age 18, while at that time the minimum voting age (in all but four states) was 21.
"And even the Jordan River has bodies floatin’" refers to The War over Water.
The song also makes reference to Selma, Alabama where Bloody Sunday took place.
"Ah, you may leave here, for four days in space, but when you return, it's the same old place." This refers to the June 1965 mission of Gemini 4, which lasted just over four days.
According to Sloan, the lyric "The pounding of the drums the pride and disgrace" relates to the Kennedy assassination.[2]

cushioncrawler
04-07-2010, 06:30 PM
The eastern world, it is exploding
Violence flarin', bullets loadin'
You're old enough to kill, but not for votin'
You don't believe in war, but what's that gun you're totin'
And even the Jordan River has bodies floatin'

But you tell me
Over and over and over again, my friend
Ah, you don't believe
We're on the eve
of destruction.

Don't you understand what I'm tryin' to say
Can't you feel the fears I'm feelin' today?
If the button is pushed, there's no runnin' away
There'll be no one to save, with the world in a grave
[Take a look around ya boy, it's bound to scare ya boy]

And you tell me
Over and over and over again, my friend
Ah, you don't believe
We're on the eve
of destruction.

Yeah, my blood's so mad feels like coagulatin'
I'm sitting here just contemplatin'
I can't twist the truth, it knows no regulation.
Handful of senators don't pass legislation
And marches alone can't bring integration
When human respect is disintegratin'
This whole crazy world is just too frustratin'

And you tell me
Over and over and over again, my friend
Ah, you don't believe
We're on the eve
of destruction.

Think of all the hate there is in Red China
Then take a look around to Selma, Alabama
You may leave here for 4 days in space
But when you return, it's the same old place
The poundin' of the drums, the pride and disgrace
You can bury your dead, but don't leave a trace
Hate your next-door neighbor, but don't forget to say grace
And… tell me over and over and over and over again, my friend
You don't believe
We're on the eve
Of destruction
Mm, no no, you don't believe
We're on the eve
of destruction.

cushioncrawler
04-07-2010, 06:41 PM
Psa 35:7 For without cause have they hid for me their net [in] a pit, [which] without cause they have digged for my soul.


Psa 35:8 Let destruction come upon him at unawares; and let his net that he hath hid catch himself: into that very destruction let him fall.

cushioncrawler
04-07-2010, 06:43 PM
Job 5:21 Thou shalt be hid from the scourge of the tongue: neither shalt thou be afraid of destruction when it cometh.
Job 5:22 At destruction and famine thou shalt laugh: neither shalt thou be afraid of the beasts of the earth.

Sev
04-07-2010, 06:43 PM
It's a great tune.

cushioncrawler
04-07-2010, 06:50 PM
2Pe 2:1 ¶ But there were false prophets also among the people, even as there shall be false teachers among you, who privily shall bring in damnable heresies, even denying the Lord that bought them, and bring upon themselves swift destruction.


2Pe 2:2 And many shall follow their pernicious ways; by reason of whom the way of truth shall be evil spoken of.


2Pe 2:3 And through covetousness shall they with feigned words make merchandise of you: whose judgment now of a long time lingereth not, and their damnation slumbereth not

Sev
04-07-2010, 06:54 PM
Death is the only guaranty life gives you.

Under
04-09-2010, 12:28 PM
http://img.breitbart.com/images/2010/4/6/ap-p/299ff08c-3dd7-4276-87b4-5208a8bc44a4_preview.jpg
In this Feb. 10, 2010 photo, Fox News political analyst Angela McGlowan...

http://img.breitbart.com/images/2010/4/6/ap-p/de3466cf-c457-4623-856b-e521cc4c70f3_preview.jpg
In this March 28, 2010 photo, David Webb, an organizer of New York City's...

http://img.breitbart.com/images/2010/4/6/ap-p/43041577-51e7-4996-9df5-e202e0590ba6_preview.jpg
In this March 28, 2010 photo, David Webb, an organizer of New York City's...

"I'm sure the reason that (black conservatives) are involved is that from an ideological perspective, they agree," said Shelton. "But when those kinds of things happen, it is very important to be careful of the company that you keep."

Associated Press writers Brian Witte in Maryland and Emily Wagster Pettus in Mississippi contributed to this report.

Under
04-09-2010, 12:40 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">2Pe 2:1 ¶ But there were false prophets also among the people, even as there shall be false teachers among you, who privily shall bring in damnable heresies, even denying the Lord that bought them, and bring upon themselves swift destruction.

2Pe 2:2 And many shall follow their pernicious ways; by reason of whom the way of truth shall be evil spoken of.

2Pe 2:3 And through covetousness shall they with feigned words make merchandise of you: whose judgment now of a long time lingereth not, and their damnation slumbereth not
</div></div>
Black Conservatives Called ‘Uncle Toms’

A dog bites man story from a nevertheless seemingly surprised Associated Press:
David Webb, an organizer of New York City’s Tea Party 365, Inc.
Black conservative tea party backers take heat

By VALERIE BAUMAN (AP) April 6, 2010

ALBANY, N.Y. — They’ve been called Oreos , traitors and Uncle Toms, and are used to having to defend their values. <span style='font-size: 17pt'> Now black conservatives are really taking heat for their involvement in the mostly white tea party movement — and for having the audacity to oppose the policies of the nation’s first black president.</span>
http://photos.smugmug.com/photos/830540730_w8TBM-O.jpg
David Webb, an organizer of New York City’s Tea Party 365, Inc.

Never mind that according to all the recent polls the Tea Party is not "mostly white." It merely represents the demographics of the country as a whole.

By the way, notice how throughout the article the Associated Press refuses to capitalize “tea party” or “tea partyers.” Isn’t that ‘disrespect’?

In fact, “tea” should be entirely capitalized, being an acronym for “Taxed Enough Already.” A detail that our media watchdogs seldom if ever mention.

"I’ve been told I hate myself. I’ve been called an Uncle Tom. I’ve been told I’m a spook at the door," said Timothy F. Johnson, chairman of the Frederick Douglass Foundation, a group of black conservatives who support free market principles and limited government.

You can be damn sure that conservative blacks are regularly called far worse. Including the dreaded ‘N-word.’

"Black Republicans find themselves always having to prove who they are. Because the assumption is the Republican Party is for whites and the Democratic Party is for blacks," he said.

Johnson and other black conservatives say they were drawn to the tea party movement because of what they consider its commonsense fiscal values of controlled spending, less taxes and smaller government. The fact that they’re black — or that most tea partyers are white — should have nothing to do with it, they say…

The last time we checked, most Democrats are also white.

Opponents have branded the tea party as a group of racists hiding behind economic concerns — and reports that some tea partyers were lobbing racist slurs at black congressmen during last month’s heated health care vote give them ammunition…

So reports, allegations, are all it takes to get one ammunition nowadays.

<span style='font-size: 17pt'> But these black conservatives don’t consider racism representative of the movement as a whole — or race a reason to support it.</span> Racist protest signs at some tea party rallies and recent reports by U.S. Reps. John Lewis, D-Ga., and Barney Frank, D-Mass., that tea partyers shouted racial and anti-gay slurs at them have raised allegations of racism in the tea party movement.

In other words, according to the AP, unsubstantiated allegations of racist protest signs and racial and anti-gay slurs have raised allegations of racism.

Black members of the movement say it is not inherently racist, and some question the reported slurs.

"Not inherently."

"You would think — something that offensive — you would think someone got video of it," [Clifton] Bazar, [a] conservative blogger, said…

As we have said all along, if even one of these alleged actions have actually occurred we would be seeing the videotape played in an endless loop on every TV channel, just like the Rodney King beating of yesteryear.

But, alas, you can’t videotape something that didn’t happen.

Hilary Shelton, director of the Washington bureau of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, suggested a bit of caution.

"I’m sure the reason that (black conservatives) are involved is that from an ideological perspective, they agree," said Shelton. "But when those kinds of things happen, it is very important to be careful of the company that you keep."