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02-27-2002, 09:22 AM
In one of Byrne's books he describes a shot and credits you to figuring out the math in where to aim. It's when you have the CB frozen to the object ball and you want to drive the CB through the object ball to contact and possibly make another ball, perhaps the 9 ball. Now wouldn't this be an illegal shot for double kissing the cue ball?

Mike O

Fred Agnir
02-27-2002, 09:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Mike O:</font><hr> In one of Byrne's books he describes a shot and credits you to figuring out the math in where to aim. It's when you have the CB frozen to the object ball and you want to drive the CB through the object ball to contact and possibly make another ball, perhaps the 9 ball. Now wouldn't this be an illegal shot for double kissing the cue ball?<hr></blockquote>

I'm not Bob, but...

The BCA rulebook clearly states that you *can* shoot directly at the cueball with a normal stroke if the balls are frozen. Only one hit is the result. If the balls are close but not frozen, then a double-hit is likely to occur. The double-hit is manifest by the chirping sound (like crickets.

BTW, I can never seem to make the JIS (Jewett Interference System) shot.

Fred

02-27-2002, 11:53 AM
What Fred said. It is often useful to get a rule book, and see what the rules really are.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr>
BTW, I can never seem to make the JIS (Jewett Interference System) shot.

Fred<hr></blockquote>
The two common problems are having the cue ball not frozen and not allowing for the effects of throw. Also, if you use draw or follow, the cue ball will curve, perhaps unexpectedly.

Here is a trick shot: put the cue ball on the head spot and freeze an object ball to it, also on the headstring (the balls are pointed straight across the table). Freeze an object ball to the long cushion two diamonds from the foot pocket, and on the long rail that the frozen object ball will hit first. Aim the cue ball at the edge of the pocket liner that you can see in the side pocket, and the object ball on the rail will be cut down the rail to the foot pocket.
Adjust your aim by picking a different point in the side pocket. Be sure that the cue ball is frozen to the object ball and that they are pointed straight across the table.

Without correction for throw, the JIS is only good enough to make very easy shots, such as balls sitting in the pocket. With correction, shots like the above trick shot are possible.

Bob Jewett