PDA

View Full Version : Any advice for a beginner?



Baxter
05-27-2010, 11:06 PM
I'm relatively new to competitive/serious pool. I have a natural talent for the game, everyone I play (or should I say beat ;)) have a problem believing I've only been playing seriously for about 2 years. I recently got myself my first decent stick. It's a lower end Players cue with an 11mm shaft, and I'm about to put a Moori med tip on it. I like it because it has a low deflection, responsive english, and the smaller size feels better in my smaller hands. I've been looking at some performance shafts for it, mainly the Predator Z2/3142 and Meucci red/black dots. I also picked up Robert Byrne's New Standard Book Of Pool And Billiards. That book has helped my game transform, especially in the areas of cueball control and defensive strategies. I'm looking for some advice from more experienced players, stick wise or anything else you may think a beginner should know. I'm trying to absorb as much information as possible, constantly striving to improve my game in any way possible. Any information or ideas you can contribute are much appreciated!

1Time
05-28-2010, 01:44 AM
Try different cues / shafts / tips / equipment, and use what works best for you. I couldn't recommend any specific changes until I saw you shoot or learned of any deficiencies or problems you are having. The cue ball used matters. For example, shooting on a bar table with a heavy cue ball won't be the same as shooting on a 9' table with a red circle Aramith cue ball.

Seek out instruction from better players / instructors. Some of the most valuable things I've learned that improved my play was from better players (including a world champ). While most better players usually aren't willing or able to instruct so it actually helps, you never know when asking will pay off. I am available for non-professional instruction if you're in Las Vegas - no charge.

Watch better players shoot in person, on the internet / TV, especially money games (in person) and pro tourney play (past and live).

pooltchr
05-28-2010, 07:05 AM
The kind of equipment (cue, shaft, tip, etc) isn't nearly as important as knowing what to do with it. You can pick up some good information from books and videos, but nothing will help your game more than spending time with a professional instructor...someone who can observe everything you do, help you spot those little problems that may be holding you back, and help you develop a good plan to get your game to whatever level you want.

It sounds like you are anxious to learn, which makes you a prime candidate for quality instruction. For the cost of a mid level cue, you can get something that will help your game for the rest of your life. I can speak from personal experience that it was the best investment I ever made in my nearly 50 years of playing this game.

Steve

Baxter
05-28-2010, 04:58 PM
I played my first season in a bar league this year, and we use the Red Dot Aramith ball. Once I found out that is what we were using, I immediately went out and bought my own. Any kind of pool that comes on TV is automatically set to record on my DVR, and I watch it religiously. As far as professional instruction goes, there's nobody within my general area that's qualified. To take lessons, I'd have to travel down to Sacramento, about a 2 hour drive. I plan on looking into that as soon as the finances are there though. As far as observing better players, I'm like a sponge. I'm good at retaining information, and I'm not afraid to ask questions. However, I learned from my high school/college golf career that accepting advice from multiple (and often conflicting) sources can be a huge source of confusion and can actually hurt your game more than it helps. I accept all instruction/advice I get from everybody, but I'm very careful to take it all with a grain of salt, and take information that applies to my own game while disregarding the rest. I think that coming from the upper echelon of the golf world has helped me tremendously in the transition into the pool world, and puts me at a tremendous advantage over somebody of the same level that didn't have that wonderful opportunity, especially in the mental side of the game. I'm very good at keeping my emotions in check, staying focused, visualizing the shot at hand, and planning my strategy. That comes from my competitive golf experience. I think I'm also pretty good at evaluating my opponents strengths and weaknesses and playing them accordingly (which is why I think I'm consistently beating people with 10+ more years of experience than me). Also, my favorite Pro to watch is Jasmin Ouschan. I see a lot of similarities in the way she plays pool and the way I play pool, even with a huge gap in skill. I think I'm pretty close to rambling right now, but the last thing I want to say is being a Professional Pool Player is my goal. It's a lofty goal to aim for, but I feel like I'm on the right path and that the natural talent is there. I have intermediate goals set, first one being winning the Top Shooter tournament in league, and Rookie Of The Year (I'd be the first ever in this league to do so, and I'm gunning for it). I'm still young (22), and I'm not in a big hurry. Life isn't a race, and I have nothing but time.

pooltchr
05-28-2010, 05:31 PM
Get in touch with RandyG or Scott Lee, both of whom are regular posters on here. I'm pretty sure Randy does a school in California every year, and Scott travels the country giving lessons. Either of them would be great choices to get your game on track.

Steve

Baxter
05-28-2010, 06:23 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Get in touch with RandyG or Scott Lee, both of whom are regular posters on here. I'm pretty sure Randy does a school in California every year, and Scott travels the country giving lessons. Either of them would be great choices to get your game on track.

Steve </div></div>

Thanks for the advice. Looked at both of their websites, and their prices are way too steep for my present situation. Hopefully I'll get a raise soon, and will be able to consider it more openly. Until then, DIY. My golf game was completely self-taught, and good enough to get me into the number 1 spot on a respected Jr. College team. I'll just have to settle for the same blue-collar self-taught ethics in my pool game for now.

Baxter
05-28-2010, 06:40 PM
Also, one more question I forgot to include in the OP. Any advice on the gambling aspect of pool? Ways to identify a hustler, smart bets, etc. I'm not really looking to fleece anybody, but I do like to play for small wagers. I have a couple guys interested in backing me, but I'm not all that comfortable playing for any kind of substantial money quite yet. If you do or have played for bigger sums of money, how did you get to that point and how did you know you were ready for that?

Baxter
05-28-2010, 06:41 PM
And again, all advice and tips are very much appreciated. Thank you all.

KellyStick
05-28-2010, 07:24 PM
Where do you live? If it's close we might collaborate. I'm in Baton Rouge.

pooltchr
05-28-2010, 08:34 PM
His location on his posts says CA

Steve

wolfdancer
05-29-2010, 12:02 AM
Sacramento used to be the place for great pool action....I used to travel there to the Great American, and to The Jointed Cue in Roseville. Reno still holds tournaments twice a year. ( I believe) Try some of the weekly cheap events in your area
Try checking out the USPPA website....they have handicapped 9 ball tournaments...
I'm no expert on pool....but try to evaluate your game by how well you are playing, not how well the other guy is. Your inning count, your balls per inning count, your kicking, banking, safety play, ability to control the CB....
Don't just tune out the other guy though, your opponent....you can even learn from his mistakes....or try to compare how you would play his table layout....and see if his way is better.
There is an old saying in golf....if you ain't shooting in the 70's by the end of the first year....you ain't never going to shoot regularly in the 70's.
George Knudsen?...said there are three kinds of pool players A, B, C,.....C players are new to the game, practice, instruction, playing time, and they can become B players....but unless you were born with natural talent...one can never become an A player.
The old joke goes "How do you get to Carnegie Hall?...and the answer is "practice, practice".....but that alone won't get you to the pro level in pool.
You can find some free matches, even free instruction on you tube, esp Fargo Billiards, on that site...or OBTN.TV (on the break news)
Everybody that's a ball better then the other guy wants to give instruction to help out....but it hurts more then helps one's developement....usually.
If you can afford a lesson or two down the road....the SPFF guys can help......sometimes we are practicing our mistakes.....adding something unnecassary, even detrimental to our stroke...a good instuctor can help. I got so many extra moves in my golf swing, it's a wonder I can hit the ball....
Dr. Dave here has some good ideas on the game.
I never needed any instruction as I was a natural talent, a life long C player.....In golf it only took me 10 years to begin scoring, sporadically ...in the 70's.
A little trivia...Richard Helmstedder got paired up with Eli Callaway on the CG...Eli was having trouble with the wood splitting on his first designs...and Richard had a line of cues and was also an engineer...end result he is the design engineer behind Callaway.....
Good luck with your game....and watch out for the hustlers....that guy that can't make a ball when you are playing for free, but can suddenly draw the ball 2 table lengths for perfect position when there is some cash on the wire....that ain't just luck.
My advice though....give up pool...get out while there is still time, still hope.....the game is just too GD addictive, and should be outlawed ..They had it right in "The Music Man"

Baxter
05-29-2010, 03:07 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Sacramento used to be the place for great pool action....I used to travel there to the Great American, and to The Jointed Cue in Roseville. Reno still holds tournaments twice a year. ( I believe) Try some of the weekly cheap events in your area
Try checking out the USPPA website....they have handicapped 9 ball tournaments...
I'm no expert on pool....but try to evaluate your game by how well you are playing, not how well the other guy is. Your inning count, your balls per inning count, your kicking, banking, safety play, ability to control the CB....
Don't just tune out the other guy though, your opponent....you can even learn from his mistakes....or try to compare how you would play his table layout....and see if his way is better.
There is an old saying in golf....if you ain't shooting in the 70's by the end of the first year....you ain't never going to shoot regularly in the 70's.
George Knudsen?...said there are three kinds of pool players A, B, C,.....C players are new to the game, practice, instruction, playing time, and they can become B players....but unless you were born with natural talent...one can never become an A player.
The old joke goes "How do you get to Carnegie Hall?...and the answer is "practice, practice".....but that alone won't get you to the pro level in pool.
You can find some free matches, even free instruction on you tube, esp Fargo Billiards, on that site...or OBTN.TV (on the break news)
Everybody that's a ball better then the other guy wants to give instruction to help out....but it hurts more then helps one's developement....usually.
If you can afford a lesson or two down the road....the SPFF guys can help......sometimes we are practicing our mistakes.....adding something unnecassary, even detrimental to our stroke...a good instuctor can help. I got so many extra moves in my golf swing, it's a wonder I can hit the ball....
Dr. Dave here has some good ideas on the game.
I never needed any instruction as I was a natural talent, a life long C player.....In golf it only took me 10 years to begin scoring, sporadically ...in the 70's.
A little trivia...Richard Helmstedder got paired up with Eli Callaway on the CG...Eli was having trouble with the wood splitting on his first designs...and Richard had a line of cues and was also an engineer...end result he is the design engineer behind Callaway.....
Good luck with your game....and watch out for the hustlers....that guy that can't make a ball when you are playing for free, but can suddenly draw the ball 2 table lengths for perfect position when there is some cash on the wire....that ain't just luck.
My advice though....give up pool...get out while there is still time, still hope.....the game is just too GD addictive, and should be outlawed ..They had it right in "The Music Man" </div></div>

Thank you for the advice, I will take it to heart, and that old golf saying you included definitely holds some weight lol. My first year on my high school team I could hardly break 100. By the end of the first season I was shooting low 80s high 70s to the point where my coach thought I was cheating and wouldn't let me on the team the following year. Luckily I changed schools and furthered my golf career. Also, I think it's already too late. I'm hooked. In golf, we call it "being bitten by the (golf) bug".

Also, (more directed towards Steve) if I am going to spend the money on professional instruction, I want it towards a series of lessons, not a one day thing. I would much rather find an instructor who can get to know my game over time and fine tune the lessons accordingly. That all goes back to golf. The "wham bam thank you mam" instructors can only teach you so much in a day. An instructor who has the time and opportunity to learn the way you approach the game and the way you play can teach you so much more than said instructors. To be honest, I'm not interested in a "traveling instructor" whatsoever, no disrespect intended. I'm more interested in a long term teacher, not a one day instructor, no matter how good they may or may not be (once again no disrespect intended). I learned through golf that the best instructors aren't the ones that try to completely reshape the way you approach and play the game, but the ones that can take what you already know, how you naturally play, and fix little things you don't see and show you things to improve upon what's naturally there.

Baxter
05-29-2010, 03:16 AM
Also, as a side note, has anybody else noticed how naturally good golfers are, more often than not, naturally good pool players? All the good golfers I know that play pool are good at both. But, not necessarily the other way around. Coincidence? I tend to think not. The best pool player that I personally know happens to be a PGA licensed golf instructor as well.

Baxter
05-29-2010, 03:20 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: KellyStick</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Where do you live? If it's close we might collaborate. I'm in Baton Rouge. </div></div>

That would be great, but unfortunately I'm all the way in Northern California. If anyone else who reads this is anywhere within a few hours, shoot me a message. I'm down to play with anybody, anytime, anywhere.

wolfdancer
05-29-2010, 08:47 PM
Chris McDonald and Kim Davenport were pretty good golfers, and I have also heard that Johnny Archer is the best of the 3. Kim has a great short game....I have a pretty good one as well...but it's off the tee. Another well known money player, hits a long ball just doesn't know which zip code it will land in....but around the green, has the same great touch that makes him one of the top one pocket players....and pretty tough to beat at 9 ball.
Kim's passion for golf....almost cost him his pool career.
He was hitting some balls at the driving range, when the cart picking up the balls, sent one in his direction....it hit the post, then rebounded into his eye, causing some damage. I'm sure he got a few shekels in the lawsuit that followed.
My first golf instructors almost turned me off the game....one guy was a former Champ in the Phillipines....but I don't think as a new golfer, you should be able to hit your drives 50 yds ahead of your instructor. The other guy decided that the way to cure my slice, was to cut a hook face in my new driver. It's hard to describe the damage that he did....but I tossed the club soon after.
You used to be able to find guys like that....as pool instructors...
Golf bug?....I never had it....played 5 days a week...3 in Reno, 2 in the bay area, played in the twilight, in the rain, and in a hailstorm in both Reno and Las Vegas, played 36 holes many times....the walls in my apt were damaged by errant swings, and a couple of lamps got knocked over and broke, a window, or two, the carpet had a few holes in it....which the landlord, a non golfer with no sympathy for my dedication to the game, made me pay for when I left....but I could take the game or leave it.
Golf bug? A friend had a heart attack on the first tee of his flight in the city championship, and was saved by a paramedic in the following group.....he was back playing in a few weeks as I recall.....another guy in Reno also had a heart attack and was advised to give up the game.....he joined our 3 some sometime later, and we were concerned....but he said that he loved the game, and if it was his time to go, he couldn't think of a better way to die....
"The Greatest Game ever played" is a great golf movie, now on dvd. The kid that caddied for Francis Quimet, when he beat Harry Vardon,...Eddie Lowery....grew up to become a millionaire auto dealership owner in San Francisco....and later on sponsored the "greatest match ever played".... Ben Hogan and "Lord" Byron Nelson.. against his two car salesman......Ken Venturi, and USGA amateur winner (and from my home town)Harvey Ward.

1Time
05-30-2010, 02:08 AM
Baxter,

Are you using a red circle Aramith cue ball or is it actually a red dot?

What size pool tables are you playing on in league - 7', 8', 9'?

What pool hall do you frequent, and what size tables do you shoot on there?

What local pool tournaments have you won?

Since you're wanting to go pro, I suggest adjusting your "I'm not in a big hurry" attitude. That's youth talking, and it's more in line with someone wanting to be a big fish in a small pond than a pro player. Likewise, I consider your intermediate league play goals as more of an obstacle to going pro than a stepping stone.

I suggest shooting around and watching better players instead of being around the mediocrity that's common in league play. I'm not suggesting leagues do not have any good shooters. The key question is whether you want to go pro or be a league champion. The sooner you choose go pro, the better your chances are of getting there.

Regarding your question about gambling. The wise choice is not to gamble - but of course I'm not suggesting you could not make money at it. The thing is you're wanting to go pro, and so I suggest focusing on that instead - tournament play for the money.

pooltchr
05-30-2010, 06:26 AM
One time has a valid point. If your goal is to be a professional player, focus on doing the things the pros do. That means playinng in every tournament you can get in. Tournament play is different from league play, and it is different from gambling. Tournament play requires you to quickly adjust to different tables, and different opponents. It requires endurance you won't find in league. In league, you play one match a week. In a tournament, you may have to play a half a dozen matches back to back in one day, and then if you are successful, come back and do the same thing the next day. And as you advance through the brackets, the competition gets tougher and tougher.

If you want to be a pro, you have to start thinking like one.

Steve

Baxter
05-30-2010, 06:27 PM
I'm not sure which Aramith ball it is. It's regulation size and weight, and has a bunch of red dots on it. Damn thing cost me about $45. It's the same one I see them use on TV. We play on the 7 foot tables in league, but we have a good pool hall in town called The Downlo with 9 footers, and I play there as much as possible. I placed 2nd in a local 3-ball tournament (the only tournament I've entered so far), but to be honest there aren't very many tournaments happening in my area. I'm trying to play in every tournament I can find. I'm looking into the California Pool Players Tour (see my post in the other forum), which I'm planning on being on next season. The biggest thing holding me back is finances. I don't have money to enter bigger tournaments, improve my equipment, or take lessons. I figured winning money on the table will help pay for those things, especially with a backer, if I happen to lose. The reason I've set my intermediate league goals is confidence related. CPPT season starts in May, league season ends in May. If I can walk away from my league season with those goals accomplished, it will be a huge boost of confidence when I turn around and immediately start the CPPT. The reason I say I'm not in a big hurry, is that I don't want to submerge myself into that kind of environment and level of play when I'm too green, unprepared, and about ready to have my spirit broken. I'm taking the time to prepare myself, because I think jumping in unprepared without a paddle would be a mistake. My goal is to be full-time pro by the time I'm 30. That's a little over 7 years. I believe that's reasonable and attainable, with diligence and a lot of hard work.

pooltchr
05-31-2010, 07:41 AM
Full time pro at 30? What is your back-up plan?
Understand that there are very few people in the world that can make a living playing pool. Consider the fact that even playing local and regional tournaments, you are making an investment in travel expenses and entry fees for a possible payoff. Unless you are consistently finishing in the top of the field, you are doing well just to break even.

Now, consider that the time, travel distance, and entry fees go up dramatically in pro events....and the competition is much greater, so your chances of finishing in the money get even tougher.

I dare say there are a very few professional players making a living playing pool. Most of them are doing something other than playing in order to pay bills and continue to play.

I know playing pool as a pro sounds somewhat glamerous, but you might want to talk to a few of them and get a reality check on what the life of a pro is really like. Just make sure you know what you are getting into.

Steve

Rich R.
05-31-2010, 08:49 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Full time pro at 30? What is your back-up plan?
Understand that there are very few people in the world that can make a living playing pool. Consider the fact that even playing local and regional tournaments, you are making an investment in travel expenses and entry fees for a possible payoff. Unless you are consistently finishing in the top of the field, you are doing well just to break even.

Now, consider that the time, travel distance, and entry fees go up dramatically in pro events....and the competition is much greater, so your chances of finishing in the money get even tougher.

I dare say there are a very few professional players making a living playing pool. Most of them are doing something other than playing in order to pay bills and continue to play.

I know playing pool as a pro sounds somewhat glamerous, but you might want to talk to a few of them and get a reality check on what the life of a pro is really like. Just make sure you know what you are getting into.

Steve </div></div>
Steve is telling you the truth. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/frown.gif

As popular TD Scott Smith says at many tournaments, "What does a pro pool player and a large pizza have in common?"
The answer: "Neither can feed a family of four."

My advise would be to do the best you can on your job and keep playing pool. Work hard and try to get the best job you can get and at the same time try to become the best player you can be. Then you will be able to afford going to a lot of top events and if you don't win, you can still afford to eat the next day. There are a number of so called "pro players" who also have day jobs and don't play in every event around the country.

Baxter
05-31-2010, 11:12 AM
I already have a career in the golf industry, 4 years in. I do maintenance, and am slated to get my pesticide license shortly. My goal in that area is to become a Superintendent. I know that pro pool doesn't pay well. I've done some research, and only the top 6-7 in the world make a decent living doing so. The most money they make is through sponsorships (again, very similar to golf). I'm not interested in pro pool for the money. I'm a very competitive person by nature, and I need a source of high level competition in my life. Of course I will continue with my "day job", and if I can play well enough to make some money I'll be happy, but my full intent is to become one of the best in the world. My aspirations are high yes, but please don't mistake that for not having a full grasp on reality. I believe that if you're trying to do what I'm doing, and your goal isn't to become the best in the world, you're settling for mediocrity.

Gayle in MD
05-31-2010, 11:59 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Baxter</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I already have a career in the golf industry, 4 years in. I do maintenance, and am slated to get my pesticide license shortly. My goal in that area is to become a Superintendent. I know that pro pool doesn't pay well. I've done some research, and only the top 6-7 in the world make a decent living doing so. The most money they make is through sponsorships (again, very similar to golf). I'm not interested in pro pool for the money. I'm a very competitive person by nature, and I need a source of high level competition in my life. Of course I will continue with my "day job", and if I can play well enough to make some money I'll be happy, but my full intent is to become one of the best in the world. My aspirations are high yes, but please don't mistake that for not having a full grasp on reality. I believe that if you're trying to do what I'm doing, and your goal isn't to become the best in the world, you're settling for mediocrity. </div></div>

Excellent attitude. Don't let the old wannabe's around here discourage you.

You say you have R.B.'s book, but do you have his tapes? Those tapes are great.

Having your own table, as soon as you can afford it, is also great, since many of the pros say they practice eight hours a day.

Having a good coach is also great. Someone who believes in, and wants to invest in a young person, with talent, is very inspiring over the long haul.

These days there is so much available and accessable on line, one can study, and practice, and improve their game through sheer persistance, and practice, practice, practice, (makes perfect.)

Dr. Dave has a huge amount of very good information that can be accessed straight from this site.

Good luck, sounds to me like you have a lot going for you, and the right attitude, too.

Gayle in Md. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

Brian in VA
05-31-2010, 04:26 PM
FWIW, with your work ethic a lesson from Scott Lee or Randy G would be a great investment. They provide you with a DVD of the lesson and this would allow you to preform the drills you'll need to have a stroke that will see you through. (I was a competitive golfer too. Think of this as the "beating balls" part of it. You have to groove the stroke.)

I recommend getting into competitive situations, preferably tournaments, as much as you can afford. I'm sorry to say that the gambling aspect of pool, at least around here, is such that you may have a difficult time finding anything but a locksmith to gamble with. While that will put some pressure on you, it will only provide you with an opportunity to give someone your money. That's just my opinion of course. I actually like to play for something but can only find people who want a lock instead of a match. (Back in my serious golf days in the late '70s I occasionally got into a $50 nassau with automatic one down presses. Made for some tense afternoons!) If I'm going to give someone cash, I'd rather it was an instructor that will help my game.

Good luck!

Brian in VA

Sid_Vicious
05-31-2010, 05:06 PM
Here's my take, for what it is worth. There are two sets of instructionals on DVD I recommend, "The Pro Book" and the set Dr Dave has out. The Pro Book has imperative lessons in fundamental shots for CB control. It is a little tedius in the practicing on shots you "don't think you need work on", but those are what you normally screw up on down the stretch. That dvd series by itself, with the work, will get you waaaaay down the "Pro Road."

Dave's set has got to be the most intense education in what's happening on the table when balls are struck and collide with other balls. I put off diving all the way in with the cash, but got these a week or so back,,,very good investment.

Now, as far as paid for lessons. I suggest finding someone recommended and buy an hour or two of his or her individual time. I do not subscribe to 6-7 hundred dollar pool schools, until you get the fundamentals, same thing like taking community classes in college instead of buying those hours at a full college cost. You will be amazed what you get off of these two sets of DVDs. Start with the Pro Book and let me know what you think. The book is cheaper of course, but I HATE trying to read and follow, then take it to the table. The videos are great.
So you spend a hundred(or three) on both of these sets. They are worth all of that IMPO.

I also condone gambling for the pressure, just learn to work the spot ASAP. sid

Baxter
05-31-2010, 06:22 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Baxter</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I already have a career in the golf industry, 4 years in. I do maintenance, and am slated to get my pesticide license shortly. My goal in that area is to become a Superintendent. I know that pro pool doesn't pay well. I've done some research, and only the top 6-7 in the world make a decent living doing so. The most money they make is through sponsorships (again, very similar to golf). I'm not interested in pro pool for the money. I'm a very competitive person by nature, and I need a source of high level competition in my life. Of course I will continue with my "day job", and if I can play well enough to make some money I'll be happy, but my full intent is to become one of the best in the world. My aspirations are high yes, but please don't mistake that for not having a full grasp on reality. I believe that if you're trying to do what I'm doing, and your goal isn't to become the best in the world, you're settling for mediocrity. </div></div>

Excellent attitude. Don't let the old wannabe's around here discourage you.

You say you have R.B.'s book, but do you have his tapes? Those tapes are great.

Having your own table, as soon as you can afford it, is also great, since many of the pros say they practice eight hours a day.

Having a good coach is also great. Someone who believes in, and wants to invest in a young person, with talent, is very inspiring over the long haul.

These days there is so much available and accessable on line, one can study, and practice, and improve their game through sheer persistance, and practice, practice, practice, (makes perfect.)

Dr. Dave has a huge amount of very good information that can be accessed straight from this site.

Good luck, sounds to me like you have a lot going for you, and the right attitude, too.

Gayle in Md. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif </div></div>

Thank you very much, it's good to hear something encouraging. I will do everything you mentioned. I actually found an 8' slate table on craigslist for $100. The guy has had it sitting in his storage unit, and just wants to get rid of it and make room. I'm going to check it out in the next couple days. Obviously for $100 I'm not expecting it to be perfect, but I will pick it up if it is serviceable. I was in Advanced Building Trades in high school, (almost made my own pool table ironically) so if it needs work it could become the perfect project for me.

Baxter
05-31-2010, 06:23 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sid_Vicious</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Here's my take, for what it is worth. There are two sets of instructionals on DVD I recommend, "The Pro Book" and the set Dr Dave has out. The Pro Book has imperative lessons in fundamental shots for CB control. It is a little tedius in the practicing on shots you "don't think you need work on", but those are what you normally screw up on down the stretch. That dvd series by itself, with the work, will get you waaaaay down the "Pro Road."

Dave's set has got to be the most intense education in what's happening on the table when balls are struck and collide with other balls. I put off diving all the way in with the cash, but got these a week or so back,,,very good investment.

Now, as far as paid for lessons. I suggest finding someone recommended and buy an hour or two of his or her individual time. I do not subscribe to 6-7 hundred dollar pool schools, until you get the fundamentals, same thing like taking community classes in college instead of buying those hours at a full college cost. You will be amazed what you get off of these two sets of DVDs. Start with the Pro Book and let me know what you think. The book is cheaper of course, but I HATE trying to read and follow, then take it to the table. The videos are great.
So you spend a hundred(or three) on both of these sets. They are worth all of that IMPO.

I also condone gambling for the pressure, just learn to work the spot ASAP. sid

</div></div>

I will definitely look into all of this. Thank you very much for the advice, it is much appreciated. Your view on gambling is the same one I hold. It keeps that competitive edge when something (even something small) is on the line. Most of the people at my pool hall won't play me for money, so I'm going to have to venture out. I'm thinking about investing in a Sneaky Pete just so I can get people to actually play with me. I found out quick that they won't play with you (even for free) when you have your own stick and can draw the ball over a table length. I really don't want to have to "dumb my game down" just to find competition though.

Baxter
05-31-2010, 06:33 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Brian in VA</div><div class="ubbcode-body">FWIW, with your work ethic a lesson from Scott Lee or Randy G would be a great investment. They provide you with a DVD of the lesson and this would allow you to preform the drills you'll need to have a stroke that will see you through. (I was a competitive golfer too. Think of this as the "beating balls" part of it. You have to groove the stroke.)

I recommend getting into competitive situations, preferably tournaments, as much as you can afford. I'm sorry to say that the gambling aspect of pool, at least around here, is such that you may have a difficult time finding anything but a locksmith to gamble with. While that will put some pressure on you, it will only provide you with an opportunity to give someone your money. That's just my opinion of course. I actually like to play for something but can only find people who want a lock instead of a match. (Back in my serious golf days in the late '70s I occasionally got into a $50 nassau with automatic one down presses. Made for some tense afternoons!) If I'm going to give someone cash, I'd rather it was an instructor that will help my game.

Good luck!

Brian in VA </div></div>

Thank you! I'll look into Scott or Randy's lessons further down the road, but like I mentioned earlier, I really want a coach, someone that will stick the ride out with me and believe in me, not just give me a single day lesson (no ill will or disrespect to Scott or Randy, I'm absolutely sure they have some very good stuff to teach, but their price is too high for me at this point in time, but maybe down the road). Trying to find someone to play around here sounds the same as what you deal with.

JJFSTAR
06-01-2010, 08:33 AM
Until you find a local coach/instructor video yourself and become a student of “your game”. You have a lot of study ahead of you most of it on the table but a couple of years (at least) in front of you cpu studying and that’s if you really attack like you are cramming for a test. You are going to have to bury yourself in pool. Your job, your friends, your family and your mate will all have to become secondary.

I don’t envy you but if you have any hope of attaining anything close to what you are hoping for that’s the price and if that makes you the slightest bit uncomfortable you should abandon the idea of ever competing against the best players in this world. I wish you luck.

wolfdancer
06-01-2010, 07:36 PM
I asked Robert Burns to autograph my copy of his book....
He wrote "to a fellow student of the game" I think he might have written that in many books, but he played in our weekly Billiards tournament, and I peppered him with questions when he was not playing....he remembered that when I cornered him with the book, in Reno a few years later. Nice guy !!!
With my short term memory problems, I'm always larnin "new" things about the game.

Rich R.
06-02-2010, 05:04 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Baxter</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I already have a career in the golf industry, 4 years in. I do maintenance, and am slated to get my pesticide license shortly. My goal in that area is to become a Superintendent. I know that pro pool doesn't pay well. I've done some research, and only the top 6-7 in the world make a decent living doing so. The most money they make is through sponsorships (again, very similar to golf). I'm not interested in pro pool for the money. I'm a very competitive person by nature, and I need a source of high level competition in my life. Of course I will continue with my "day job", and if I can play well enough to make some money I'll be happy, but my full intent is to become one of the best in the world. My aspirations are high yes, but please don't mistake that for not having a full grasp on reality. I believe that if you're trying to do what I'm doing, and your goal isn't to become the best in the world, you're settling for mediocrity. </div></div>
So many times we get posters who want to become pro players and they have no idea of what that means. You seem to know the reality of the situation and what it will take to achieve your goals. In this case, I say go for it and I wish you all of the luck in the world.

pooltchr
06-02-2010, 07:04 AM
I agree with Rich. As long as you have realistic expectations, and understand what you are getting into, why not? You seem to have a pretty good idea of the reality that is a professional pool player. Again, I would suggest reaching out to some who are there already, and get their input. They know, better than anyone, what it takes to get where they are.

Good Luck.

Steve

Baxter
06-02-2010, 08:02 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rich R.</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Baxter</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I already have a career in the golf industry, 4 years in. I do maintenance, and am slated to get my pesticide license shortly. My goal in that area is to become a Superintendent. I know that pro pool doesn't pay well. I've done some research, and only the top 6-7 in the world make a decent living doing so. The most money they make is through sponsorships (again, very similar to golf). I'm not interested in pro pool for the money. I'm a very competitive person by nature, and I need a source of high level competition in my life. Of course I will continue with my "day job", and if I can play well enough to make some money I'll be happy, but my full intent is to become one of the best in the world. My aspirations are high yes, but please don't mistake that for not having a full grasp on reality. I believe that if you're trying to do what I'm doing, and your goal isn't to become the best in the world, you're settling for mediocrity. </div></div>
So many times we get posters who want to become pro players and they have no idea of what that means. You seem to know the reality of the situation and what it will take to achieve your goals. In this case, I say go for it and I wish you all of the luck in the world.
</div></div>

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I agree with Rich. As long as you have realistic expectations, and understand what you are getting into, why not? You seem to have a pretty good idea of the reality that is a professional pool player. Again, I would suggest reaching out to some who are there already, and get their input. They know, better than anyone, what it takes to get where they are.

Good Luck.

Steve </div></div>

Thank you both. I've always had a pretty good grasp on reality, and I always learn what I'm getting myself into before I do anything. That's just the kind of person I am (Virgo, if you believe in that kind of stuff). I really do appreciate the support.

wolfdancer
06-04-2010, 08:12 PM
hey, stick around...we could use that pesticide license you have to get rid of a few pests here.