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Gayle in MD
06-18-2010, 08:17 AM
As I attended my grand-daughter's graduation from elementary school, to middle school, this week, I was so encouraged by what I have observed throughout her elementary education.

Her school is a public school, in a region where most moms stay home to raise their children, and hence, the parental involvement in the school is amazing in both numbers, and quality.

I was very proud when she was awarded the President's Education Award, and so impressed with the number of children, she included, who recieved special awards for outstanding academic performance, and civic contributions to their community.

The principle, and the teachers in her school are the most dedicated I have encountered over the course of my life, and equal to those fine teachers whom I observed in all of the Private Schools, which my daughter attended throughout her school years.

Along with the academic dedication, her school ranks top in her county, and the parental involvement provides a great athletic, arts and music opportunity for all of the children there.

I must say, I couldn't help but think of all the nasty posts I've read here, directed to our own Hondo, who, as I can easily tell, was himself, a very dedicated teacher. Where parents make raising their children well, their number one priority, above making money and buying goodies, the public school system thrives. I am really tired of seeing teachers blamed for the results of a lack of parental involvement in their children's academic life.

This post is a Hat's Off, to all of the dedicated public school teachers in our country, of which there are far more than we seem to realize or appreciate, and particularly to Hondo, for his own dedication to his profession.

G.

LWW
06-18-2010, 08:49 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Her school is a public school, in a region where most moms stay home to raise their children, and hence, the parental involvement in the school is amazing in both numbers, and quality.
G.</div></div>

Then why do you insist on promoting a agenda of a welfare state which splits minority and poor white families asunder ... depriving their children of the opportunities you commend?

LWW

Deeman3
06-18-2010, 08:51 AM
Con gratulations on your Granddaughter's graduation and the prise you hve in your school. My children, now my Grandchildren were fortunate to have good schools, albeit private schools, that made a big difference in their lives.

I agree that parental involvement is key to success in schools but, of course, there are millions of parents who will never be involved in their kid's school or other activities across the country. The best we can do in those cases is help the kids and parents who want to succeed and pass on through the ones who won't or can't as just asking them to leave is not an option now.

I think most of us value the many teachers who do make a difference and we just have to accept that the Unions will protect those who are not "up to snuf" or don't care.

Again, congratulations on your Granddaughter's award and graduation.

Gayle in MD
06-18-2010, 09:34 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Deeman3</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Con gratulations on your Granddaughter's graduation and the prise you hve in your school. My children, now my Grandchildren were fortunate to have good schools, albeit private schools, that made a big difference in their lives.

I agree that parental involvement is key to success in schools but, of course, there are millions of parents who will never be involved in their kid's school or other activities across the country. The best we can do in those cases is help the kids and parents who want to succeed and pass on through the ones who won't or can't as just asking them to leave is not an option now.

I think most of us value the many teachers who do make a difference and we just have to accept that the Unions will protect those who are not "up to snuf" or don't care.

Again, congratulations on your Granddaughter's award and graduation. </div></div>

Thank you Deeman.

I might add here, that according to my studies, a strong teachers union adds to the quality of our teachers, it doesn't detract, but I assume this, as in many other issues about which we do not agree, is to some degree, linked to the region of the country in which one lives.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Teacher-Union Bashing Is Simple-Minded
By Teresa Ghilarducci

Let's say you're advising a business with varying quality and you want to improve performance. Would you ridicule the workers publicly, cut their pay and benefits, and say that they are the sole cause of the problem and that you want brighter younger replacements who will work overtime and weekends? No new CEO would adopt this as a strategy for success. Attacking your work force is not an effective way to improve quality, produce a better product, and attract top talent—a bright young replacement would notice the disrespect.

So why do people think attacking teachers is a route to education reform?

This week's Sunday New York Times Magazine's cover story by Stephen Brill attacks teacher unions for ruining public education. Brill's main belief is that good teachers are all that matters, and his main culprit is tenure protections, which he views as protecting incompetent teachers (although no tenure provision prevents firing incompetent teachers—it just requires proof). The story is based on the belief that nonunion charter schools are better, using the single example of one school in Harlem.

Of course, teacher quality matters. But charter schools are no panacea. They have been studied to death, and the vast bulk of the evidence, even for programs funded by the pro-charter Gates Foundation, provides no evidence that charter schools are better. Brill's tendentious article, boosting the Obama Administration's education reforms that embrace charter schools, simply ignores the ever-growing evidence that charters make no measurable difference for students.

For example, the Rand Corporation finds that "across locations, there is little evidence that charter schools are producing, on average, achievement impacts that differ substantially from those of traditional public schools."

An Upjohn Institute study found no improvement in Michigan student achievement in charter schools.

And a Stanford study found "17 percent provide superior education opportunities for their students. Nearly half of the charter schools nationwide have results that are no different from the local public school options and over a third, 37 percent, deliver learning results that are significantly worse than their student would have realized had they remained in traditional public schools." These are not positive reports for charter-school zealots.

If the dream of education reformers is simply to get rid of unions, it will turn into a nightmare. Bright young hard-working teachers can't run on sheer energy for long. And research tells us that teacher effectiveness, whether in charter schools or regular unionized ones, grows steadily with each year of experience. Success for younger teachers almost always requires mentoring from experienced teachers.

And if the beef against unions is that their wages, pensions, and benefits cost money—a key issue in the Harlem example—I have news for the reformers: Cutting wages and benefits is not a way to attract high quality workers. Young teachers will get old and also want pensions and good wages, and if they don't get them, many will go work somewhere else.

The Ford Foundation is bucking the fad to simply blame teachers by funding projects that contribute to sensible, comprehensive reform. Improve teacher quality, yes—but also extend learning time with longer school days and school years, as most everyone agrees extending the school day and year are key to improving academic outcomes. Other pillars of real reform include stronger accountability beyond standardized tests, and adequate and stable funding beyond the unfair and discriminatory property tax system.

So sure, let's have high-quality teachers. The reformers' fantasy that success will magically occur simply by changing the form of school organization to charters is belied by plenty of data. Those interested in real reform should figure out how to work with teachers, not belittle and attack them.

</div></div>

G.

Sev
06-18-2010, 01:58 PM
Congrats Gayle.

A solid nuclear family with a stay at home parent that is positively engaged in the child's education combined with teachers of good quality and character is always a winning combination.
Nothing amazing about that. It just is and was once the norm.
It is how I remember my education and I suspect your teachers were better than mine if we were to compare time lines.

Gayle in MD
06-18-2010, 02:35 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sev</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Congrats Gayle.

A solid nuclear family with a stay at home parent that is positively engaged in the child's education combined with teachers of good quality and character is always a winning combination.
Nothing amazing about that. It just is and was once the norm.
It is how I remember my education and I suspect your teachers were better than mine if we were to compare time lines. </div></div>

Thank you for the congrats. I grew up with access to a fine education, and it seems to me that it was in the late sixties when the schools began to decline. Right around the time when I was wondering how my girl friends could bring themselves to leave six week old babies, to go to work. I still can't understand why people have children, only to have them play second to their jobs and careers. I don't think any effort is as successful, when one isn't there on the job, so to speak, however, I have kow some moms who pulled it off quite nicely. I still don't know how in the world they managed to do so.

I've been pleasantly surprised, and impressed, with the public schools in their neighborhood. As I say, most of the moms in that region are stay at home moms, and IMO, that makes all the difference in the schools and ijnj the neighborhoods, in general.

Just my 2c.

G.

Sev
06-18-2010, 02:43 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sev</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Congrats Gayle.

A solid nuclear family with a stay at home parent that is positively engaged in the child's education combined with teachers of good quality and character is always a winning combination.
Nothing amazing about that. It just is and was once the norm.
It is how I remember my education and I suspect your teachers were better than mine if we were to compare time lines. </div></div>

Thank you for the congrats. I grew up with access to a fine education, and it seems to me that it was in the late sixties when the schools began to decline. Right around the time when I was wondering how my girl friends could bring themselves to leave six week old babies, to go to work. I still can't understand why people have children, only to have them play second to their jobs and careers. I don't think any effort is as successful, when one isn't there on the job, so to speak, however, I have kow some moms who pulled it off quite nicely. I still don't know how in the world they managed to do so.

I've been pleasantly surprised, and impressed, with the public schools in their neighborhood. As I say, most of the moms in that region are stay at home moms, and IMO, that makes all the difference in the schools and ijnj the neighborhoods, in general.

Just my 2c.

G. </div></div>

I completely agree.

Now dont pass out on me. I know its shocking. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

Gayle in MD
06-18-2010, 03:06 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sev</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sev</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Congrats Gayle.

A solid nuclear family with a stay at home parent that is positively engaged in the child's education combined with teachers of good quality and character is always a winning combination.
Nothing amazing about that. It just is and was once the norm.
It is how I remember my education and I suspect your teachers were better than mine if we were to compare time lines. </div></div>

Thank you for the congrats. I grew up with access to a fine education, and it seems to me that it was in the late sixties when the schools began to decline. Right around the time when I was wondering how my girl friends could bring themselves to leave six week old babies, to go to work. I still can't understand why people have children, only to have them play second to their jobs and careers. I don't think any effort is as successful, when one isn't there on the job, so to speak, however, I have kow some moms who pulled it off quite nicely. I still don't know how in the world they managed to do so.

I've been pleasantly surprised, and impressed, with the public schools in their neighborhood. As I say, most of the moms in that region are stay at home moms, and IMO, that makes all the difference in the schools and ijnj the neighborhoods, in general.

Just my 2c.

G. </div></div>

I completely agree.

Now dont pass out on me. I know its shocking. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif </div></div>

Sorry it took so long for me to respond, I was pulling myelf up from the floor, lol. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif

Sev
06-18-2010, 06:12 PM
AHHAHHAHHAHH!!! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif