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View Full Version : When the going gets tough the Dutch get going.



LWW
08-02-2010, 08:45 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - The Netherlands became the first NATO country to end its combat mission in Afghanistan, drawing the curtain Sunday on a four-year operation that was deeply unpopular at home and even brought down a Dutch government. </div></div>
&gt;&gt;&gt;IMAGINE THAT&lt;&lt;&lt; (http://apnews.myway.com/article/20100801/D9HAQKM81.html)

LWW

Deeman3
08-02-2010, 10:29 AM
I do appreciate the Dutch troops that did go and fight. It had to be tough in a sson to be Muslim majority nation to do it as long as they did.

Soon, we will be gone if you count 50,000 troops gone (in Iraq of course) but I think the solution will ultimately have to lie with Israel. They have the right stuff and the right weapons. How many on here think they will lie down and die without a fight?

It might be a horrible thing to see but perhaps if they do use the weapons they have, a more firm message will be heard in the Middle East. At the very least, we will see which of the Muslim nations are serious and which ones were just "misunderstood" as some commentators on the left are now saying.

Perhaps a fresh start for the few left might give them a few generations to think about it anyway.

LWW
08-02-2010, 10:43 AM
I fear that if this happens, dearest leader will place US forces in defense of Iran.

LWW

llotter
08-03-2010, 07:41 AM
While I am almost as reluctant to give credit to Bush as I am The Moron, it does look like he had it about right in minimizing US Forces in Afghanistan. I remember the concept that it was a 'target poor' country and it did seem to me that Afghanistan was not a place for major commitments but needed enough to continue disrupting the enemy's use of it as a base of operation. It's going to be, in Rumfeld's words, 'a long hard slog' but it should also be a valuable learning experience that we should help us better defeat the thugs of the world.

I also agree with Bush that spreading freedom is, in the long run, the best way to build a more secure world and that it is essentially America's obligation to carry that message. Spreading freedom will ultimately undermine the war syndrome that permeates would-be tyrants and dictators ability to gain traction among the various populations.

The 'Shinning City on the Hill' is itself, however, rapidly becoming tarnished as our own freedoms have been diminished as the same tyrant and dictator mentality push their self-serving, statist propaganda here at home. There is a large contingent of the world's leftists doing everything they can to undermine freedom right here at home and we need to defeat them also.

LWW
08-03-2010, 08:57 AM
The astounding thing is that the eastern Euros ... sans the UK ... live in freedom bought and paid for with US blood and treasure, residing in nations built/rebuilt by US military and economic might, and then lack the testicular/ovarian fortitude to make the long term commitments needed to bring freedom and civilization to other parts of the world.

LWW

llotter
08-03-2010, 10:31 AM
I am thinking that 'spreading freedom and civilization' should be largely a educational/propaganda efforts rather than economic aid. And I question whether freedom and Islam are compatible and needs some work to find out.

LWW
08-03-2010, 10:37 AM
Freedom and the Japanese/German culture were also thought to be incompatible. If we used those nations as models we would by now have Iraq/Afghanistan to roughly 1955 social and civilization levels.

Of course that would require making the residents realize the prior regimes were inherently evil and the execution of terrorists on the spot.

The west currently doesn't have the will to survive.

LWW

hondo
08-03-2010, 09:52 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - The Netherlands became the first NATO country to end its combat mission in Afghanistan, drawing the curtain Sunday on a four-year operation that was deeply unpopular at home and even brought down a Dutch government. </div></div>
&gt;&gt;&gt;IMAGINE THAT&lt;&lt;&lt; (http://apnews.myway.com/article/20100801/D9HAQKM81.html)

LWW
</div></div>

Smart move.

Qtec
08-04-2010, 01:00 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The astounding thing is that the eastern Euros ... sans the UK ... live in <span style='font-size: 14pt'>freedom bought and paid for with US blood</span> and treasure, residing in nations built/rebuilt by US military and economic might, and then lack the testicular/ovarian fortitude to make the long term commitments needed to bring freedom and civilization to other parts of the world.

LWW </div></div>

Sometimes you are just dumb, now you are just insulting.

The USA lost 400,000 troops fighting the Nazi's, the Russians lost 10 Million.
The death toll from Poland, Yugoslavia and France alone was 8 million.


We have not forgotten.


Q

link (http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/campaigns/our_boys/2972414/Woman-spent-45-years-caring-grave-of-hero-British-airman.html)

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Three Girl Scouts tend to graves of forgotten soldiers


By Terry Boyd, Stars and Stripes
European edition, Sunday, June 1, 2003



BAUMHOLDER, Germany — In death, all that’s left is three forgotten names — two on granite tombstones and one on a wood cross — in Baumholder’s cemetery.

Who were these men in life, these Americans buried on German soil?

Who were these soldiers?

To three Girl Scouts, the men started out as a project. To earn the Cadette Girl Scouts’ highest award, the Silver Award, as well as merit badges, Erica Hill, 14; Emily Hernandez Goldstein, 15; and Maria Arvelo, 15, decided to pick up on a grave-maintenance project started by the local Veterans of Foreign Wars chapter.

The project’s goal was “to show the American soldiers and civilians who died and were buried here with no family [that] they are not forgotten,” Emily said in a presentation last Tuesday night during the Baumholder Troop 77 Girl Scout banquet.
</div></div>

Another.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Waiting list for adopting American graves



25-05-2009
Interview with a Belgian grave adopter

Each year fewer American World War II veterans come to the Memorial Day ceremony at the American cemetery in Margraten, the Netherlands. The last survivors are getting on in years and the trip to the Netherlands is a daunting undertaking. But the interest in ‘adopting' the graves has never been greater.

Five Dutch F-16's on Sunday flew over the American military cemetery in Margraten, the Netherlands. The jets issued a so-called ‘missing man' salute: one jet left the formation and soared straight into the sky.

The salute formed the finale of the annual Memorial Day ceremony in honour of the 8,301 American WWII soldiers buried at Margraten, as well as 1,700 men missing in action whose names are listed on a memorial wall. They died in 1944 during the Battle of Arnhem (famously portrayed in ‘A Bride Too Far') and in Belgium, and in 1945 during the eastward march from southern Netherlands towards Germany.

Personal bond
The American cemetery - located in the south of the Netherlands near borders with Germany and Belgium - is the third largest in Europe. The first American war casualty was buried here almost 65 years ago. After all those years one wonders how salient the memory is of what happened in this region during the World War II?

An answer can be found at Margraten, where ordinary citizens have forged personal bonds with the graves. All 8,301 graves in Margraten and the 1,700 names of the missing have been ‘adopted', a tradition that began shortly after the end of the war. As of 2009 interest in adopting a grave is greater than ever. <span style='font-size: 20pt'>There is even a waiting list of people who want to feel responsible for maintaining the remembrance.</span>
</div></div>

Now STFU.

war dead (http://warchronicle.com/numbers/WWII/deaths.htm)

LWW
08-04-2010, 04:21 AM
1 - The fact that you can get 10,000 volunteers out of a continent of millions doesn't impress me.

2- I have no doubt that many of them are expats.

3 - If you think the Euros could have won WWII without the USA you are delusional.

4 - Ever hear of the Lend Lease Act? When might we expect repayment of the billions is US $$$$ that our Euro "FRIENDS" defaulted on? Other than the UK, the US was never repaid.

LWW